History Main / NoMatterHowMuchIBeg

23rd Aug '17 7:03:24 AM CosmicFerret
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* Done multiple times within the space of one episode of ''[[{{Garfield}} Garfield and Friends]]'' with Jon Arbuckle's Little Black Book.

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* Done multiple times within the space of one episode of ''[[{{Garfield}} Garfield and Friends]]'' ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' with Jon Arbuckle's Little Black Book.
16th Jun '17 5:59:23 PM Vox
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** His friends still refuse to let him out... and he then [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome manages to talk the Monster round anyway.]]

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** His Frederick's friends still refuse to let him out... and he then he [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome manages to talk the Monster round anyway.]]
22nd May '17 4:12:12 PM Eievie
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Version 1: Alice, for whatever reason, hands over a possession to Bob and asks Bob not to give it back until X happens. Example: "No matter how much I beg, don't let me [[TVTropesWillRuinYourLife get on TV Tropes until I've finished my homework so I'm not distracted.]]"

Version 2: A variant of SelfRestraint. Alice allows herself to be [[KindRestraints tied up or imprisoned]] and instructs Bob not to let her loose--usually because she is about to be [[NotHimself Not Herself]] in some way, or acquire some dangerous power.

Either way, Alice is doing something she knows is for the best, but she also knows that she'll want out later and needs someone else to keep her in line. She will always tell Bob, "Remember, you can't give in, no matter how much I beg you." Later, Alice will almost invariably beg Bob to give the object back/ let her out of prison. Often she will be entirely justified in doing so because of some development she hadn't foreseen.

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Version 1: *'''Version 1:''' Alice, for whatever reason, hands over a possession to Bob and asks Bob not to give it back until X happens. Example: "No matter how much I beg, don't let me [[TVTropesWillRuinYourLife get on TV Tropes until I've finished my homework so I'm not distracted.]]"

Version 2:
]]"
*'''Version 2:'''
A variant of SelfRestraint. Alice allows herself to be [[KindRestraints tied up or imprisoned]] and instructs Bob not to let her loose--usually because she is about to be [[NotHimself Not Herself]] in some way, or acquire some dangerous power.

Either way, Alice is doing something she knows is for the best, but she also knows that she'll want out later and needs someone else to keep her in line. She will always tell Bob, "Remember, you can't give in, no matter how much I beg you." Later, Alice will almost invariably beg Bob to give the object back/ let back/let her out of prison. Often she will be entirely justified in doing so because of some development she hadn't foreseen.



Example 3: (Keep in mind this example is only for non-malicious items.) Alice has left Item X in location D (say her house J miles away) because she does not want it for V reason. Bob finds it, and tries to return it. Alice refuses, but Bob is persistent. Alice says Bob can keep Item X, and Bob doesn't want to take it from her because he finds it "stealing" (or any other reason really.) Alice uses this trope, and Bob walks away. He probably does something with it Alice wants to do, and she asks for it back. Bob refuses, because "no matter how much I beg or what have you, don't give X back."

Whether Bob gives in or not is dependent on the genre of the story. It may be played for laughs with Bob taking the directions too literally and refusing to free Alice even when he obviously should, either out of malice or stupidity. If Bob is especially stupid, he may go the opposite route and let Alice out prematurely when she asks him. This may lead to dire consequences if Alice is a danger to those around her, or may be played for laughs with Alice rebuking him for letting her go.

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Example 3: *'''Example 3''': (Keep in mind this example is only for non-malicious items.) Alice has left Item X in location D (say her house J miles away) because she does not want it for V reason. Bob finds it, and tries to return it. Alice refuses, but Bob is persistent. Alice says Bob can keep Item X, and Bob doesn't want to take it from her because he finds it "stealing" (or any other reason really.) Alice uses this trope, and Bob walks away. He probably does something with it Alice wants to do, and she asks for it back. Bob refuses, because "no matter how much I beg or what have you, don't give X back."

Whether
"\\
\\Whether
Bob gives in or not is dependent on the genre of the story. It may be played for laughs with Bob taking the directions too literally and refusing to free Alice even when he obviously should, either out of malice or stupidity. If Bob is especially stupid, he may go the opposite route and let Alice out prematurely when she asks him. This may lead to dire consequences if Alice is a danger to those around her, or may be played for laughs with Alice rebuking him for letting her go.
11th May '17 6:29:17 PM intastiel
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* PlayedForLaughs in the ''Series/CurbYourEnthusiasm'' episode "Palestinian Chicken" when Juliette tells Larry to keep her away from the dessert table at a dinner party, "no matter what" she says. Larry being the ButtMonkey of the series, it isn't so simple.
2nd May '17 3:15:27 PM Vox
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** He then [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome manages to talk the Monster round anyway.]]

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** He His friends still refuse to let him out... and he then [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome manages to talk the Monster round anyway.]]
30th Apr '17 5:04:20 AM Vox
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-->"Let me out, let me out of here. Get me the hell out of here... What's the matter with you people?! I was ''joking!'' Don't you know a ''joke'' when you hear one?! HA-HA-HA-HA! (pounds on the door) Jesus Christ, get me out of here! Open this goddam door or I'll kick your rotten heads in!! MOMMY!!"

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-->"Let me out, let me out of here. Get me the hell out of here... What's the matter with you people?! I was ''joking!'' Don't you know a ''joke'' when you hear one?! HA-HA-HA-HA! (pounds on the door) Jesus Christ, get me out of here! Open this goddam goddamn door or I'll kick your rotten heads in!! MOMMY!!"MOMMY!!"
** He then [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome manages to talk the Monster round anyway.]]
20th Apr '17 2:47:34 AM SingtheRing
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* ''Series/SeaPatrol'' has Buffer trying to give up smoking in the pilot episode. He gives half a pack to Spider, the youngest crewman, and tells him not to give them back no matter what. Subverted in that Spider actually gives them to someone off the ship and thus can't give them back when Buffer wants them.
2nd Jan '17 7:31:29 AM N8han11
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** Actually, this happened at least twice. The first time, Linus handed his blanket to Charlie Brown, who gave in the moment Linus begged to have his blanket back. Snoopy, however, did ''not'' give in ''at all'' - thereby causing Linus to have a nervous breakdown.
*** Although [[spoiler: that time he actually kicked the habit - just in time for ''someone'' to buy him a new blanket and start the cycle over.]]



** Actually, Blight didn't ''forget'' to tell MAL what would be going on. She was just too mad at him to even consider letting him know the secret.
2nd Dec '16 8:06:46 PM lucy24
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* ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia The Silver Chair]]'': [[spoiler:Inverted. The Prince has to be tied to a chair because he's about to have an episode of madness, and he orders Puddleglum and the kids not to free him no matter what he says. Once tied up, he begs to be released in the name of Aslan. The protagonists let him loose, and it turns out that he was NotHimself ''before''; at the same hour every day when he is tied to the chair, he is in his right mind, and letting him go broke the [[{{Brainwashed}} spell]]]].

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* ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia The Silver Chair]]'': [[spoiler:Inverted.Inverted. The Prince has to be tied to a chair because he's about to have an episode of madness, and he orders Puddleglum and the kids not to free him no matter what he says. Once tied up, he begs to be released in [[spoiler:in the name of Aslan. The protagonists have to let him loose, and because they’ve previously been instructed to honor any request “in my (Aslan’s) name”. Correctly, it turns out that out, because he was NotHimself ''before''; at the same hour every day when he is tied to the chair, he is in his right mind, and letting him go broke the [[{{Brainwashed}} spell]]]].
22nd Nov '16 4:54:46 PM WillBGood
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* In ''ComicBook/{{Venom}}'', the Franchise/{{Batman}} realises he has become addicted to the eponymous drug and asks Alfred to lock him in the Batcave for a month. In a slight subversion, Alfred asks to let him out early, but Batman refuses. When he finally emerges, he's wearing the BeardOfSorrow, but is, nevertheless, magnificent.

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* In ''ComicBook/{{Venom}}'', ''Batman: Venom'', the Franchise/{{Batman}} realises he has become addicted to the eponymous drug and asks Alfred to lock him in the Batcave for a month. In a slight subversion, Alfred asks to let him out early, but Batman refuses. When he finally emerges, he's wearing the BeardOfSorrow, but is, nevertheless, magnificent.
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