History Main / MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena

13th Apr '17 5:12:48 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/SinsOfADarkAge'' (An upcoming game made by [[SinsofASolarEmpire Ironclad Games]] that mixes things up by introducing randomly selected quests during the match, each of which comes with a unique reward in addition to building an overall quest completion reward list. Up to 5 quests can occur per match, with a current pool of 10 to select from.

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* ''VideoGame/SinsOfADarkAge'' (An upcoming game made by [[SinsofASolarEmpire [[VideoGame/SinsofASolarEmpire Ironclad Games]] that mixes things up by introducing randomly selected quests during the match, each of which comes with a unique reward in addition to building an overall quest completion reward list. Up to 5 quests can occur per match, with a current pool of 10 to select from.
23rd Mar '17 3:59:51 PM Vir
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To mitigate the problem of having highly competitive people of variable skill levels, some of the newer [=MOBAs=] have tried to adopt different systems with varying levels of success, either by making it easier for the losing team to catch up or by making it so that matches end more quickly when one team gains a large advantage; both solutions are intended to give players less time to be unhappy with each other and to spend less time playing games where the outcome is already clear. In addition, most if not all the current [=MOBAs=] have some sort of player score-based matchmaking system, where all players have a personal score -- usually known as "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo_rating_system Elo]]" from the old days of ''LeagueOfLegends'' or "matchmaking ranking" (MMR) from present day ''[[VideoGame/{{Dota2}} DOTA 2]]'' -- and joining the matchmaking queue will theoretically match you only with players with a score similar to yours, in order to guarantee that teams have a roughly even chance of winning.

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To mitigate the problem of having highly competitive people of variable skill levels, some of the newer [=MOBAs=] have tried to adopt different systems with varying levels of success, either by making it easier for the losing team to catch up or by making it so that matches end more quickly when one team gains a large advantage; both solutions are intended to give players less time to be unhappy with each other and to spend less time playing games where the outcome is already clear. In addition, most if not all the current [=MOBAs=] have some sort of player score-based matchmaking system, where all players have a personal score -- usually known as "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo_rating_system Elo]]" from the old days of ''LeagueOfLegends'' ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'' or "matchmaking ranking" (MMR) from present day ''[[VideoGame/{{Dota2}} DOTA 2]]'' ''VideoGame/Dota2'' -- and joining the matchmaking queue will theoretically match you only with players with a score similar to yours, in order to guarantee that teams have a roughly even chance of winning.
23rd Mar '17 1:22:19 PM slvstrChung
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* The support, a character whose job is to grant some sort of buff or healing ability to the rest of their team, keeping important characters (such as the caster and the carry) alive, helping characters stay "in-lane" longer despite taking damage, and otherwise boosting the abilities of their team. In five-player games, these players tend to be the one forced to double-up in a lane with one of their teammates and allow their teammate to accumulate the bulk of the money, forcing them to find other ways to be useful which don't involve them having high durability or damage. Dedicated support players are often called upon to master the largest variety of characters, as the "support" role can also involve offensive operations such as running interference for the damage-dealers or even setting up opportunities for them.
* The jungler, a character whose job it is to wander around in the jungle killing neutral creeps. Unlike other heroes, these characters may fill any of the other roles on their team (though usually not support), and also are usually expected to act as assassins, trying to gang-kill ("gank") enemy heroes - not only the enemy jungler, but also the enemies in lanes. They also are usually expected to stand in for allied heroes when they're killed or forced to retreat from a lane in order to keep the lane covered at all times. In many games, the jungler is also expected to act as reconnaissance, either directly keeping an eye out for the enemy jungler to ensure that they don't ambush their allies, or leaving "wards" around, which are sentry type units which may or may not be possible for the enemy to attack but which grant sight to allies, giving them warning if an enemy is trying to sneak up on them.

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* The support, Support, a character whose job is to grant some sort of buff or healing ability to the rest of their team, keeping important characters (such as the caster and the carry) alive, helping characters stay "in-lane" longer despite taking damage, and otherwise boosting the abilities of their team. In five-player games, these players tend to be the one forced to double-up in a lane with one of their teammates and allow their teammate to accumulate the bulk of the money, forcing them to find other ways to be useful which don't involve them having high durability or damage. Dedicated support players are often called upon to master the largest variety of characters, as the "support" role can also involve offensive operations such as running interference for the damage-dealers or even setting up opportunities for them.
* The jungler, Jungler, a character whose job it is to wander around in the jungle killing neutral creeps. Unlike other heroes, these characters may fill any of the other roles on their team (though usually not support), and also are usually expected to act as assassins, trying to gang-kill ("gank") enemy heroes - not only the enemy jungler, but also the enemies in lanes. They also are usually expected to stand in for allied heroes when they're killed or forced to retreat from a lane in order to keep the lane covered at all times. In many games, the jungler is also expected to act as reconnaissance, either directly keeping an eye out for the enemy jungler to ensure that they don't ambush their allies, or leaving "wards" around, which are sentry type sentry-type units which may or may not be possible for the enemy to attack but which grant sight to allies, giving them warning if an enemy is trying to sneak up on them.
8th Mar '17 2:19:00 PM slvstrChung
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Hero units in the game grow inherently more powerful over time. Towers are either exempted from this or grow at a slower rate, meaning that the towers will [[DeathOfAThousandCuts inevitably be brought down by damage from both the minions and heroes]]. Player heroes gain power by killing enemy minions, neutral creeps, towers and enemy heroes. In many games, [[LeakedExperience merely being around a killed enemy unit gives a hero]] ExperiencePoints and/or money but directly killing a creep will either give them a resource they don't gain passively (usually a StatusBuff) or more of that resource - usually money. This mechanic makes up the core of the gameplay. The opposing heroes want to do the same thing, trying to kill the allied units in order to accumulate experience and money[[note]]some games allow [[BadBoss killing of your own minions]] to deny the enemy their rewards[[/note]]. Due to the lanes, allied minions will always go directly into contact with enemy minions and there are only a limited number of neutral monsters in the jungle to kill, forcing players to inevitably come into conflict with each other.

This conflict is accentuated by three additional factors. First, heroes are extremely valuable to kill, granting large amounts of money and experience. In many games[[note]]but increasingly being dropped due to the popularity of VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends[[/note]], this is doubly harmful as the hero who is killed outright loses money. Secondly, if an enemy hero is killed or forced to retreat, there is no opposition to killing enemy minions, racking up high amounts of money and experience. This also denies the enemy hero the opportunity to do the same, damaging their ability to accumulate power and resources. Thirdly, if a lane is left undefended, it is easier to "push" the lane (leading allied minions in an attack on an enemy tower)[[note]]this is very important because towers usually preferentially target minions, allowing the hero to damage the tower in relative anonymity[[/note]].

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Hero units in the game grow inherently more powerful over time. Towers are either exempted from this or grow at a slower rate, meaning that the towers will [[DeathOfAThousandCuts inevitably be brought down by damage from both the minions and heroes]]. Player heroes gain power by killing enemy minions, neutral creeps, towers and enemy heroes. In many games, [[LeakedExperience merely being around a killed enemy unit unit]] gives a hero]] hero ExperiencePoints and/or money money, but directly killing a creep will either give them a resource they don't gain passively (usually a StatusBuff) or more of that resource - usually money. This mechanic makes up the core of the gameplay. The opposing heroes want to do the same thing, trying to kill the allied units in order to accumulate experience and money[[note]]some games allow [[BadBoss killing of your own minions]] to deny the enemy their rewards[[/note]]. Due to the lanes, allied minions will always go directly into contact with enemy minions and there are only a limited number of neutral monsters in the jungle to kill, forcing players to inevitably come into conflict with each other.

This conflict is accentuated by three additional factors. First, heroes are extremely valuable to kill, granting large amounts of money and experience. In many games[[note]]but increasingly being dropped due to the popularity of VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends[[/note]], this is doubly harmful as the hero who is killed outright loses money. Secondly, if an enemy hero is killed or forced to retreat, there is no opposition to killing while you kill enemy minions, racking up high amounts of money and experience. This also denies the enemy hero the opportunity to do the same, damaging their ability to accumulate power and resources. Thirdly, if a lane is left undefended, it is easier to "push" the lane (leading allied minions in an attack on an enemy tower)[[note]]this is very important because towers usually preferentially target minions, allowing the hero to damage besiege the tower in relative anonymity[[/note]].



* The Carry: A character, typically a GlassCannon, who deals out an immense amount of damage in a short period of time. They are named after their responsibility for "carrying" their team to victory in the late game after their early-game frailty has been mitigated. By the end-game, these characters may be capable of killing multiple enemy heroes in a single fight or bringing down a tower quickly. Some carries are also considered "assassins", who are focused on covertly (and quickly) killing off specific vital enemy targets that are considered a threat.
* The Caster: Frequently acts as a secondary carry of sorts. Tend to be reliant on their abilities to do damage, but they can place [[StandardStatusEffects debilitating penalties upon enemy heroes]] or [[HerdHittingAttack control the battlefield]] in such a way to make it harder for the enemy to bring their power to bear. Like the carry, these characters tend to start out weak but end the game with a great deal of power. Unlike carries, they may be poor at destroying towers due to their main damage coming from their abilities, which (in some games) towers are immune to. They can also be foils to the DPS-type heroes, who rely more on basic-attack damage output as opposed to a timely yet rewarding ability burst.
* The tank, a character whose purpose is to draw enemy aggression. They're typically good at forcing enemies to fight with them, either stunning, immobilizing, trapping, pulling in, or taunting enemies into attacking them, allowing their teammates to kill them while simultaneously being able to take a lot of punishment.
* The support, a character whose job is to grant some sort of buff or healing ability to the rest of their team, keeping important characters (such as the caster and the carry) alive, helping characters stay "in-lane" longer while taking damage, and otherwise boosting the abilities of their team. In five-player games, these players tend to be the one forced to double-up in a lane with one of their teammates and allow their teammate to accumulate the bulk of the money, forcing them to find other ways to be useful which don't involve them having high durability or damage. Dedicated support players are often called upon to master the largest variety of characters, as the "support" role can also involve offensive operations such as running interference for the damage-dealers or even setting up opportunities for them.

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* The Carry: A character, typically a GlassCannon, who deals out an immense amount outputs a lot of damage in a short period of time.through basic attacks. They are named after their responsibility for "carrying" their team to victory in the late game after their early-game frailty has been mitigated. By the end-game, these characters may be capable of killing multiple enemy heroes in a single fight or bringing down a tower quickly. Carries typically rely on the MagikarpPower trope for balancing, allowing you to throw them off their game in the opening minutes of the match. Some carries are also considered "assassins", who are focused on covertly (and quickly) killing off specific vital enemy targets that are considered a threat.
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* The Caster: Frequently acts as a secondary carry of sorts. Tend Where the Carry puts out DeathOfAThousandCuts, Casters tend to be reliant on their abilities to do bursts of damage, but they can also place [[StandardStatusEffects debilitating penalties upon enemy heroes]] or [[HerdHittingAttack control the battlefield]] in such a way to make it harder for the enemy to bring their power to bear. Like the carry, these characters tend to start out weak but end the game with a great deal of power. Unlike carries, they may be poor at destroying towers due to their main damage coming from their abilities, which (in some games) towers are immune to. They can also be foils to the DPS-type heroes, who rely more on basic-attack damage output as opposed to a timely yet rewarding ability burst.
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* The tank, Tank, a character whose purpose is to draw enemy aggression. They're typically good at forcing enemies to fight with them, either stunning, immobilizing, trapping, pulling in, or taunting enemies into attacking them, allowing them. This allows their teammates to kill them while simultaneously being they are otherwise occupied. Simultaneously, the Tank needs to be able to take a lot of punishment.
* The support, a character whose job is to grant some sort of buff or healing ability to the rest of their team, keeping important characters (such as the caster and the carry) alive, helping characters stay "in-lane" longer while despite taking damage, and otherwise boosting the abilities of their team. In five-player games, these players tend to be the one forced to double-up in a lane with one of their teammates and allow their teammate to accumulate the bulk of the money, forcing them to find other ways to be useful which don't involve them having high durability or damage. Dedicated support players are often called upon to master the largest variety of characters, as the "support" role can also involve offensive operations such as running interference for the damage-dealers or even setting up opportunities for them.



While enemy heroes may have their own HitPoints, the health of your team as a whole is measured in its buildings. The core building, remember, is the InstantWinCondition, and destroying it by any means, at any time, results in victory. Additionally, as you lose your outer towers, you lose map control; the FogOfWar spreads, giving the enemy team more opportunities to ambush you. Finally, within your base are typically important buildings which, if destroyed, actually unlock ''extra {{mook}}s for the other team'', giving them additional advantages and tilting the game further in their favor.

UnstableEquilibrium is a big factor in [=MOBAs=]. Early-game mistakes can result in one team or another gaining an early advantage, which makes it easier for them to win later confrontations, giving them a larger advantage with every victory. As a result, games can often be decided long before either base is in even remote danger of destruction. Even worse, because hero characters are (deliberately) limited in what they can bring to the table, a lack of teamwork can spell disaster. You might play a perfect game, execute everything correctly, avoid needless damage, get a ton of kills… and still lose, because someone on your team dropped their responsibilities. Even worse, if your team doesn’t plan to do what you want them to, you might not be able to play your game ''at all''; you may be forced to use your character to do things s/he isn’t good at or even ''is designed to be bad at'', leaving a sour taste in one’s mouth—even if said non-cooperative teammates go on to win the game (''especially'' if). The end result is that people can get ''really'' angry when playing a MOBA.

As you can imagine, MOBA players are infamously [[SuffersNewbiesPoorly hostile towards newbies]] and [[IneffectualLoner weak team players]]. Many of these games have devoted communities to which the game in question is very much SeriousBusiness, and due to the inherent difficulties in measuring the contribution of individual players on teams, matchmaking between individual players for pick-up games tends to lead to much more varied skill levels of players on a given team than for games with more individually tailored rating systems, especially in games with five or more players on a side. All of this is a recipe for {{GIFT}} and {{Griefing}}, and all of the DOTA clones, due to the relatively long matches and similar game design, suffer from this to a great extent.

To mitigate the problem of having highly competitive people of variable skill levels, some of the newer [=MOBAs=] have tried to adopt different systems with varying levels of success, either by making it easier for the losing team to catch up or by making it so that matches end more quickly when one team gains a large advantage; both solutions are intended to give players less time to be unhappy with each other and to spend less time playing games where the outcome is already clear. In addition, most if not all the current [=MOBAs=] have some sort of player score-based matchmaking system, where all players have a personal score -- usually known as "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo_rating_system Elo]]" from the old days of ''LeagueOfLegends'' or "matchmaking ranking" (MMR) from present day ''[[VideoGame/{{Dota2}} DOTA 2]]'' -- and joining the matchmaking queue will in principle match you only with players with a score similar to yours, in order to guarantee to some degree that both teams will have players of more or less the same skill level.

to:

While enemy heroes may have their own HitPoints, the health of your team as a whole is measured in its buildings. The core building, remember, is the InstantWinCondition, and destroying it by any means, at any time, results in victory. Additionally, as you lose your outer towers, you lose map control; the FogOfWar spreads, giving the enemy team more opportunities to ambush you. Finally, within your base are typically important buildings which, if destroyed, actually unlock ''extra {{mook}}s for the other enemy team'', giving them additional advantages and tilting the game further in their favor.

UnstableEquilibrium is a big factor in [=MOBAs=]. Early-game mistakes can result in one team or another gaining an early advantage, which makes it easier for them to win later confrontations, giving them a larger advantage with every victory. As a result, games can often be decided long before either base is in even remote danger of destruction. Even worse, Numbers are also critically important; at competitive levels of play, teams will often disengage after losing only ''one'' of their members, because their absence is already enough to virtually guarantee victory to the enemy team. NeverSplitTheParty in a MOBA. Finally, because hero characters are (deliberately) limited in what they can bring to the table, a lack of teamwork can spell disaster. You might play a perfect game, execute everything correctly, avoid needless damage, get a ton of kills… kills... and still lose, because someone on your team dropped their responsibilities. Even worse, if your team doesn’t plan to do what you want them to, you might not be able to play your game ''at all''; you may be forced to use your character to do things s/he isn’t good at or even ''is designed to be bad at'', leaving a sour taste in one’s mouth—even if said non-cooperative teammates go on to win the game (''especially'' if). The end result is that people can get ''really'' angry when playing a MOBA.

As you can imagine, MOBA players communities are infamously infamous: they [[SuffersNewbiesPoorly hostile towards newbies]] Suffer Newbies Poorly]] and blast [[IneffectualLoner weak team players]]. Many of these games have devoted communities to which the game in question is very much SeriousBusiness, and due to the inherent difficulties in measuring the contribution of individual players on teams, matchmaking between individual players for pick-up games tends to lead to much more varied skill levels of players on a given team than for games with more individually tailored individually-tailored rating systems, especially in games with five or more players on a side. All This, plus the basics of this is human psychology, results in a recipe for {{GIFT}} and {{Griefing}}, and all of the DOTA clones, due to the relatively long matches and similar game design, suffer from this to a great extent.

To mitigate the problem of having highly competitive people of variable skill levels, some of the newer [=MOBAs=] have tried to adopt different systems with varying levels of success, either by making it easier for the losing team to catch up or by making it so that matches end more quickly when one team gains a large advantage; both solutions are intended to give players less time to be unhappy with each other and to spend less time playing games where the outcome is already clear. In addition, most if not all the current [=MOBAs=] have some sort of player score-based matchmaking system, where all players have a personal score -- usually known as "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo_rating_system Elo]]" from the old days of ''LeagueOfLegends'' or "matchmaking ranking" (MMR) from present day ''[[VideoGame/{{Dota2}} DOTA 2]]'' -- and joining the matchmaking queue will in principle theoretically match you only with players with a score similar to yours, in order to guarantee to some degree that both teams will have players a roughly even chance of more or less the same skill level.winning.


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* NeverMyFault: a lot of MOBA players exhibit this attitude.
7th Feb '17 7:36:24 AM Hanz
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* ''VideoGame/OrcsMustDieUnchained'', an evolution of a Third Person Shooter and Tower Defense hybrid series into a competitive multiplayer direction.


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* ''VideoGame/OrcsMustDieUnchained'' originally had a Siege mode that mixed MOBA-style action with the TowerDefense gameplay of the previous games, but was eventually removed due to unpopularity to focus more on the [=PvE=] aspect of the game.
11th Dec '16 7:58:49 PM ChrisX
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* TotalPartyKill: "ACED!"

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* TotalPartyKill: "ACED!"Depends on the game. There are [[VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends "Aced!"]], [[VideoGame/{{Smite}} "Deicide!"]] or [[VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm "Enemy Team Dominated!"]], or [[VideoGame/{{Dota 2}} just stays quiet]] [[AvertedTrope and not announcing the trope.]]
11th Dec '16 7:06:00 PM ChrisX
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* MonkeyKingLite: Due to the genre's popularity in China, it feels like there is a creed "There must always be a Monkey King in a MOBA", if it's not a flat out playable character based on Sun Wukong (or Wukong himself being part of the roster), it's a skin based on him being in the roster.
4th Dec '16 1:31:14 PM Morgenthaler
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'''Erik:''' Nope, but [[TakeThatUs Blizzard sure did!]]

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'''Erik:''' Nope, but [[TakeThatUs Blizzard sure did!]]did!
4th Dec '16 1:30:59 PM Morgenthaler
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* InsultBackfire: Calling someone "fat" usually was meant literally and an insult, especially to ladies. In this genre? Calling someone "fat" is more along the line about acknowledging how dangerous that someone has become (through a good amount of farming or getting fed with enemy hero kills) and probably would carry their team to victory. So, "fat" here sounds more like being acknowledged as a {{Badass}}. The worst interpretation is that you just put a 'kick me' sign in your butt and one time you die, you give a good amount of reward for your enemies that may become just their key to make a comeback.

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* InsultBackfire: Calling someone "fat" usually was meant literally and an insult, especially to ladies. In this genre? Calling someone "fat" is more along the line about acknowledging how dangerous that someone has become (through a good amount of farming or getting fed with enemy hero kills) and probably would carry their team to victory. So, "fat" here sounds more like being acknowledged as a {{Badass}}.badass. The worst interpretation is that you just put a 'kick me' sign in your butt and one time you die, you give a good amount of reward for your enemies that may become just their key to make a comeback.
1st Dec '16 1:49:28 AM judasmartel
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** Or Pinoys and Chinese (From china) for South East Asian players.
** Also, extend the hate towards Russians to any even remotely slavic nationality. If you speak a slavic language in a game, you will be called a Russian and hated for it, unless you manage to play competently.

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** Or Pinoys Filipinos and Mainland Chinese (From china) for South East Asian players.
** Also, extend the hate towards Russians to any even remotely slavic Slavic nationality. If you speak a slavic Slavic language in a game, you will be called a Russian and hated for it, unless you manage to play competently.
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