History Main / NicknamingTheEnemy

27th Sep '16 4:37:13 PM DragonRanger
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* During the ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'', the Maximals would sometimes refer to the Predacons as "Preds".
14th Sep '16 6:34:01 PM PaulA
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** In the ''Earth Unaware'' prequel, the Venezuelan family of AsteroidMiners who first spot the Bugger ship and see the creatures face-to-"face" label them Hormigas ("ants" in Spanish). When they transmit the data to a corporate mining ship, the first scientist to see it immediately rejects the name, as it uses a living language. She immediately reclassifies them as "Formics" (the same thing but in Latin).

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** In the ''Earth Unaware'' ''Literature/EarthUnaware'' prequel, the Venezuelan family of AsteroidMiners who first spot the Bugger ship and see the creatures face-to-"face" label them Hormigas ("ants" in Spanish). When they transmit the data to a corporate mining ship, the first scientist to see it immediately rejects the name, as it uses a living language. She immediately reclassifies them as "Formics" (the same thing but in Latin).
8th Aug '16 1:54:18 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* In ''Franchise/{{Halo}},'' the marines call the Elites "split-lips."
** In fact, most alien names in the ''Halo'' universe fit this trope: Grunts, Jackals, Brutes, Elites, Hunters, Buggers, Grubs, and Prophets are all nicknames given by humans to refer to the separate races that compose the coalition of aliens they're at war with, or the call them covies as a whole. Even their vehicles (Ghosts, Wraiths, Banshees) are [[ReportingName nicknamed]].

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* In ''Franchise/{{Halo}},'' ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', the marines call the Elites "split-lips."
"split-lips" or "hinge-heads", and have plenty of derogatory names for the Covenant's other species too.
** In fact, most alien the species names in the ''Halo'' universe fit this trope: Grunts, Jackals, Brutes, Elites, Hunters, Buggers, Grubs, "Grunts", "Jackals", "Brutes", "Elites", "Hunters", "Drones", "Engineers", and Prophets "Prophets" are all nicknames given by humans to refer to the Covenant's separate races that compose races, with the coalition of aliens they're at war with, or the call them covies alien hegemony's members as a whole. whole referred to as "covies". Even their Covenant vehicles (Ghosts, Wraiths, Banshees) Banshees, etc.) are [[ReportingName nicknamed]].
10th Jun '16 4:57:22 PM Taxima
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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': the Clone would often call droids klankers.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': the Clone would often call droids klankers.klankers (for the clanking sound they make).
10th Jun '16 4:51:54 PM Taxima
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* The ace Nazi pilot antagonist in ''Film/RedTails'' is given the nickname "Pretty Boy" by the Red Tails, and no one ever learns his actual name.
10th Jun '16 4:50:03 PM Taxima
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Soldiers often come up with a name for the enemy that's easy to remember, usually quicker to say than their actual name. Sometimes this is a racial or ethnic slur (and in some cases becomes such a slur); sometimes it's a cultural reference, and sometimes refers to appearance. Doing so is commonly a form of {{Demonization}} and has the effect of 'Othering' the enemy, making them seem less human, thus keeping the troops from considering [[WhatMeasureIsAMook the enemy's humanity]], and thus making it easier for the troops to kill them. For that reason, the practice is often encouraged (or at least not discouraged) by the troops' superiors while the war's going on. In science fiction or fantasy settings, this is made even easier when the enemy is [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman not the same species as the troops]].

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Soldiers often come up with a name for the enemy that's easy to remember, usually quicker to say than their actual name.name (or if they never learn the enemy's name). Sometimes this is a racial or ethnic slur (and in some cases becomes such a slur); sometimes it's a cultural reference, and sometimes refers to appearance. Doing so is commonly a form of {{Demonization}} and has the effect of 'Othering' the enemy, making them seem less human, thus keeping the troops from considering [[WhatMeasureIsAMook the enemy's humanity]], and thus making it easier for the troops to kill them. For that reason, the practice is often encouraged (or at least not discouraged) by the troops' superiors while the war's going on. In science fiction or fantasy settings, this is made even easier when the enemy is [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman not the same species as the troops]].
7th Jun '16 9:05:29 AM Doug86
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* In WorldWarOne, the Germans were often called "Huns" by the Allies and "Fritz" by Russians.
** To some degree in WorldWarII as well, especially by British. The "Fritz" nickname was even more common during the [[WorldWarII Great Patriotic War]] than during the [[WorldWarI Imperialistic War]].
* Works made in (or to a lesser extent made later but set in) WorldWarTwo refer to Japanese as "Japs" or "Nips" (short for Nipponese), and Germans "Krauts," though some WorldWarOne vets may still call them the "Huns;" "Jerry" was another popular term. Calling Italians "Wops" also crops up whenever writers remember the Italians were even in the war. Even officially issued documents like "Know Your PT Boat" (US Navy Bureau of Ships Technical Publication No. 9) did this.

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* In WorldWarOne, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the Germans were often called "Huns" by the Allies and "Fritz" by Russians.
** To some degree in WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII as well, especially by British. The "Fritz" nickname was even more common during the [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Great Patriotic War]] than during the [[WorldWarI [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Imperialistic War]].
* Works made in (or to a lesser extent made later but set in) WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII refer to Japanese as "Japs" or "Nips" (short for Nipponese), and Germans "Krauts," though some WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI vets may still call them the "Huns;" "Jerry" was another popular term. Calling Italians "Wops" also crops up whenever writers remember the Italians were even in the war. Even officially issued documents like "Know Your PT Boat" (US Navy Bureau of Ships Technical Publication No. 9) did this.
2nd Apr '16 3:36:18 AM Shade21
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* In ArmA 3, the NATO troops on Altis and Stratis derogatively refer to the local armed forces, the AAF, as 'Greenbacks'. This doesn't help [[spoiler: when the AAF turn around and actively engage NATO forces on Stratis in an effort to push them off the island.]]
27th Feb '16 11:05:54 PM Seanette
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* ''Literature/WorldWarZ'': United States soldiers referred to the undead as Zack; in the United Kingdom and Europe, they called them Zed.

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* ''Literature/WorldWarZ'': United States soldiers referred to the undead as Zack; in the United Kingdom and Europe, they called them Zed. They're also referred to as "ghouls" or "G"s.
23rd Feb '16 1:43:27 PM ElectricBoogaloo
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** Done in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'', in which the Federation forces were termed "Fedies", and Zeon forces called "Zeeks".

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** Done in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'', in which the Federation forces were termed "Fedies", "Feddies", and Zeon forces called "Zeeks".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NicknamingTheEnemy