History Main / NotSoCrazyAnymore

20th May '16 12:55:54 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''NotTheNineOClockNews'' later did the same thing but with fat (or [[InsistentTerminology stout]]) people as an oppressed group, and much the same defictionalisation has since happened with the obesity debate.
* Back in the day, ''TheTwoRonnies'' did a sketch about the absolutely ludicrous idea of people paying money for bottled water, and paying large amounts for 'expensive' bottles of water. WhoWouldBeStupidEnough? Bottle water was also popular for centuries during the Enlightenment and Victorian eras. This was mainly because city water supplies were also as bad as dehydration. It was only around the time that water purifcation was done on a large scale that bottled water fell out of popularity. Or in other words, someone drinking from a public fountain is an example of this trope.

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* ''NotTheNineOClockNews'' ''Series/NotTheNineOClockNews'' later did the same thing but with fat (or [[InsistentTerminology stout]]) people as an oppressed group, and much the same defictionalisation has since happened with the obesity debate.
* Back in the day, ''TheTwoRonnies'' ''Sereis/TheTwoRonnies'' did a sketch about the absolutely ludicrous idea of people paying money for bottled water, and paying large amounts for 'expensive' bottles of water. WhoWouldBeStupidEnough? Bottle water was also popular for centuries during the Enlightenment and Victorian eras. This was mainly because city water supplies were also as bad as dehydration. It was only around the time that water purifcation was done on a large scale that bottled water fell out of popularity. Or in other words, someone drinking from a public fountain is an example of this trope.
20th May '16 12:55:28 AM Morgenthaler
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* Similar to the ''Dick Tracy'' example above, the first scene of ''Series/GetSmart'' (the 1965 series) involves the ''absolutely crazy'' idea of a phone going off at a concert.

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* Similar to the ''Dick Tracy'' example above, the The first scene of ''Series/GetSmart'' (the 1965 series) involves the ''absolutely crazy'' idea of a phone going off at a concert.
20th May '16 12:55:08 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''{{Fahrenheit 451}}'' falls into Forgotten Trope territory. The TV sets in the movie were, in context of the fifties, ridiculously gigantic, and viewers would just look at them in awe of how unnecessarily large and room-centering they are. Today, [=TV=]s of such size are commonplace, and this is not something a modern viewer is likely to catch on to without knowledge of the original context.

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* ''{{Fahrenheit 451}}'' ''Literature/Fahrenheit451'' falls into Forgotten Trope territory. The TV sets in the movie were, in context of the fifties, ridiculously gigantic, and viewers would just look at them in awe of how unnecessarily large and room-centering they are. Today, [=TV=]s of such size are commonplace, and this is not something a modern viewer is likely to catch on to without knowledge of the original context.



* A JulesVerne example is the posthumously-published ''ParisInTheTwentiethCentury''. Part of the reason the publisher rejected it whilst Verne was alive was that it was too unbelievable. Many modern commentators love to point out, however, just how accurate and resonant it is. (At the same time, others point out the things he missed, as well as the unbelievably pessimistic outlook, part of the reason the book got rejected in the first place!)

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* A JulesVerne Creator/JulesVerne example is the posthumously-published ''ParisInTheTwentiethCentury''.''Literature/ParisInTheTwentiethCentury''. Part of the reason the publisher rejected it whilst Verne was alive was that it was too unbelievable. Many modern commentators love to point out, however, just how accurate and resonant it is. (At the same time, others point out the things he missed, as well as the unbelievably pessimistic outlook, part of the reason the book got rejected in the first place!)
19th May '16 6:25:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''TheMoteInGodsEye'' featured a parody of wine snobs, a "coffee connoisseur". When it was published, in the 1970s, the idea of someone taking coffee that seriously was inherently comical.

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* ''TheMoteInGodsEye'' ''Literature/TheMoteInGodsEye'' featured a parody of wine snobs, a "coffee connoisseur". When it was published, in the 1970s, the idea of someone taking coffee that seriously was inherently comical.
12th May '16 6:00:29 AM DevilMaster
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* ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': Jules Verne wrote in 1869 about Captain Nemo, a man from an oppressed eastern country who [[MajoredInWesternHypocrisy had training in the west,]] and has [[{{Fiction500}} money enough to pay a country’s national debt,]] who decides to create an [[NGOSuperpower organization strong enough]] to [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters fight]] an [[TheEmpire entire Western country]] [[MoralEventHorizon through terrible acts of violence]], [[TheWarOnTerror and therefore is chased as a menace by all established countries in the West.]] Since the beginning of his career as a writer, Verne was being accused by critics of being '''[[ScifiGhetto only]]''' [[ScifiGhetto a HardScifi writer that paid little heed to the social ramifications of technology]]. After OsamaBinLaden, September 11th and TheWarOnTerror, we must admit that Verne's ideas really reflected much more than anyone ever suspected about how the world will turn in the next 130 years!
** Though it should be noted that the closeness of the comparison requires some misconceptions about both Bin Laden and Nemo. (For one, the idea that Bin Laden was trained by the CIA is essentially an urban legend, so that part is inaccurate to start with.)
* Another Verne example being the posthumously-published ''ParisInTheTwentiethCentury''. Part of the reason the publisher rejected it whilst Verne was alive was that it was too unbelievable. Many modern commentators love to point out, however, just how accurate and resonant it is. (At the same time, others point out the things he missed, as well as the unbelievably pessimistic outlook, part of the reason the book got rejected in the first place!)

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* ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': Jules Verne wrote in 1869 about Captain Nemo, a man from an oppressed eastern country who [[MajoredInWesternHypocrisy had training in the west,]] and has [[{{Fiction500}} money enough to pay a country’s national debt,]] who decides to create an [[NGOSuperpower organization strong enough]] to [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters fight]] an [[TheEmpire entire Western country]] [[MoralEventHorizon through terrible acts of violence]], [[TheWarOnTerror and therefore is chased as a menace by all established countries in the West.]] Since the beginning of his career as a writer, Verne was being accused by critics of being '''[[ScifiGhetto only]]''' [[ScifiGhetto a HardScifi writer that paid little heed to the social ramifications of technology]]. After OsamaBinLaden, September 11th and TheWarOnTerror, we must admit that Verne's ideas really reflected much more than anyone ever suspected about how the world will turn in the next 130 years!
** Though it should be noted that the closeness of the comparison requires some misconceptions about both Bin Laden and Nemo. (For one, the idea that Bin Laden was trained by the CIA is essentially an urban legend, so that part is inaccurate to start with.)
* Another Verne
A JulesVerne example being is the posthumously-published ''ParisInTheTwentiethCentury''. Part of the reason the publisher rejected it whilst Verne was alive was that it was too unbelievable. Many modern commentators love to point out, however, just how accurate and resonant it is. (At the same time, others point out the things he missed, as well as the unbelievably pessimistic outlook, part of the reason the book got rejected in the first place!)
25th Apr '16 11:13:20 AM MasoTey
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* Similar to the ''Dick Tracy'' example above, the first scene of ''Series/GetSmart'' (the 1965 series) involves the ''absolutely crazy'' idea of a phone going off in a movie theater.

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* Similar to the ''Dick Tracy'' example above, the first scene of ''Series/GetSmart'' (the 1965 series) involves the ''absolutely crazy'' idea of a phone going off in at a movie theater.concert.
4th Feb '16 11:11:16 PM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Series/TheJoeSchmoShow'' is a closer example, as the show features a single or two people who don't know that pretty much everything else going on around them in the supposed "reality show," is, in fact scripted and that all of their cast-mates are actors.
4th Feb '16 11:05:46 PM JMQwilleran
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[[folder:Advertising]]
* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXKqdi0Wp0E One]] of the "Why haven't you called Advertising/{{GEICO}}?" ads from 2004 featured a fake reality show called ''Tiny House''. The ad was a good take on typical ads for reality shows of the time and probably fooled many people. The concept presented was two newlyweds who have to live together for one year in the titular tiny house. "The drama will be real... but it won't save you any money on car insurance." However, just look at the related videos on [=YouTube=] and you'll see a bunch of listings about actual tiny houses. Since the airing of the ad, an actual "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiny_house_movement tiny house movement]]" has gained a lot of traction.
[[/folder]]
1st Feb '16 9:52:15 AM Nopperabo
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''{{Area 88}}'' manga treated the use of armed drones in combat as alarming and strange. In the 21st century, drones are now an accepted part of warfare.
30th Jan '16 1:02:09 AM AnotherGuy
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** Film/{{S1m0ne}} from 2002 waves "hello".

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** Film/{{S1m0ne}} ''Film/{{S1m0ne}}'' from 2002 waves "hello".
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