History Main / NeverASelfMadeWoman

9th Oct '17 12:53:36 PM AlleyOop
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''In a cast [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters with many characters]] there is a tendency to give any female character of importance a male character to thank for her position.''

The author or the characters have to choose who gets to join in on the hijinks or know the secrets; chances are, because MostWritersAreMale, most of the people they choose are going to be men. Women who join in are most commonly there as a "bonus" to someone else, often as a love interest or a family member. She's usually someone's sister, girlfriend or love interest. If she's a military or political leader of some sort, then you can bet that she got the position with help from her father or another male relative.

There are shades to this. We may have the woman who has achieved a lot in her field (whatever it may be) and gone up in society, but whenever her background is brought up, it is always a man in her family (father, uncle, older brother or husband) who is prominent as her predecessor or a key to her success. It will be strongly implied that she would never have gotten into this Business if she hadn't been motivated and trained by her powerful male relatives who [[DungeonmastersGirlfriend are active on the same field]]. In short, a personal, emotional relationship with a mentor is needed, not just a professional one driven by her own independent ambitions. She might have grown into her own badassery, but the story will continue to define her as the more important male character's apprentice or heiress.

A perceived "barrier between the sexes" may be to blame for this -- specifically, the notion that women and men can't socialize without justifying it with a sexual or familial bond. Writers use this trope to justify to viewers (presumed male) why they should care about the female character at all.

In short, this is another example of DoubleStandard. Of course, this tends to lead to a double bind situation in which people will discredit a woman's accomplishments because she is connected to a man.

!!Please note that this trope is more subtle than DungeonmastersGirlfriend and other similar tropes. Chances are that most of the examples here do get some credit for their accomplishments; that doesn't negate that their fathers, boyfriends, etc. are more important than they are.

'''Please don't add any [[AvertedTrope "aversions"]] to the example list. Unless the trope is near omnipresent, examples where it's not used are not "aversions". For more info, see the AvertedTrope page.'''

'''Also note that male characters owing their success to more powerful women are generally not [[InvertedTrope "inversions"]] of this trope, unless the setting carries the same implications (women are expected to be self-made while men are not).'''

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''In a cast [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters with many characters]] there This is an insidious trope where a tendency to give any female character character's success is undermined by the narrative of importance a male character to thank providing advantages necessary for her position.''

The author or the characters have to choose who gets to join in on the hijinks or know the secrets; chances are, because MostWritersAreMale, most of the people they choose are going to be men. Women who join in are most commonly there as a "bonus" to someone else, often as a love interest or a family member.
them. She's usually framed as someone's sister, girlfriend or love interest. If And if she's a military or political leader of some sort, then you can bet that she got the position with help from her father or another male relative.

There are shades to this. We may have the woman who has achieved a lot in
relative. The story implies her field (whatever it may be) membership is due to motivation and gone up in society, but whenever her background is brought up, it is always a man in her family (father, uncle, older brother or husband) who is prominent as her predecessor or a key to her success. It will be strongly implied that she would never have gotten into this Business if she hadn't been motivated and trained training by her powerful male relatives who [[DungeonmastersGirlfriend are active on the same field]]. field. In short, a personal, emotional relationship with a mentor is needed, not just a professional one driven by her own independent ambitions. She might have grown into her own badassery, ambitions.

This character stands in contrast to SelfMadeMan, where a character ([[AlwaysMale usually male]],
but the story not always) was able to accomplish goals well beyond their advantages. In short, this is another example of DoubleStandard. Due to stereotypes about separate gender roles, writers will continue to define her as the more important male character's apprentice or heiress.

A perceived "barrier between the sexes" may be to blame for this -- specifically, the notion that women and men can't socialize without justifying it with a sexual or familial bond. Writers
often use this trope to justify to viewers (presumed male) why they should care about the female character at all.

In short, this
all, as it is another example of DoubleStandard. Of course, this tends to lead to a double bind situation in which people will discredit a woman's accomplishments because she is connected to a man.

!!Please note that this trope is more subtle than DungeonmastersGirlfriend and other similar tropes. Chances are that most of
assumed the examples here do get some credit female character would not have taken an interest had it not been for their accomplishments; that doesn't negate that their fathers, boyfriends, etc. are more important than they are.

'''Please don't add any [[AvertedTrope "aversions"]] to
the example list. Unless the trope is near omnipresent, examples where it's not used are not "aversions". For more info, see the AvertedTrope page.'''

'''Also note
presence of that male characters owing their success to more powerful women are generally not [[InvertedTrope "inversions"]] of this trope, unless the setting carries the same implications (women are expected to be self-made while men are not).'''
character.



Not to be confused with SelfMadeMan where a person gains importance on his/her own. See also MostWritersAreMale. If a character gets DemotedToExtra after becoming someone's LoveInterest, it's DemotedToSatelliteLoveInterest.

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Not Keep in mind that [[IThoughtItMeant this is not]] the strict inverse of SelfMadeWoman and does not apply to be confused with SelfMadeMan where every instance of a person gains importance on his/her own. See also MostWritersAreMale. If a female character gets DemotedToExtra after becoming someone's LoveInterest, being helped by a male friend, relative, or love interest to reach her position. Rather, the male character must be implied to be more important to the plot or setting than the female character is, and the main force responsible for her position (e.g. the token female of the squad is a skilled soldier, but she's introduced as "the general's daughter" first and foremost).

'''Please don't add any [[AvertedTrope "aversions"]] to the example list. Unless the trope is near omnipresent, examples where
it's DemotedToSatelliteLoveInterest.
not used are not "aversions". For more info, see the AvertedTrope page.'''

'''Also note that male characters owing their success to more powerful women are generally not [[InvertedTrope "inversions"]] of this trope, unless the setting carries the same implications (women are expected to be self-made while men are not).'''

16th Sep '17 1:04:01 PM Eagal
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* Inverted in ''Manga/{{Jackals}}'' where Alligator Nichol, ''[[TheHero the main character]]'', owes the mastery of his massive two-handed blade to his mother, Roxy the Grim Reaper. Yes. He's a total badass but he's been trained by a woman. In fact, the whole story seems to make it a point to subvert this trope to hell and back when it comes to female characters. Only the resident DamselInDistress plays the trope straight.



* ''Manga/TheLegendOfMotherSarah'' averts and inverts the trope. The story features a female protagonist whose relevance to the plot has nothing to do with her being the wife/sister/daughter of a male protagonist. In fact, her son Harato, a rebellion leader, is actually relevant to the story because she is in it, not the other way around.



** This trope is even inverted in season 7, where Barney's character is appropriated as Robin's love interest, and his main significance is to be a source of angst for Robin. This makes the single brief look at his perspective in "Tick, Tick, Tick" all the more heartbreaking, as the audience knows that while Robin is busy going through character development and struggling with her personal conflicts, Barney is miserably and silently OutOfFocus, waiting for her to address her relationship with him.



* Inverted on ''Series/{{MASH}}''. Major Houlihan has had many friendships and affairs with powerful, successful men. But in the episode "Stars and Stripes" she makes it extremely clear that she never accepted any kind of help from them or from her father, Col. "Howitzer" Houlihan, when it came to her military career. Her dad was a role model to her, but nothing more. She earned her rank through hard work and dedication.

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* Inverted Defied on ''Series/{{MASH}}''. Major Houlihan has had many friendships and affairs with powerful, successful men. But in the episode "Stars and Stripes" she makes it extremely clear that she never accepted any kind of help from them or from her father, Col. "Howitzer" Houlihan, when it came to her military career. Her dad was a role model to her, but nothing more. She earned her rank through hard work and dedication.



** Inverted in one episode where Lisa laments that since her father Homer is kind of an idiot, she fears that she'll ultimately fail in life due to his genes...or something. So, he gathers up relatives from all over the country and finds that the female members of the family, and only the female members, have intelligent, fulfilling careers. Homer and Bart are crestfallen...but then quickly accept the fact that most of the male line are thickheaded idiots. They even participate in a headbutting contest. Yeah, it was a weird episode. One made all the more confusing by the show's NegativeContinuity. Herbert Powell, Homer's half-brother, is a flat out success in business twice over. Also, Homer has proven to be a successful song-writer and Bart has been shown numerous times to [[BrilliantButLazy have potential for success that is usually hindered by his laziness]].



* Inverted in ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': Katara accompanies Aang because she wants to learn waterbending and Sokka comes along because he feels he needs to a) protect his sister and b) help the Avatar defeat the fire nation. In the second season it's completely averted by Mai, Toph, and Ty Lee as all three are expressly defying their family's wishes by going on adventures (though it could be argued that Mai's relationship with Zuko eventually plays this straight). The only case in which this trope is played straight is with [[TheDragon Azula]] who is following in [[BigBad her father's]] footsteps, although even this is pretty downplayed, as for most of the series Azula [[MagnificentBitch is shown to be a much more proactive villain that Ozai.]]
16th Sep '17 1:00:21 PM Eagal
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** Actually partially [[AvertedTrope averted]] with Lulu, as much or even more of a reason for her coldness than the death of Chappu, is from failing as a guardian to protect the life of her first summoner, Lady Ginnem, and Lulu's character development is also in a large part triggered by her resolving her problems with Lady Ginnem, and sending her spirit to rest. This trope is also argubly [[InvertedTrope inverted]] with Seymour, who's path [[spoiler:towards villainy]] was all set, or at least increadibly infuenced by his mother and her sacrifice.
** It's also arguble if Yunalesca even fully counts as trope. Yes, her fame and influece are partly connected to her being the daughter of Yu Yevon, but it also was she who created the method of defeating Sin(creating the Final Aeon), as well as being the first to defeat Sin, as well as had a significant role [[PathOfInspiration in creating and spreading of the Yevonite beliefs]]. Argubly, she was as much important in the forming of Yevonite religion as her father, if not even more so, seeing Yu Yevon [[spoiler: was basically rendered into a mindless entity behind Sin, his "mind" being now closer to computer program, rather than having a reall conciousness for over a millennium.]]
1st Sep '17 3:30:21 AM HalcyonDayz
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** And, of course, when you have a ''male'' relative of a main character who doesn't live on 'Deep Space 9', they also tend to remain minor. In fact, Quark's mom gets a ''much'' bigger role than Sisko's dad. It's not quite the same as it would be if all the men on the command staff got there by their own merit and Jadzia and Kira were there because their dads were generals who'd arranged it or something.

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** And, of course, when you have a ''male'' relative of a main character who doesn't live on 'Deep ''Deep Space 9', 9'', they also tend to remain minor. In fact, Quark's mom gets a ''much'' bigger role than Sisko's dad. It's not quite the same as it would be if all the men on the command staff got there by their own merit and Jadzia and Kira were there because their dads were generals who'd arranged it or something.
1st Sep '17 3:28:17 AM HalcyonDayz
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** And, of course, when you have a ''male'' relative of a main character who doesn't live on DS9, they also tend to remain minor. In fact, Quark's mom gets a ''much'' bigger role than Sisko's dad. It's not quite the same as it would be if all the men on the command staff got there by their own merit and Jadzia and Kira were there because their dads were generals who'd arranged it or something.

to:

** And, of course, when you have a ''male'' relative of a main character who doesn't live on DS9, 'Deep Space 9', they also tend to remain minor. In fact, Quark's mom gets a ''much'' bigger role than Sisko's dad. It's not quite the same as it would be if all the men on the command staff got there by their own merit and Jadzia and Kira were there because their dads were generals who'd arranged it or something.
26th Aug '17 1:24:22 PM RedScharlach
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** Played straight with Susan Sto Helit. Her being Death's granddaughter is her most defining trait and the biggest reason of what makes her extraordinary and a relevant character... but then Death is somewhat genderless, so...
* Apart from Galadriel, the women of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' fall into this. Rosie, Goldberry and Arwen all function as LoveInterests for male characters, and while Éowyn breaks out of the mold eventually, she's introduced as the dutiful niece of Théoden and a potential {{Love Interest|s}} for Aragorn. She also eventually ends up with Faramir.Still, Galadriel is a hell of an aversion, and her husband is something of an inversion. Quick: without looking it up, what was his name? Thought so. The one line the poor schmuck got in the films was to ask where Gandalf is, and Galadriel corrects him without even bothering to make eye contact.

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** Played straight with Susan Sto Helit. Her being Death's granddaughter is her most defining trait and the biggest reason of what that makes her extraordinary and a relevant character... but then Death is somewhat genderless, so...
* Apart from Galadriel, the women of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' fall into this. Rosie, Goldberry and Arwen all function as LoveInterests for male characters, and while Éowyn breaks out of the mold eventually, she's introduced as the dutiful niece of Théoden and a potential {{Love Interest|s}} for Aragorn. She also eventually ends up with Faramir. Still, Galadriel is a hell of an aversion, and her husband is something of an inversion. Quick: without looking it up, what was his name? Thought so. The one line the poor schmuck got in the films was to ask where Gandalf is, and Galadriel corrects him without even bothering to make eye contact.



** Rosalie's defining character trait throughout most of the books is that she is jealous that she does not have Edward's affections. Her backstory, revealed in ''Eclipse'', is that she was gang raped by her fiancé and his male friends. In the ''Twilight Illustrated Guide'', we find out that the main reasons she became a vampire was because Carlisle had hoped she would be a wife for Edward.

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** Rosalie's defining character trait throughout most of the books is that she is jealous that she does not have Edward's affections. Her backstory, revealed in ''Eclipse'', is that she was gang raped by her fiancé and his male friends. In the ''Twilight Illustrated Guide'', we find out that the main reasons reason she became a vampire was because Carlisle had hoped she would be a wife for Edward.



** Kim, Claire, and Emily are only introduced in the story to be the imprintees/ LoveInterests of Jared, Quil, and Sam respectively. [[spoiler:This goes double for Renesmee, who from ''birth'' was used as a way to solve the Bella/Edward/Jacob love triangle.]] Leah also spends the entire series being defined by being the bitchy ex-fiance of Sam.

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** Kim, Claire, and Emily are only introduced in into the story to be the imprintees/ LoveInterests imprintees[=/=]LoveInterests of Jared, Quil, and Sam respectively. [[spoiler:This goes double for Renesmee, who from ''birth'' was used as a way to solve the Bella/Edward/Jacob love triangle.]] Leah also spends the entire series being defined by being the bitchy ex-fiance of Sam.



* ''Series/That70sShow'' had three major female characters. Donna and Jackie was either dating or fought over by the boys, and Kitty is Eric's mom.

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* ''Series/That70sShow'' had three major female characters. Donna and Jackie was were either dating or being fought over by the boys, and Kitty is Eric's mom.



* The women in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' are mostly GirlOfTheWeek or long term love interests for one of the boys. This is slowly expanding as the girls get more CharacterDevelopment and more opportunities to show that they have lives beyond the walls of Leonard and Sheldon's apartment. [[spoiler: All three of them find success in their own fields either on their own or through each other, and they often have scenes and plot threads to themselves. Once she starts making money as a sales rep, Penny even immediately pays back her debt to Leonard and becomes financially independent.]]
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' has many women on it: but would Captain Sisko's girlfriend, Quark's mother, or Chief O'brien's wife even be on the show if it weren't for the men they're related to? This becomes most troubling when Jadzia Dax, one of the show's main characters, eventually becomes little more than Worf's fiancee and later his wife. After that, she was only one half of a couple, and definitely the lesser half.

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* The women in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' are mostly GirlOfTheWeek or long term long-term love interests for one of the boys. This is slowly expanding as the girls get more CharacterDevelopment and more opportunities to show that they have lives beyond the walls of Leonard and Sheldon's apartment. [[spoiler: All three of them find success in their own fields either on their own or through each other, and they often have scenes and plot threads to themselves. Once she starts making money as a sales rep, Penny even immediately pays back her debt to Leonard and becomes financially independent.]]
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' has many women on it: but would Captain Sisko's girlfriend, Quark's mother, or Chief O'brien's O'Brien's wife even be on the show if it weren't for the men they're related to? This becomes most troubling when Jadzia Dax, one of the show's main characters, eventually becomes little more than Worf's fiancee and later his wife. After that, she was only one half of a couple, and definitely the lesser half.



** Also played with in that while Kasidy, Ishka and Keiko usually appear in the series as the wives/mothers/girlfriends of their men, they clearly have lives of their own and this is occasionally a side issue (Kasidy being a freighter Captain takes her away for long periods of time, Keiko goes on a long term botany study on Bajor, Ishka's "unconventional" lifestyle). None of these women stand still for their men and while they may compromise in the long run they have their own lives and keep them.
** Kira, Jadzia Dax, Kasidy and Ishka also excel in male-dominated fields with little evidence that it was any specific man who inspired them or male family member. Kira was a freedom fighter alongside men and women while her father was a farmer. Jadzia and Kasidy have no reference to important male figures and Ishka had to battle to make her status against men.
** And, of course, when you have a ''male'' relative of a main character who doesn't live on DS9, they also tend to remain minor. In fact, Quark's mom gets a ''much'' bigger role than Sisko's dad. It's not quite the same as it would be if of the command staff, all the males got there by their own merit and Jadzia and Kira were there because their dads were generals who'd arranged it or something.
** Any time Dax's former hosts became involved in a story hook, it would inevitably be one of the guys. Curzon's relationship with Sisko and the Klingons is frequently refrenced in the first two seasons--even the epidsode "Dax" is about Jadzia being put on trial for something Curzon supposedly did. Torias gets a reunion with his widow, leading to something of a SweepsWeekLesbianKiss. Joran gets two episodes [[spoiler: the second of which Flanderizes him from a musician with a violent streak into a full-on {{Expy}} of Hannibal Lecter]]. Some of Tobin's skills and history are even refrenced. We don't get to meet any of Dax's female hosts until "Facets", where its revealed [[spoiler: Curzon may have lowered the Dax Symbiot's typically high standards to let Jadzia join because he was in love with her, putting this trope into full effect.]] Somewhat mitigated in that having a cisgenderd woman casually talk about her memories as a cisgendered man contributes to the whole GenderIsNoObject attitude shown by Trill society.
* Subverted on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' with Parker. "The Inside Job" has her reveal she was adopted and mentored by a legendary (male) cat burglar, Archie, but he's introduced long after Parker's become a well-developed character and only appears in two episodes. Furthermore, she was already a StreetUrchin and pickpocket when they met, she having first become a thief at the age of 9. After she's integrated into her crew and her gotten a dose GoodFeelsGood, it's become quite clear to Archie that's she's fallen far from the thief he made her into.
* This is played so straight in {{Telenovela}}s, it hurts. Most heroines are defined exclusively for the relationship they have with the male hero, even if the soap is named after her. Some play with this trope, through; for example, in ''Simplemente María'', the titular heroine's success as a fashion designer is thanks to her own hard work.

to:

** Also played with in that while Kasidy, Ishka and Keiko usually appear in the series as the wives/mothers/girlfriends of their men, they clearly have lives of their own and this is occasionally a side issue (Kasidy being a freighter Captain captain takes her away for long periods of time, Keiko goes on a long term botany study on Bajor, Ishka's "unconventional" lifestyle). None of these women stand still for their men and while they may compromise in the long run they have their own lives and keep them.
** Kira, Jadzia Dax, Kasidy and Ishka also excel in male-dominated fields with little evidence that it was any specific man who inspired them or male family member. Kira was a freedom fighter alongside men and women while her father was a farmer. Jadzia and Kasidy have no reference to important male figures and Ishka had to battle to make attain her status against men.
** And, of course, when you have a ''male'' relative of a main character who doesn't live on DS9, they also tend to remain minor. In fact, Quark's mom gets a ''much'' bigger role than Sisko's dad. It's not quite the same as it would be if of all the men on the command staff, all the males staff got there by their own merit and Jadzia and Kira were there because their dads were generals who'd arranged it or something.
** Any time Dax's former hosts became involved in a story hook, it would inevitably be one of the guys. Curzon's relationship with Sisko and the Klingons is frequently refrenced referenced in the first two seasons--even the epidsode episode "Dax" is about Jadzia being put on trial for something Curzon supposedly did. Torias gets a reunion with his widow, leading to something of a SweepsWeekLesbianKiss. Joran gets two episodes [[spoiler: the second of which Flanderizes him from a musician with a violent streak into a full-on {{Expy}} of Hannibal Lecter]]. Some of Tobin's skills and history are even refrenced. referenced. We don't get to meet any of Dax's female hosts until "Facets", where its it's revealed [[spoiler: Curzon may have lowered the Dax Symbiot's symbiont's typically high standards to let Jadzia join because he was in love with her, putting this trope into full effect.]] Somewhat mitigated in that having a cisgenderd cisgendered woman casually talk about her memories as a cisgendered man contributes to the whole GenderIsNoObject attitude shown by Trill society.
* Subverted on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' with Parker. "The Inside Job" has her reveal she was adopted and mentored by a legendary (male) cat burglar, Archie, but he's introduced long after Parker's become a well-developed character and only appears in two episodes. Furthermore, she was already a StreetUrchin and pickpocket when they met, she having first become a thief at the age of 9. After she's integrated into her crew and her gotten a dose of GoodFeelsGood, it's become quite clear to Archie that's she's fallen far come a long way from the thief he made her into.
* This is played so straight in {{Telenovela}}s, it hurts. Most heroines are defined exclusively for by the relationship they have with the male hero, even if the soap is named after her. Some play with this trope, through; though; for example, in ''Simplemente María'', the titular heroine's success as a fashion designer is thanks to her own hard work.



** UNIT members in Season 8-10 - the Brigadier, a slightly stupid but surprisingly effective military commander with an excellent track record; Benton and Yates, both competent soldiers (one of whom gets slowly promoted due to his own competence over the course of his run); the Doctor, an ImpossibleGenius, gifted scientist and brave adventurer who has saved the world (and the Brigadier) countless times - and Jo Grant, a ditzy blonde in a miniskirt who's only on the force at all because the Brigadier agreed to pull strings for her rich uncle, and only a companion because the Doctor found her too cute to crush her feelings. Jo is actually quite an effective companion, but she will never be regarded as a high point for the show's feminism (not least because each companion on either side got their position through their own career).

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** UNIT members in Season 8-10 - the Brigadier, a slightly stupid but surprisingly effective military commander with an excellent track record; Benton and Yates, both competent soldiers (one of whom gets slowly promoted due to his own competence over the course of his run); the Doctor, an ImpossibleGenius, gifted scientist and brave adventurer who has saved the world (and the Brigadier) countless times - and Jo Grant, a ditzy blonde in a miniskirt who's only on the force at all because the Brigadier agreed to pull strings for her rich uncle, and only a companion because the Doctor found her too cute to crush her feelings. Jo is actually quite an effective companion, but she will never be regarded as a high point for the show's feminism (not least because each companion on either side the companions immediately before and after her got their position through via their own career).



* "Where did you go to my lovely" and "Last of the Breed" by Music/{{Peter Sarstedt}}is this story but Marie-Claire is a woman.

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* "Where did you go to my lovely" Do You Go To (My Lovely)" and "Last of the Breed" by Music/{{Peter Sarstedt}}is Sarstedt}} tell this story but Marie-Claire is a woman.



** It's also arguble if Yunalesca even fully counts as trope. Yes, her fame and influece are partly connected to her being the daughter of Yu Yevon, but it also was she who created the method of defeating Sin(creating the Final Aeon), as well as being the first to defeat Sin, as well as had a significant role [[PathOfInspiration in creating and spreading of the Yevonite beliefs]]. Argubly, she was as much important in the forming of Yevonite religion as her father, if not even more so, seeing Yu Yevon [[spoiler: was basically rendered into a mindless entity behind Sin, his "mind" being now closer to computer program, rather than having a reall conciousness for over a milennia.]]

to:

** It's also arguble if Yunalesca even fully counts as trope. Yes, her fame and influece are partly connected to her being the daughter of Yu Yevon, but it also was she who created the method of defeating Sin(creating the Final Aeon), as well as being the first to defeat Sin, as well as had a significant role [[PathOfInspiration in creating and spreading of the Yevonite beliefs]]. Argubly, she was as much important in the forming of Yevonite religion as her father, if not even more so, seeing Yu Yevon [[spoiler: was basically rendered into a mindless entity behind Sin, his "mind" being now closer to computer program, rather than having a reall conciousness for over a milennia.millennium.]]
25th Aug '17 2:50:10 AM Hjortron18
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* In ''Film/{{Thor}}'', Jane Foster is the daughter of an astrophysicist, mentored by her late father's colleague. She only has access to any knowledge of Asgard or Asgardian technology by way of her romantic relationship with Thor, and it's not-so-subtly implied that her primary interest in continuing her research is to reconnect with him. Of course, it's [[ChrisHemsworth Thor]], so that last part is understandable.

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* In ''Film/{{Thor}}'', Jane Foster is the daughter of an astrophysicist, mentored by her late father's colleague. She only has access to any knowledge of Asgard or Asgardian technology by way of her romantic relationship with Thor, and it's not-so-subtly implied that her primary interest in continuing her research is to reconnect with him. Of course, it's [[ChrisHemsworth [[Creator/ChrisHemsworth Thor]], so that last part is understandable.
2nd Aug '17 12:12:25 PM gb00393
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Cersei Lannister feels like she is suffering under this in the male dominated Westerosi society, but Tywin bluntly tells her the real reason for her lack of power and influence beyond her family name is that she isn't as capable as she thinks she is; it can also be surmised that at least some of her apparent jealousy at Brienne of Tarth is how Brienne ''is'' by all appearances a relatively self-made woman whose family name isn't nearly as important to who Brienne became and what she achieved.
11th Jun '17 7:00:49 PM Katsuhagi
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* Defied in Bayonetta. [[Spoiler: The title character bears [[TheSacredDarkness the Left Eye of the World,]] a power that represents th]]e true power of darkness and boosts her own magic several fold. Her father, Balder, bears the Right Eye of the World, which is a light-aligned counterpart to the left. Balder's whole plan in the first game was to ensure Bayonetta reached her full power, and he killed all the other witch candidates save for one that he enslaved. All of this suggests that Bayonetta is only so powerful because her father made her so...until later cutscenes revealed that she received training from Jeanne, against the Umbran Elder's wishes. The sequel builds on this: Not only was Bayonetta allowed to spar with Jeanne, but we find that Bayonetta's mother was an extraordinarily powerful witch in her own right. Bayonetta inherited her power from ''both'' her parents, and it shows.]]

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* Defied in Bayonetta. [[Spoiler: The title character bears [[TheSacredDarkness the Left Eye of the World,]] a power that represents th]]e the true power of darkness and boosts her own magic several fold. Her father, Balder, bears the Right Eye of the World, which is a light-aligned counterpart to the left. Balder's whole plan in the first game was to ensure Bayonetta reached her full power, and he killed all the other witch candidates save for one that he enslaved. All of this suggests that Bayonetta is only so powerful because her father made her so... until later cutscenes revealed that she received training from Jeanne, against the Umbran Elder's wishes. The sequel builds on this: Not only was Bayonetta allowed to spar with Jeanne, but we find that Bayonetta's mother was an extraordinarily powerful witch in her own right. Bayonetta inherited her power from ''both'' her parents, and it shows.]]
11th May '17 3:20:50 PM NOYB
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* Series/HartToHart has Jonathan Hart, who is a self-made millionaire, jetting around the world running his company, and Jennifer Hart, who tags along, has a seat on the Board she clearly wouldn't have if she weren't married to him, and whose father is clearly old money and lots of it, who gave his little girl whatever she wished. Occasionally they'll mention that Jennifer [[InformedAbility used to be a reporter]] but most of the time she's seen only as the wife of the great Jonathan Hart.

to:

* Series/HartToHart ''Series/HartToHart'' has Jonathan Hart, who is a self-made millionaire, jetting around the world running his company, and Jennifer Hart, who tags along, has a seat on the Board she clearly wouldn't have if she weren't married to him, and whose father is clearly old money and lots of it, who gave his little girl whatever she wished. Occasionally they'll mention that Jennifer [[InformedAbility used to be a reporter]] but most of the time she's seen only as the wife of the great Jonathan Hart.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NeverASelfMadeWoman