History Main / NoseArt

17th Nov '16 12:22:34 PM dlchen145
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* Nose art and anything comparable has been banned by the USAF for fear that pilots may select something non-PC, thus offending Mother Gaia, or something.
-->'''[[Film/ApocalypseNow COL Kurtz:]]''' They train young men to drop fire on people. But their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes...because it's ''obscene''.
17th Nov '16 6:14:49 AM ashlay
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': One of the character's GuardianEntity, Captain Kidd, stands on top of a miniature {{pirate}} ship with a SlasherSmile shark grin painted on the bow.
14th Nov '16 12:46:58 PM SAMAS
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** Becomes a joke in the unfinished "Bad Batch" arc, when Anakin notices the LAAT/i used by the titular squad has a pinup of his ''wife'' on it.
10th Nov '16 8:12:27 AM dlchen145
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'''Type E:''' Humorous cartoons. This type was especially popular in the USAAF and Finnish air forces, and would often depict a popular cartoon character, such as Donald Duck or Batman. This type of nose art is common even today. It usually depicts either the war itself or the enemy in ironic or satirical way, and is usually connected to the individual name of the plane. The extreme example of this was a B-24M Liberator [[http://www.b24bestweb.com/itaintsofunny3.htm "It Ain't So Funny,"]] whose [[UpToEleven entire nose]] was covered with cartoon characters. Since Type-B has been banned, this had become the US Air Force's go-to method, [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad even that got banned]].

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'''Type E:''' Humorous cartoons. This type was especially popular in the USAAF and Finnish air forces, and would often depict a popular cartoon character, such as Donald Duck or Batman. This type of nose art is common even today. It usually depicts either the war itself or the enemy in ironic or satirical way, and is usually connected to the individual name of the plane. The extreme example of this was a B-24M Liberator [[http://www.b24bestweb.com/itaintsofunny3.htm "It Ain't So Funny,"]] whose [[UpToEleven entire nose]] was covered with cartoon characters. Since Type-B has been banned, this had become the US Air Force's go-to method, [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad even that got banned]].
10th Nov '16 8:10:48 AM dlchen145
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'''Type B:''' The "[[PublicExposure Pin-Up]] Girl". Made famous in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, these designs often featured scantily-clad (or nude) women in suggestive poses. Many of these were very temporary in nature, and it was not at all rare for the pinup art to reflect the name of the aircraft (such as the famous "Film/MemphisBelle"). Though common among American aircraft in WWII and Korea, it went out of style after that, due to [[MoralGuardians certain individuals]] [[StopHavingFunGuys declaring it "obscene," "sexist," and "unprofessional"]] for young men to fly high-risk combat missions with such markings on their aircraft. [[BritsWithBattleships RAF]] aviators maintained the practice through the 1991 Gulf War before the same forces caught up with them. Colonel Kurtz delivers a [[ArmorPiercingQuestion scathing and spot-on assessment]] of the discontinuation of this practice in ''Film/ApocalypseNow''.

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'''Type B:''' The "[[PublicExposure Pin-Up]] Girl". Made famous in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, these designs often featured scantily-clad (or nude) women in suggestive poses. Many of these were very temporary in nature, and it was not at all rare for the pinup art to reflect the name of the aircraft (such as the famous "Film/MemphisBelle"). Though common among American aircraft in WWII and Korea, it went out of style after that, due to [[MoralGuardians certain individuals]] [[StopHavingFunGuys declaring it "obscene," "sexist," and "unprofessional"]] for young men to fly high-risk combat missions with such markings on their aircraft. [[BritsWithBattleships RAF]] aviators maintained the practice through the 1991 Gulf War before the same forces caught up with them. Colonel Kurtz delivers a [[ArmorPiercingQuestion scathing and spot-on assessment]] of the discontinuation of this practice in ''Film/ApocalypseNow''.



* Discussed in ''Film/ApocalypseNow,''

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* Discussed in ''Film/ApocalypseNow,''In ''Film/ApocalypseNow'', Colonel Kurtz delivers a [[ArmorPiercingQuestion scathing and spot-on assessment]] of the discontinuation of this practice.
10th Nov '16 8:03:39 AM dlchen145
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'''Type B:''' The "[[PublicExposure Pin-Up]] Girl". Made famous in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, these designs often featured scantily-clad (or nude) women in suggestive poses. Many of these were very temporary in nature, and it was not at all rare for the pinup art to reflect the name of the aircraft (such as the famous "Film/MemphisBelle"). This common among American aircraft in WWII and Korea went out of style after that, due to [[MoralGuardians certain individuals]] [[StopHavingFunGuys declaring it "obscene," "sexist," and "unprofessional"]] for young men to fly high-risk combat missions with such markings on their aircraft. [[BritsWithBattleships RAF]] aviators maintained the practice through the 1991 Gulf War before the same forces caught up with them. Colonel Kurtz delivers a [[ArmorPiercingQuestion scathing and spot-on assessment]] of the discontinuation of this practice in ''Film/ApocalypseNow''.

to:

'''Type B:''' The "[[PublicExposure Pin-Up]] Girl". Made famous in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, these designs often featured scantily-clad (or nude) women in suggestive poses. Many of these were very temporary in nature, and it was not at all rare for the pinup art to reflect the name of the aircraft (such as the famous "Film/MemphisBelle"). This Though common among American aircraft in WWII and Korea Korea, it went out of style after that, due to [[MoralGuardians certain individuals]] [[StopHavingFunGuys declaring it "obscene," "sexist," and "unprofessional"]] for young men to fly high-risk combat missions with such markings on their aircraft. [[BritsWithBattleships RAF]] aviators maintained the practice through the 1991 Gulf War before the same forces caught up with them. Colonel Kurtz delivers a [[ArmorPiercingQuestion scathing and spot-on assessment]] of the discontinuation of this practice in ''Film/ApocalypseNow''.
6th Nov '16 8:13:21 AM YT45
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'''Type E:''' Humorous cartoons. This type was especially popular in the USAAF and Finnish air forces, and would often depict a popular cartoon character, such as Donald Duck or Batman. This type of nose art is common even today. It usually depicts either the war itself or the enemy in ironic or satirical way, and is usually connected to the individual name of the plane. The extreme example of this was a B-24M Liberator [[http://www.b24bestweb.com/itaintsofunny3.htm "It Ain't So Funny,"]] whose [[UpToEleven entire nose]] was covered with cartoon characters. Since Type-B has been banned, this has become the US Air Force's go-to method.

to:

'''Type E:''' Humorous cartoons. This type was especially popular in the USAAF and Finnish air forces, and would often depict a popular cartoon character, such as Donald Duck or Batman. This type of nose art is common even today. It usually depicts either the war itself or the enemy in ironic or satirical way, and is usually connected to the individual name of the plane. The extreme example of this was a B-24M Liberator [[http://www.b24bestweb.com/itaintsofunny3.htm "It Ain't So Funny,"]] whose [[UpToEleven entire nose]] was covered with cartoon characters. Since Type-B has been banned, this has had become the US Air Force's go-to method.method, [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad even that got banned]].
6th Nov '16 8:11:22 AM YT45
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Added DiffLines:

-->'''[[Film/ApocalypseNow COL Kurtz:]]''' They train young men to drop fire on people. But their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes...because it's ''obscene''.
6th Nov '16 7:49:57 AM YT45
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'''Type B:''' The "[[PublicExposure Pin-Up]] Girl". Made famous in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, these designs often featured scantily clad women in suggestive poses. Many of these were very temporary in nature, and it was not at all rare for the pinup art to reflect the name of the aircraft (such as the famous "Film/MemphisBelle"). This went out of style after the war, due to a variety of reasons.

'''Type C:''' [[TravelCool Full-body flashy paintjobs]]: Often invoked when RuleOfCool is the primary motivator behind the paint scheme. This is common for demonstration aircraft used at air shows or VIP transports not intended to be used near the front lines. Sometimes, even camouflage can fit into this category, as some patterns designed to be very effective at a distance can look downright garish up close.

'''Type D:''' Patriotic slogans or pictures, or taunts to the enemy. The most common taunt are simple silhouettes on the fuselage showing how many aircraft the plane has shot down. This kind of nose art was especially popular in USSR (and is still in Russia), where pilots named their planes after their parents, siblings, fallen comrades or historical national heroes (Dimitri Donskoy, Aleksandr Nevsky, Aleksandr Suvorov etc). Some artforms could depict a Soviet eagle subduing a Fascist beast, or slogans like "Mstitel" (Avenger), "Na Zapad" (To West!), Za Rodiny ("For Fatherland") or "Smiert fashistam" (Death to Fascists). They were also popular in the USAAF and RAF.

'''Type E:''' Humorous cartoons. This type was especially popular in the USAAF and Finnish air forces, and would often depict a popular cartoon character, such as Donald Duck or Batman. This type of nose art is common even today. It usually depicts either the war itself or the enemy in ironic or satirical way, and is usually connected to the individual name of the plane. The extreme example of this was a B-24M Liberator [[http://www.b24bestweb.com/itaintsofunny3.htm "It Ain't So Funny,"]] whose [[UpToEleven entire nose]] was covered with cartoon characters.

to:

'''Type B:''' The "[[PublicExposure Pin-Up]] Girl". Made famous in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, these designs often featured scantily clad scantily-clad (or nude) women in suggestive poses. Many of these were very temporary in nature, and it was not at all rare for the pinup art to reflect the name of the aircraft (such as the famous "Film/MemphisBelle"). This common among American aircraft in WWII and Korea went out of style after the war, that, due to [[MoralGuardians certain individuals]] [[StopHavingFunGuys declaring it "obscene," "sexist," and "unprofessional"]] for young men to fly high-risk combat missions with such markings on their aircraft. [[BritsWithBattleships RAF]] aviators maintained the practice through the 1991 Gulf War before the same forces caught up with them. Colonel Kurtz delivers a variety [[ArmorPiercingQuestion scathing and spot-on assessment]] of reasons.

the discontinuation of this practice in ''Film/ApocalypseNow''.

'''Type C:''' [[TravelCool Full-body flashy paintjobs]]: Often invoked when RuleOfCool is the primary motivator behind the paint scheme. This is common for demonstration aircraft used at air shows or VIP transports not intended to be used near the front lines. Sometimes, even camouflage can fit into this category, as some patterns designed to be very effective at a distance can look downright garish up close.

close. It was most common for combat aircraft in WWI, when famous aces on both sides ''wanted'' everyone to know they were there. [[RedBaron Manfred Von Richtofen's]] "Flying Circus" took this to extremes, with every plane wearing a distinctive garish paint job, with all-red airplanes being reserved for the personal use of the young Baron himself.

'''Type D:''' Patriotic slogans or pictures, or taunts to the enemy. The most common taunt are simple silhouettes on the fuselage showing how many aircraft the plane has shot down. This kind of nose art was especially popular in USSR (and is still in Russia), where pilots named their planes after their parents, siblings, fallen comrades or historical national heroes (Dimitri Donskoy, Aleksandr Nevsky, Aleksandr Suvorov etc). Some artforms could depict a Soviet eagle subduing a Fascist beast, or slogans like "Mstitel" (Avenger), "Na Zapad" (To West!), Za Rodiny ("For Fatherland") or "Smiert fashistam" (Death to Fascists). They were also popular in the USAAF and RAF.

RAF. Can often be combined with Type-B.

'''Type E:''' Humorous cartoons. This type was especially popular in the USAAF and Finnish air forces, and would often depict a popular cartoon character, such as Donald Duck or Batman. This type of nose art is common even today. It usually depicts either the war itself or the enemy in ironic or satirical way, and is usually connected to the individual name of the plane. The extreme example of this was a B-24M Liberator [[http://www.b24bestweb.com/itaintsofunny3.htm "It Ain't So Funny,"]] whose [[UpToEleven entire nose]] was covered with cartoon characters.
characters. Since Type-B has been banned, this has become the US Air Force's go-to method.
4th Nov '16 2:36:12 PM Codefreak5
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* Used on a couple of hacked Combine turrets in ''[[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Half-Life 2: Episode 2]]''. One features the famous shark-nose design, while the other has orange stripes and the resistance's (and [[VideoGame/HalfLife the series']]) signature lambda logo.
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