History Main / NeverMyFault

17th Mar '17 3:12:36 PM charliebiggs
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** [[SmugSnake Eddie Brock]] hates Peter for costing him the staff job at the ''Bugle''. Yeah, Peter may have been under the control of a symbiote that was making him act a bit differently, [[JerkassHasAPoint but there are consequences to framing a man for robbery and falsifying journalistic documents]], Eddie. Photoshop aside, why you thought it was a good idea to ​plagiarize the ''only other man in the city who takes pictures of Spider-Man'' was a good idea is anybody's guess (dollars to doughnuts he'd recognize his own freaking work). This is actually TruthInTelevision: people who plagiarize rarely admit that what they're doing is wrong, and/or tell themselves they're a special case.

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** [[SmugSnake Eddie Brock]] hates Peter for costing him the staff job at the ''Bugle''. Yeah, Peter may have been under the control of a symbiote that was making him act a bit differently, [[JerkassHasAPoint but there are consequences to framing a man for robbery and falsifying journalistic documents]], Eddie. Photoshop aside, why you thought it was a good idea to ​plagiarize plagiarize the ''only other man in the city who takes pictures of Spider-Man'' was a good idea is anybody's guess (dollars to doughnuts he'd recognize his own freaking work). This is actually TruthInTelevision: people who plagiarize rarely admit that what they're doing is wrong, and/or tell themselves they're a special case.
16th Mar '17 11:45:36 PM azul120
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** Ohgi holds resentment towards Zero for his abandonment during the Black Rebellion and subsequent one-year disappearance when he sells him out to Schneizel for Japan, yet never takes responsibility for his relationship with Villetta, the person linked to at least some degree with the two, or [[LoveMakesYouDumb his resulting carelessness]], and part of the reason Lelouch was missing, into account. Also, his deal, if successful, would have left not only Lelouch possibly dead, but the rest of the UFN up the creek without a paddle, so he's hardly one to talk about abandonment.
16th Mar '17 11:37:11 PM azul120
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The formal term for this is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-serving_bias "self-serving bias"]], and it is a key personality trait of TheSociopath.

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The formal term for this is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-serving_bias "self-serving bias"]], and it is a key personality trait of TheSociopath.
TheSociopath. (See also: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defensive_attribution_hypothesis "defensive attribution hypothesis"]].)



16th Mar '17 5:46:01 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** '''[[Creator/DavidTennant Kilgrave]]'''. Just Kilgrave. He has an uncanny ability to do this to just about every atrocity he commits/[[MindRape forces others to commit]]. He's under the impression that if he didn't physically force someone to do something (steal something, sleep with him, murder someone), it was ''their'' fault for doing it. Kilgrave's personality is an amalgamation of the behaviors of typical abusers - impulsiveness, short temper, blaming others for his actions, his total lack of understanding of consent or others' feelings, etc..

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** '''[[Creator/DavidTennant Kilgrave]]'''. Just Kilgrave. He [[Creator/DavidTennant Kilgrave]] has an uncanny ability to do this to just about every atrocity he commits/[[MindRape forces others to commit]]. He's under the impression that if he didn't physically force someone to do something (steal something, sleep with him, murder someone), it was ''their'' fault for doing it. Kilgrave's personality is an amalgamation of the behaviors of typical abusers - impulsiveness, short temper, blaming others for his actions, his total lack of understanding of consent or others' feelings, etc..
16th Mar '17 5:43:06 PM dmcreif
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* [[Creator/DavidTennant Kilgrave]] from ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', has an uncanny ability to do this to just about every atrocity he commits/[[MindRape forces others to commit]]. He's under the impression that if he didn't physically force someone to do something (steal something, sleep with him, murder someone), it was ''their'' fault for doing it. (TruthInTelevision, as Kilgrave's personality is an amalgamation of the behaviors of typical abusers - impulsiveness, short temper, blaming others for his actions, his total lack of understanding of consent or others' feelings, etc.) Though not shown as extensively, the same could be said of Dorothy Walker and Jeri Hogarth.

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* [[Creator/DavidTennant Kilgrave]] from ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', *''Series/JessicaJones2015'':
**'''[[Creator/DavidTennant Kilgrave]]'''. Just Kilgrave. He
has an uncanny ability to do this to just about every atrocity he commits/[[MindRape forces others to commit]]. He's under the impression that if he didn't physically force someone to do something (steal something, sleep with him, murder someone), it was ''their'' fault for doing it. (TruthInTelevision, as Kilgrave's personality is an amalgamation of the behaviors of typical abusers - impulsiveness, short temper, blaming others for his actions, his total lack of understanding of consent or others' feelings, etc.) Though not shown as extensively, the same could be said of etc..
**Trish Walker's abusive mom
Dorothy Walker and Jeri Hogarth.has a habit of this, too. The only times Dorothy does accepts blame for something is when she thinks it will benefit her, such as admitting to a drinking problem or being a terrible mother to guilt-trip her daughters. It quickly falls apart when people call her on it.



** The show's {{archenemy}}, a criminal named William Morgan "Pudface" Morgan, was disfigured in an accident he caused. However, the minute he sees [=RoboCop=], it's clear he blames Murphy for it and not himself.

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** The show's {{archenemy}}, a criminal named William Morgan "Pudface" Morgan, was disfigured in an accident he caused. However, the minute he sees [=RoboCop=], it's clear he blames Murphy for it and not himself.



** Flashbacks establish that Wilson Fisk's father was one of these kinds of people. Bill's idea of "making a man" out of Wilson involved demeaning him, teaching him to blame others for his problems (including blaming Wilson himself for his own problems) and playing cruel jokes on him. When he lost the city council election, he believed that the reason he lost the local election was because his wife and son didn't show him enough respect at home, not because he was a vile, vicious, petty loser. This led to him beating his wife with a belt, and caused Wilson to snap and kill him with a hammer.
** In the present day, Fisk tends to operate on the principle that he should do the opposite of what his father would do in a situation. As such he owns up to his mistakes and then moves on, eventually. In the season 1 finale, after Matt Murdock foils Fisk's attempt to escape from police custody, Fisk goes on a villainous rant, clearly blaming Matt for the downfall of his operation. While it is true that Matt was the driving force, both in his civilian and vigilante lives, behind Fisk getting arrested, this is ignoring that the major factors that led to his descent were due to his own temper tantrums for minor slights (to elaborate, a string of events that begins with Fisk brutally murdering Anatoly for simply crashing Fisk's date with Vanessa, which led to Fisk bombing the Russian mafia's hideouts, then sending in corrupt cops to finish off the survivors, then ordering the shooting of Detective Blake for accidentally leaking info to Matt, having Blake be killed in the hospital by his own partner Hoffman when this fails, Hoffman being stashed away by Leland Owlsley, then Hoffman selling Fisk out to the FBI after Fisk kills Leland in another tantrum).

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** Flashbacks establish that Wilson Fisk's father was one of these kinds of people. Bill's idea of "making a man" out of Wilson involved demeaning him, teaching him to blame others for his problems (including blaming Wilson himself for his own problems) and playing cruel jokes on him. When he lost the city council election, he believed that the reason he lost the local election was because his wife and son didn't show him enough respect at home, not because he was a vile, vicious, petty loser. This led to him beating his wife with a belt, and caused Wilson to snap and kill him with a hammer.
** In the present day, Fisk tends to operate on the principle that he should do the opposite of what his father would do in a situation. As such he owns up to his mistakes and then moves on, eventually. With one exception: In the season 1 finale, after Matt Murdock foils Fisk's attempt to escape from police custody, Fisk goes on a villainous rant, clearly blaming Matt for the downfall of his operation. While it is true that Matt was the driving force, both in his civilian and vigilante lives, behind Fisk getting arrested, this is ignoring that the major factors that led to his descent were due to his own temper tantrums for minor slights (to elaborate, a string of events that begins began with Fisk brutally murdering Anatoly Ranskahov for simply crashing Fisk's date with Vanessa, which led to Fisk bombing the Russian mafia's hideouts, then sending in corrupt cops to finish off the survivors, then ordering the shooting of Detective Blake for accidentally leaking info to Matt, having Blake be killed in the hospital by his own partner Hoffman when this fails, Hoffman being stashed away by Leland Owlsley, then Hoffman selling Fisk out to the FBI after Fisk kills Leland in another tantrum).


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14th Mar '17 2:17:31 PM Az_Tech341
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** In "Bart the Lover", Bart plays a prank on Mrs, Krabappel, which affects her more deeply than he expected, and comments "I can't help but feel partly responsible."

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** In "Bart the Lover", Bart plays a prank on Mrs, Mrs. Krabappel, which affects her more deeply than he expected, and comments "I can't help but feel partly responsible."
14th Mar '17 2:00:39 PM merotoker
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* The entire basis of Doctor Doom's vendetta against the Comicbook/FantasticFour is that he is unable to accept that Reed Richards was actually right when warning him of a critical error in his calculations during an experiment Doom was conducting. Doom dismissed Reed's warnings as [[YoureJustJealous jealousy]], only for the experiment to blow up in his face. The idea that Richards was correct -- and therefore, in Doom's eyes, smarter than him -- was so abhorrent to Doom that he concluded that Reed had deliberately sabotaged Doom's experiment, and so [[DisproportionateRetribution has attempted to creatively kill Richards and his family on numerous occasions]]. Even more jarring is that the retcon shows that Doom really was right and Richards was indeed wrong: the machine worked perfectly. It blew up because Doom used it to take a peek into {{Hell}}. With Doom it's more "Always [[Comicbook/FantasticFour Reed Richards']] Fault".

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* The entire basis of Doctor Doom's ComicBook/DoctorDoom's vendetta against the Comicbook/FantasticFour is that he is unable to accept that Reed Richards was actually right when warning him of a critical error in his calculations during an experiment Doom was conducting. Doom dismissed Reed's warnings as [[YoureJustJealous jealousy]], only for the experiment to blow up in his face. The idea that Richards was correct -- and therefore, in Doom's eyes, smarter than him -- was so abhorrent to Doom that he concluded that Reed had deliberately sabotaged Doom's experiment, and so [[DisproportionateRetribution has attempted to creatively kill Richards and his family on numerous occasions]]. Even more jarring is that the retcon shows that Doom really was right and Richards was indeed wrong: the machine worked perfectly. It blew up because Doom used it to take a peek into {{Hell}}. With Doom it's more "Always [[Comicbook/FantasticFour Reed Richards']] Fault".



* Despite SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}'s desire to help his fellow mutants and deliver them from persecution his actions have probably done more to hurt his cause (and harmed more mutants) than he has helped. Naturally, this is always humanity's fault. How far this goes, or if it applies at all, [[DependingOnTheWriter depends a lot on who is writing him]]. Most of the time he sees that he is culpable for what he did and is ready to do, but he feels [[WellIntentionedExtremist he has to do what is necessary, not what is morally right]]. Creator/ChrisClaremont brought this out in ''Uncanny X-Men'' #275, where he says "My people are in danger [...] and a kinder, gentler Magneto cannot save them", and where there is also this telling exchange with Colonel Semyanov, who betrayed him, Rogue and the forces of S.H.I.E.L.D. to the Big Bad, Zaladane, in order to get revenge on Magneto for killing his son 125 issues earlier:

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* Despite SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}'s ComicBook/{{Magneto}}'s desire to help his fellow mutants and deliver them from persecution his actions have probably done more to hurt his cause (and harmed more mutants) than he has helped. Naturally, this is always humanity's fault. How far this goes, or if it applies at all, [[DependingOnTheWriter depends a lot on who is writing him]]. Most of the time he sees that he is culpable for what he did and is ready to do, but he feels [[WellIntentionedExtremist he has to do what is necessary, not what is morally right]]. Creator/ChrisClaremont brought this out in ''Uncanny X-Men'' #275, where he says "My people are in danger [...] and a kinder, gentler Magneto cannot save them", and where there is also this telling exchange with Colonel Semyanov, who betrayed him, Rogue and the forces of S.H.I.E.L.D. to the Big Bad, Zaladane, in order to get revenge on Magneto for killing his son 125 issues earlier:



* ''ComicBook/AvengersTheInitiative'': [[ObstructiveBureaucrat Henry Gyrich]], all the way. When a student at a super-hero training camp is killed in a training exercise, one he oversaw, Gyrich buries all knowledge of it, has the student dissected in order to work out how he got his superpowers ([[BadassNormal Which he didn't actually have]]), and has the kid cloned repeatedly, eventually resulting in one going utterly psychotic, rampaging about the base, killing several people and graphically wounding several others. Gyrich's response? It's not his fault, and he doesn't deserve to be dragged over the coals for it. Iron Man [[LaserGuidedKarma disagrees, and has him fired]].

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* ''ComicBook/AvengersTheInitiative'': [[ObstructiveBureaucrat Henry Gyrich]], all the way. When a student at a super-hero training camp is killed in a training exercise, one he oversaw, Gyrich buries all knowledge of it, has the student dissected in order to work out how he got his superpowers ([[BadassNormal Which he didn't actually have]]), and has the kid cloned repeatedly, eventually resulting in one going utterly psychotic, rampaging about the base, killing several people and graphically wounding several others. Gyrich's response? It's not his fault, and he doesn't deserve to be dragged over the coals for it. Iron Man ComicBook/IronMan [[LaserGuidedKarma disagrees, and has him fired]].



* There have been quite a few ''Literature/HarryPotter'' fanfics written from the point of view of the Slytherin students. Very often in these stories, the Slytherins view themselves as the victims of injustice, of rampant "anti-Slytherin prejudice." The fact that people dislike or distrust the Slytherins ''never'' seems to be the Slytherins' fault for being bigots, bullies, or otherwise openly cruel and hostile to other students, [[FantasticRacism particularly Muggle-borns]].
** The real kicker is that [[MisaimedFandom the writers of these stories (and their supporters)]] [[DracoInLeatherPants actually seem to believe that the Slytherins are right]]. No matter how horribly the Slytherins behave, the writers always seem to attribute any display of animosity toward them to "anti-Slytherin prejudice."

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* There have been quite a few ''Literature/HarryPotter'' fanfics written from the point of view of the Slytherin students. Very often in these stories, the Slytherins view themselves as the victims of injustice, of rampant "anti-Slytherin prejudice." The fact that people dislike or distrust the Slytherins ''never'' seems to be the Slytherins' fault for being bigots, bullies, or otherwise openly cruel and hostile to other students, [[FantasticRacism particularly Muggle-borns]].
**
Muggle-borns]]. The real kicker is that [[MisaimedFandom the writers of these stories (and their supporters)]] [[DracoInLeatherPants actually seem to believe that the Slytherins are right]]. No matter how horribly the Slytherins behave, the writers always seem to attribute any display of animosity toward them to "anti-Slytherin prejudice."



* This is a common phenomenon in the Literature/DiaryOfAWimpyKid series, but "Rodrick Rules" has the distinction of having it happen twice on one page. When Mom dances during the recording of [[BigBrotherBully Rodrick's]] band session at the talent show, thus depriving him of his chance to show his performance to record companies, Rodrick calls her out. She just responds that [[LogicalFallacy he shouldn't play music if he doesn't want people to dance]]. Rodrick then blames the recording fiasco on Greg for not taping the show for him, only for Greg to reply that he would have done it if Rodrick wasn't such a JerkAss.

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* This is a common phenomenon in the Literature/DiaryOfAWimpyKid series, ''Literature/DiaryOfAWimpyKid series'', but "Rodrick Rules" has the distinction of having it happen twice on one page. When Mom dances during the recording of [[BigBrotherBully Rodrick's]] band session at the talent show, thus depriving him of his chance to show his performance to record companies, Rodrick calls her out. She just responds that [[LogicalFallacy he shouldn't play music if he doesn't want people to dance]]. Rodrick then blames the recording fiasco on Greg for not taping the show for him, only for Greg to reply that he would have done it if Rodrick wasn't such a JerkAss.



** The Napoleon character (mentioned in conversation) has a rather blatant form of this. He's quoted as having been pacing around his house, repeating "It was Soult's fault. It was Ney's fault. It was Josephine's fault. It was the fault of the English. It was the fault of the Russians." [[TruthInTelevision Which is captures in a nutshell]] the way [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]] blamed all his defeats and failures on his subordinates in the memoirs he dictated to his companions Las Cases, Montholon and Gourgaud on St. Helena. Even those of his admirers who take that at face value have to point out that it generally was Napoleon himself who appointed those subordinates and put them in the position where they allegedly did so much damage.

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** The Napoleon character (mentioned in conversation) has a rather blatant form of this. He's quoted as having been pacing around his house, repeating "It was Soult's fault. It was Ney's fault. It was Josephine's fault. It was the fault of the English. It was the fault of the Russians." [[TruthInTelevision Which is captures in a nutshell]] the way [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]] blamed all his defeats and failures on his subordinates in the memoirs he dictated to his companions Las Cases, Montholon and Gourgaud on St. Helena. Even those of his admirers who take that at face value have to point out that it generally was Napoleon himself who appointed those subordinates and put them in the position where they allegedly did so much damage.






* In episode 8 of ''TheMusketeers'', the Red Guard were quick to pin the blame of their captain's death on the Musketeers for not helping them, despite the Musketeers warning them that the prisoner Labarge wasn't to be taken lightly and it was the resulting fight between Labarge and the Red Guard that led to a Guard accidentally killing the captain.

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* In episode 8 of ''TheMusketeers'', ''Series/TheMusketeers'', the Red Guard were quick to pin the blame of their captain's death on the Musketeers for not helping them, despite the Musketeers warning them that the prisoner Labarge wasn't to be taken lightly and it was the resulting fight between Labarge and the Red Guard that led to a Guard accidentally killing the captain.



* Laurel Lance in Season 2 ''Series/{{Arrow}}''. She blames everything wrong in her life -- her drug addiction, her alcoholism, her abusing her authority at her job, her poor performance at the same and her only being spared arrest on charges of stealing her cop father's pain medication and DUI due to his influence (though she is still fired after trying to use her position to get out of said DUI) -- on her ex-boyfriend Oliver Queen and sister Sara Lance. She gets better about this later, however.

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* Laurel Lance in Season 2 of ''Series/{{Arrow}}''. She blames everything wrong in her life -- her drug addiction, her alcoholism, her abusing her authority at her job, her poor performance at the same and her only being spared arrest on charges of stealing her cop father's pain medication and DUI due to his influence (though she is still fired after trying to use her position to get out of said DUI) -- on her ex-boyfriend Oliver Queen and sister Sara Lance. She gets better about this later, however.



** Thomas also fits this. In life, when he was married to Edith's neice, he literally tortured her and slept with other women in her bed ''while she was in it''. He eventually accepts that he might bear 3% of the responsibility for the divorce. Scumspawn then notes that it's 3% up from last time. In another episode, he [[DidYouJustFlipOffCthulhu complains to God]] that it isn't fair to place him in Hell when his actions were predetermined by God. God then informs him that he didn't predestine anything and Thomas' actions were of his own free will. Thomas insists that [[InsaneTrollLogic it's still God's fault for being stupid enough to give people like him free will.]]

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** Thomas also fits this. In life, when he was married to Edith's neice, niece, he literally tortured her and slept with other women in her bed ''while she was in it''. He eventually accepts that he might bear 3% of the responsibility for the divorce. Scumspawn then notes that it's 3% up from last time. In another episode, he [[DidYouJustFlipOffCthulhu complains to God]] that it isn't fair to place him in Hell when his actions were predetermined by God. God then informs him that he didn't predestine anything and Thomas' actions were of his own free will. Thomas insists that [[InsaneTrollLogic it's still God's fault for being stupid enough to give people like him free will.]]



* Mark Rosewater, lead designer of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', is on record as saying that building a "NeverMyFault" safety valve into games is a smart idea. (In the case of ''Magic'', it's how the RandomNumberGod controls what you draw -- specifically, whether you have enough Lands to give you the {{Mana}} you need for your spells.) Why? Because, if it's not your fault you lost, then you feel more enthusiastic about ignoring your loss and playing again. And that's a good quality to have in a high-skill-emphasis game where new players are probably ''going'' to lose most of the time. Established players have argued fiercely against this philosophy, but the success of ''Magic'' itself -- not to mention of other games that have this safety valve, like {{Multiplayer Online Battle Arena}}s and their random matchmaking -- seems to lend credence to Rosewater's case.

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* Mark Rosewater, lead designer of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', is on record as saying that building a "NeverMyFault" "Never My Fault" safety valve into games is a smart idea. (In the case of ''Magic'', it's how the RandomNumberGod controls what you draw -- specifically, whether you have enough Lands to give you the {{Mana}} you need for your spells.) Why? Because, if it's not your fault you lost, then you feel more enthusiastic about ignoring your loss and playing again. And that's a good quality to have in a high-skill-emphasis game where new players are probably ''going'' to lose most of the time. Established players have argued fiercely against this philosophy, but the success of ''Magic'' itself -- not to mention of other games that have this safety valve, like {{Multiplayer Online Battle Arena}}s and their random matchmaking -- seems to lend credence to Rosewater's case.



* Ollie from ''Webcomic/SomethingPositive'' considers Davan to be his ArchEnemy, [[UnknownRival much to Davan's confusion]]. Ollie claims that Davan is the reason his theater career never took off, despite the fact that Ollie's big attempt was to put on a play that he hadn't paid the rights to. Davan was involved in the production, but didn't realize that Ollie was breaking copright law; Ollie's apparently just mad that Davan managed to bounce back from the experience (being hired by the play's would-be sponsor) while he actually had to face the consequences of his actions.

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* Ollie from ''Webcomic/SomethingPositive'' considers Davan to be his ArchEnemy, [[UnknownRival much to Davan's confusion]]. Ollie claims that Davan is the reason his theater career never took off, despite the fact that Ollie's big attempt was to put on a play that he hadn't paid the rights to. Davan was involved in the production, but didn't realize that Ollie was breaking copright copyright law; Ollie's apparently just mad that Davan managed to bounce back from the experience (being hired by the play's would-be sponsor) while he actually had to face the consequences of his actions.



** In the episode "Journey to the Center of Carl", the other kids (mainly Cindy and Libby), blame Jimmy for his sick patch asorbing into their skin even though ''they'' were the ones who asked for it in the first place.

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** In the episode "Journey to the Center of Carl", the other kids (mainly Cindy and Libby), blame Jimmy for his sick patch asorbing absorbing into their skin even though ''they'' were the ones who asked for it in the first place.



* In ''WesternAnimation/MoralOrel'', Clay Puppington practically lives by shifting blame. In one episode, he teaches Orel the same (thankfully, Orel didn't keep that lesson for long). Orel counsels Principal Fakey to do the same, regarding Fakey's infidelity. This extends to claiming he's been faithful and accusing his wife of cheating on him and giving him gonorrhea, while he's having sex with the woman who gave the disease, as she tells him it's not that bad. He then states there's no decency in the world and goes home from school to throw her out. With his pants around his ankles the whole way. Clay's penchant for this trope goes so far that he blames Orel when [[spoiler: Clay ''shot him'' in a drunken state. It's hard to say which is worse, the victim blaming, or that the only time he admitted to shooting Orel, he claimed to be ''glad'' about it.]]

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* In ''WesternAnimation/MoralOrel'', Clay Puppington practically lives by shifting blame. In one episode, he teaches Orel the same (thankfully, Orel didn't keep that lesson for long). Orel counsels Principal Fakey to do the same, regarding Fakey's infidelity. This extends to claiming he's been faithful and accusing his wife of cheating on him and giving him gonorrhea, while he's having sex with the woman who gave the disease, as she tells him it's not that bad. He then states there's no decency in the world and goes home from school to throw her out. With his pants around his ankles the whole way. Clay's penchant for this trope goes so far that he blames Orel when [[spoiler: Clay ''shot him'' in a drunken state. It's hard to say which is worse, the victim blaming, or that the only time he admitted to shooting Orel, he claimed to be ''glad'' about it.]]it]].



** In "Bart the Lover", Bart plays a prank on Mrs Krabappel, which affects her more deeply than he expected, and comments "I can't help but feel partly responsible."

to:

** In "Bart the Lover", Bart plays a prank on Mrs Mrs, Krabappel, which affects her more deeply than he expected, and comments "I can't help but feel partly responsible."



** When Buttercup is called out by Blossom for making fun of Elmer Sglue for his [[TrademarkFavoriteFood obsession with ingesting paste]] in "Paste Makes Waste", Buttercup simply responds with "Why am I the one always blamed for things around here?"

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** When Buttercup is called out by Blossom for making fun of Elmer Sglue for his [[TrademarkFavoriteFood [[PasteEater obsession with ingesting paste]] in "Paste Makes Waste", Buttercup simply responds with "Why am I the one always blamed for things around here?"



* Livewire's origin as a villain in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' is a result of this when she, as a Superman-bashing ShockJock, decided to host a party in the middle of a nasty thunderstorm. Superman literally saves her life by preventing her from being struck by lightning, but she gains her electrical powers in the process. She, of course, blames Supers for "ruining" her life.
** ​Also plays a part in Luminus' origin. As [=LexCorp=] employee Edward Lytener, he gave Lois Lane information on the company's unethical acts (which cost him his job) not because it was right, but to get her to notice him. When she didn't, he decided to kill her. When stopped by Superman, he turned his murderous attention to the hero for "making a mockery of [him] and [his] work." Yes, Eddie, it's totally Lois's fault you got fired and she won't date you. And how dare Supes stop you from burning her to a crisp with lasers?

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* ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries''
**
Livewire's origin as a villain in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' is a result of this when she, as a Superman-bashing ShockJock, decided to host a party in the middle of a nasty thunderstorm. Superman literally saves her life by preventing her from being struck by lightning, but [[LightningCanDoAnything she gains her electrical powers in the process.process]]. She, of course, blames Supers for "ruining" her life.
** ​Also Also plays a part in Luminus' origin. As [=LexCorp=] employee Edward Lytener, he gave Lois Lane information on the company's unethical acts (which cost him his job) not because it was right, but to get her to notice him. When she didn't, he decided to kill her. When stopped by Superman, he turned his murderous attention to the hero for "making a mockery of [him] and [his] work." Yes, Eddie, it's totally Lois's fault you got fired and she won't date you. And how dare Supes stop you from burning her to a crisp with lasers?
12th Mar '17 12:36:05 AM TheSinful
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* Samurai in ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11803928/2/Challenger Challenger]]'' yells at Ash because Ash's Sandile broke his katana, conveniently ignoring that he woke up Ash by pointing said katana at his neck.
9th Mar '17 12:23:49 AM CaptainTedium
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** In "Rupert and the Hedgehog", Rupert ends up carving his father's topiary of a camel into a small hedgehog after his friend Bill Badger ruined it by trying to make changes to it. Bill frequently tries to pin the blame for his actions on Rupert, much to the young bear's ire.
8th Mar '17 2:05:15 PM slvstrChung
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* Mark Rosewater, lead designer of ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', is on record as saying that building a "NeverMyFault" safety valve into games is a smart idea. (In the case of ''Magic'', it's how the RandomNumberGod controls what you draw -- specifically, whether you have enough Lands to give you the {{Mana}} you need for your spells.) Why? Because, if it's not your fault you lost, then you feel more enthusiastic about ignoring your loss and playing again. And that's a good quality to have in a high-skill-emphasis game where new players are probably ''going'' to lose most of the time. Established players have argued fiercely against this philosophy, but the success of ''Magic'' itself -- not to mention of other games that have this safety valve, like {{Multiplayer Online Battle Arena}}s and their random matchmaking -- seems to lend credence to Rosewater's case.



* ''Theatre/IntoTheWoods'' has a song named [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "Your Fault"]], which involves all the 'heroes' placing the blame for the DarkerAndEdgier second act on each other. ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AK2FVhr9l3A&feature=fvwrel See here]]). The witch proceeds to [[WhatTheHellHero call all of them out on their behavior]] in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome {{The Reason You Suck|Speech}} [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xp_ywtm7wLY Song]], particularly after they tried blaming her for everything that happened.

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* ''Theatre/IntoTheWoods'' has a song named [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "Your Fault"]], which involves all the 'heroes' placing the blame for the DarkerAndEdgier second act on each other. ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AK2FVhr9l3A&feature=fvwrel See here]]). The witch proceeds to [[WhatTheHellHero call all of them out on their behavior]] in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome {{The Reason You Suck|Speech}} [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xp_ywtm7wLY Song]], particularly after they tried all settle on blaming her ''her'' for everything that happened.everything.



* Zachary Hale Comstock, the BigBad of ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' has severe trouble facing his own guilt, to the point that this is arguably his most defining trait. [[spoiler: He only ''exists'' because he's a version of the main character that accepted baptism and created a new identity to bury his guilt over Wounded Knee.]] Driving the point home further, [[spoiler: Burial at Sea features an alternate Comstock who accidentally killed Elizabeth when he tried to take her from her own world, and then had the Luteces move him to another world so that he could escape his guilt over that, too.]]

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* Zachary Hale Comstock, the BigBad of ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' has severe trouble facing his own guilt, to the point that this is arguably his most defining trait. [[spoiler: He only ''exists'' because he's a version of the main character that accepted baptism and created a new identity to bury his guilt over war crimes committed at Wounded Knee.]] Driving the point home further, [[spoiler: Burial at Sea features an alternate Comstock who accidentally killed Elizabeth when he tried to take her from her own world, and then had the Luteces move him to another world so that he could escape his guilt over that, too.]]



* ''VideGame/GodOfWarSeries'' has this going on on both sides. Kratos relentlessly rages against everyone and their grandmother for tricking him into brutally murdering everything in sight at the drop of a hat while the gods refuse to admit their culpability in actually manipulating Kratos in the first place, deceiving him about the rewards for following their orders and generally being the {{jerkass|Gods}}es they've always been, resulting in most them having the crap murdered out of them. On the other side, Kratos refuses to accept that everything that's happened to him is because he made a deal with Ares, instead blaming every single that happens on the Gods even if it's something they didn't actually cause.

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* ''VideGame/GodOfWarSeries'' has this going on on both sides. Kratos relentlessly rages against everyone and their grandmother for tricking him into brutally murdering everything in sight at the drop of a hat while the gods hat. The gods, who successfully tricked him thusly, refuse to admit their culpability in actually manipulating Kratos in the first place, culpability, not to mention deceiving him about the rewards for following their orders and generally being the {{jerkass|Gods}}es they've always been, resulting in most them having the crap murdered out of them. On the other side, Kratos refuses to accept that everything that's happened to him is because he made a deal with Ares, instead blaming every single that happens on the Gods even if it's something they didn't actually cause.



** The main issue the party has with Luke [[spoiler:unwittingly destroying Akzeriuth]] is his refusal to accept responsibility for it. Once he realizes that he is responsible and [[HeroicVow vows to]] [[ImportantHaircut change]] [[CharacterDevelopment himself]] and [[TheAtoner make amends]], the party begins to forgive him, some more quickly than others. After they've had time to cool down and think things over, the team actually realizes that unlike Luke, they were more aware of the situation and in a better position to stop it. That's why they decide to give him a second chance. By the time the team is all together again, the only person who's blaming him for "the incident" is Luke himself.

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** The main issue the party has with Luke [[spoiler:unwittingly destroying Akzeriuth]] is his refusal to accept responsibility for it. Once he realizes that he is responsible and [[HeroicVow vows to]] [[ImportantHaircut change]] [[CharacterDevelopment himself]] and [[TheAtoner make amends]], the party begins to forgive him, some more quickly than others. After Additionally, after they've had time to cool down and think things over, the team actually realizes admits that unlike they ''could'' have stopped Luke, they were being more aware of the situation and than a kid who has spent the most important years of his life locked in a better position to stop it.his parents' mansion. That's why they decide to give him a second chance. By the time the team is all together again, the only person who's blaming him for "the incident" is Luke himself.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NeverMyFault