History Main / MostWritersAreHuman

25th May '18 11:06:25 PM SilverBrick
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Glaringly obvious in ''VideoGame/{{Starbound}}'' - each alien species has a culture based around a (usually stereotypical) human culture. [[PlantAliens Florans]] are [[OneMillionBC cavemen]], [[FishPeople Hylotl]] are Japanese, and Novakids are [[SpaceWestern Space Westerners]].
23rd Apr '18 11:54:29 AM MasterFuzzy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Nearly every novel in the ''Literature/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' puts humans - and humans from the movies, at that - in all of the important positions. The same two human women (Leia Organa Solo and Mon Mothma) switch back and forth as President of the New Republic. Humans are the important Jedi, the major heroes, the minor characters, and quite often the major villains. Nonhumans are relatively rarely in prominent positive roles; they're typically the minor villains, the {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, in supporting roles at best, though sometimes they do manage to be ScaryDogmaticAliens. Some books try to justify this by saying that when the New Republic was the Rebel Alliance it was humans who founded it and those who survived stayed in power, and that humans are probably the most populous species out there.
** The major exception is Creator/TimothyZahn's books. Nonhumans are in a great many of the human roles, and it's not really remarked on. In the ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'' duology, the President of the New Republic is a male Calibop, for example. Minor villains tend to be humans and aliens both. Aliens in prominent roles often do explicitly think differently than humans do, and design different settings. When any specific group is homogeneous or nearly so, Zahn gives a ''reason''. Imperial doctrine favors humans. Chiss are isolationist. So on.
** Exceptions like Admiral Ackbar and Borsk Fey'lya tend to be either from the movies or made by Zahn. Zahn actually gave a sort of vague nod to this trope by making an Imperial human head out away from Imperial Center, and think in disgust about how other humans are so few outside of, well, human-controlled territory.

to:

* Nearly At first, nearly every novel in the ''Literature/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' puts humans - and humans from the movies, at that - in all of the important positions. The same two human women (Leia Organa Solo and Mon Mothma) switch back and forth as President of the New Republic. Humans are the important Jedi, the major heroes, the minor characters, and quite often the major villains. Nonhumans are relatively rarely in prominent positive roles; they're typically the minor villains, the {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, in supporting roles at best, though sometimes they do manage to be ScaryDogmaticAliens. Some books try to justify this by saying that when the New Republic was the Rebel Alliance it was humans who founded it and those who survived stayed in power, and that humans are probably the most populous species out there.
** The
there. However, this becomes downplayed as the EU develops, with later books including multiple major exception is Creator/TimothyZahn's books. Nonhumans are in a great many of the human roles, and it's not really remarked on. In the ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'' duology, the President of the New Republic is a male Calibop, for example. Minor villains tend to be humans and aliens both. Aliens in prominent roles non-human characters, who often do explicitly think and act differently than humans do, and design different settings. When any specific group is homogeneous or nearly so, Zahn gives a ''reason''. Imperial doctrine favors humans. Chiss are isolationist. So on.
** Exceptions like Admiral Ackbar and Borsk Fey'lya tend to be either from the movies or made by Zahn. Zahn actually gave a sort of vague nod to this trope by making an Imperial human head out away from Imperial Center, and think in disgust about how other humans are so few outside of, well, human-controlled territory.
do.



* Creator/JRRTolkien invoked this in one of his letters regarding Middle-Earth. The gist was that such fantastic stories should be centred on humans, since when you get down to it, a ''human'' writer won't be able to portray an elf as anything but a man in a funny suit. And yet, ''Literature/TheHobbit'' has no human main characters (unless you count the hobbit himself[[note]]Hobbits are really only a midget sub-species of humans that evolved a culture of their own -- from the Elves' point of view, they're no different from the other Mortals[[/note]] -- Gandalf isn't a human at all), instead featuring dwarves; and ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' only has two major human characters out of nine, one of which dies (again, unless you count hobbits). Though Aragorn plays some important roles early on, and Boromir has the memorable death scene in book two, the first large-scale plot involving regular humans is Rohan. In Book Three.\\\
The hobbits definitely count. They're basically small humans, psychologically as well as biologically. Elves, dwarves, ents, orcs, and so on are almost never focus characters in either ''Literature/TheHobbit'' or ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''. The elves do get quite a run in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', which is much more mythic and less familiar and homey; their relatability is probably highest when they're dealing with adversity ([[WriteWhatYouKnow war]], [[YouCantGoHomeAgain exile]], [[RememberTheAlamo futile attempts at revenge]], and so on)...

to:

* Creator/JRRTolkien invoked this in one of his letters regarding Middle-Earth. The gist was that such fantastic stories should be centred on humans, since when you get down to it, a ''human'' writer won't be able to portray an elf as anything but a man in a funny suit. And yet, ''Literature/TheHobbit'' has no human main characters (unless you count the hobbit himself[[note]]Hobbits are really only a midget sub-species of humans that evolved a culture of their own -- from the Elves' point of view, they're no different from the other Mortals[[/note]] -- Gandalf isn't a human at all), instead featuring dwarves; Dwarves; and ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' only has two major human characters out of nine, one of which dies (again, unless you count hobbits). Hobbits). Though Aragorn plays some important roles early on, and Boromir has the memorable death scene in book two, the first large-scale plot involving regular humans is the one with Rohan. In Book Three.\\\
Three.
**
The hobbits Hobbits definitely count. They're basically small humans, psychologically as well as biologically. Elves, dwarves, ents, orcs, Dwarves, Ents, Orcs, and so on are almost never focus characters in either ''Literature/TheHobbit'' or ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''. The elves Elves do get quite a run in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', which is much more mythic and less familiar and homey; their relatability is probably highest when they're dealing with adversity ([[WriteWhatYouKnow war]], [[YouCantGoHomeAgain exile]], [[RememberTheAlamo futile attempts at revenge]], and so on)...on).



* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' novels, in which a nonhumanoid crew member takes bets on whether the ship's motto will be a human proverb despite the extreme diversity of the ship's crew, and loses when the Vulcan saying "Infinite diversity in infinite combinations" is chosen. He asks whether Vulcans count as human, as they're far more humanlike than a cybernetically-enhanced featherless ostrich with a prehensile tail..

to:

* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' novels, in which a nonhumanoid crew member takes bets on whether the ship's motto will be a human proverb despite the extreme diversity of the ship's crew, and loses when the Vulcan saying "Infinite diversity in infinite combinations" is chosen. He asks whether Vulcans count as human, as they're far more humanlike than a cybernetically-enhanced featherless ostrich with a prehensile tail..tail.



* Creator/RussellTDavies is a well-known practitioner of this trope in his ''Series/DoctorWho'' work. He has opined more than once that people don't want to see "Zog Monsters" on the "planet Zog" and only gradually introduced alien planets into the series. In the first three whole seasons of his ''Doctor Who'', more than half of the episodes happened on Earth. The others visited human-made satellites, other human-settled worlds, and even human colonies in deep space... but only one locations visited in those 41 episodes was not dominated by humans (and even then, the most important guest star was, wait for it, a human - although barely recognizable as such)
** The ''entire'' first season never left Earth (or a satellite around it) until early in season two, Rose said "you promised me a planet, remember?" So we go to... "New New York" on New Earth, and from then on, Earth colonies on non-Earth planets were fair game. ''Utopia,'' part one of the three-part season three finale, was the first time they went to another planet that wasn't an Earth colony. The new series has generally focused on time travel over space travel in general, even in non-Davies stories -- and even after Davies left.
** The bit people tend to overlook is that the ''old'' show took the same attitude -- for most of its run, 90% or more of its stories feature Earth, Earth colonies, Earth astronauts in space, et cetera et cetera. The only exception? The late seventies and early eighties -- right after this little thing called "Star Wars" happens...
*** It was more justified due to the smaller budget. In a case of RealLifeWritesThePlot for most of the Third Doctor's era he was trapped on Earth.

to:

* Creator/RussellTDavies is a well-known practitioner of this trope in his ''Series/DoctorWho'' work. He has opined more than once that people don't want to see "Zog Monsters" on the "planet Zog" and only gradually introduced alien planets into the series. In the first three whole seasons of his ''Doctor Who'', more than half of the episodes happened on Earth. The others visited human-made satellites, other human-settled worlds, and even human colonies in deep space... but only one locations location visited in those 41 episodes was not dominated by humans (and even then, the most important guest star was, wait for it, a human - although barely recognizable as such)
such).
** The ''entire'' first season never left Earth (or a satellite around it) until early in season two, Rose said "you promised me a planet, remember?" So we go to... "New New York" on New Earth, and from then on, Earth colonies on non-Earth planets were fair game. it). ''Utopia,'' part one of the three-part season three finale, was the first time they went to another planet that wasn't an Earth colony. The new series has generally focused on time travel over space travel in general, even in non-Davies colony.
** Overall, the vast majority of the show's
stories -- and even after Davies left.
** The bit people tend to overlook is that the ''old'' show took the same attitude -- for most of its run, 90% or more of its stories feature
have featured Earth, Earth colonies, Earth astronauts in space, et cetera et cetera. astronauts, etc. The only exception? The late seventies and early eighties -- right after this little thing called "Star Wars" happens...
happened...
*** It was more actually justified due to the smaller budget. In a case of RealLifeWritesThePlot for most of the Third Doctor's era era, wherein he was trapped on Earth.



*** Quite a few of the oldest stories have no humans save the main cast, the second story "The Daleks", "The Space Museum", "The Dominators"... Though the characters still mostly look human.

to:

*** Quite a few of the oldest stories have no humans save the main cast, such as the second story "The Daleks", "The Space Museum", "The Dominators"... Though the characters still mostly look human.



** It isn't helped that the main Muppet cast, including Big Bird, Elmo, Grover, Prairie Dawn, Abby, and Cookie Monster are explicitly children. To compare, the adult Muppets: Oscar, Bert, Ernie, and the host of minor Muppets over the years, tend to be the ones giving advice instead of taking it.

to:

** It isn't helped that the main Muppet cast, including Big Bird, Elmo, Grover, Prairie Dawn, Abby, and Cookie Monster are explicitly children. To compare, the adult Muppets: Oscar, Bert, Ernie, and the host of minor Muppets over the years, tend to be the ones giving advice instead of taking it.
19th Jan '18 6:57:51 AM Cryoclaste
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Wait, shows with ''E. coli'' as the main characters? There's always ''WesternAnimation/OsmosisJones'', where the cast is made up of red blood cells and fat cells and cold medicine and viruses and.... oh, no, wait, they turned all of the characters into humanoids. Of course, since the show is a FantasticVoyagePlot, most of the characters aren't just human, they're A human. When a dog cell get into Hector's body, it has a canine form and habits. Presumably if Ozzy and Drix had visited the dog's body, it would've been set up like a gargantuan kennel.

to:

* Wait, shows with ''E. coli'' as the main characters? There's always ''WesternAnimation/OsmosisJones'', ''Film/OsmosisJones'', where the cast is made up of red blood cells and fat cells and cold medicine and viruses and.... oh, no, wait, they turned all of the characters into humanoids. Of course, since the show is a FantasticVoyagePlot, most of the characters aren't just human, they're A human. When a dog cell get into Hector's body, it has a canine form and habits. Presumably if Ozzy and Drix had visited the dog's body, it would've been set up like a gargantuan kennel.
25th Dec '17 9:09:30 PM StarSword
Is there an issue? Send a Message


See also AliensSpeakingEnglish, BishonenLine, CreatorProvincialism, EarthIsTheCenterOfTheUniverse, HumanAliens, HumanoidAbomination, HumanoidAnimals, MonstrousHumanoid, and WhatMeasureIsANonHuman. Also see HumansAreIndexed.

to:

See also AliensSpeakingEnglish, BishonenLine, CreatorProvincialism, EarthIsTheCenterOfTheUniverse, HumanAliens, HumanoidAbomination, HumanoidAnimals, MonstrousHumanoid, and WhatMeasureIsANonHuman. Also see HumansAreIndexed.
See also HumansAreWhite, when the majority of important human characters in the setting appear to be Caucasian.



* {{Deconstructed}} in ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters''. The overabundance of humans from Earth in canon Starfleet is attributed to a ''cultural'' dominance of Earthlings in the Federation writ large. This leads to resentment towards Earthlings by many groups in the Federation. It also leads to such things as Sandra Pickens, a colonial-born Starfleet captain with a ''very'' thick ([[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian-based]]) accent, being repeatedly [[PassedOverPromotion passed over for promotion]] when her very real skills as a starship commander would normally warrant it.

to:

* {{Deconstructed}} in ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters''. The overabundance of humans from Earth in canon Starfleet is attributed to a ''cultural'' dominance of Earthlings in the Federation writ large. This leads to resentment towards Earthlings by many groups in the Federation. Federation that rears its head during the Federation-Klingon War in the 2400s. It also leads to such things as Sandra Pickens, a colonial-born Starfleet captain with a ''very'' thick ([[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian-based]]) accent, being repeatedly [[PassedOverPromotion passed over for promotion]] when her very real skills as a starship commander would normally warrant it.it.
* Rather pointedly {{averted}} in ''Fanfic/BaitAndSwitchSTO'', whose author has argued on the ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' forums that even though out-of-universe ''Franchise/StarTrek'' often allegorizes aspects of human culture and history, InUniverse the Federation is supposed to be more than just humans and therefore major nonhuman characters should be more common. The primary viewpoint character of TheVerse, Kanril Eleya, is a Bajoran who only has one human on her CommandRoster (the chief medical officer, who rarely has a speaking role due to being down in sickbay most of the time).



* Parodied to hell and back in a scene in ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'' where Arthur is looking for a planet of humanoids and must seek advice from a '''very''' [[StarfishAliens alien Alien]]. And then further, when the planet it recommends has a population that might [[HumanAliens look human]], but are psychologically less human than any alien he's met thus far.

to:

* Parodied to hell and back in a scene in ''Literature/MostlyHarmless'' where Arthur is looking for a planet of humanoids and must seek advice from a '''very''' [[StarfishAliens alien Alien]]. And then further, when the planet it recommends has a population that might [[HumanAliens look human]], but are psychologically less human than any alien he's met thus far. The book's title itself derives from an earlier joke where Ford Prefect named himself after [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Prefect the car]] under the mistaken assumption that cars and not humans were the dominant life-form on Earth (subsequently describing Earth in the Guide as "mostly harmless" after nearly being run over while trying to introduce himself).



* Nearly every novel in the ''Literature/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' puts humans - and humans from the movies, at that - in all of the important positions. The same two human women switch back and forth as President of the New Republic. Humans are the important Jedi, the major heroes, the minor characters, and quite often the major villains. Nonhumans are relatively rarely in prominent positive roles; they're typically the minor villains, the {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, in supporting roles at best, though sometimes they do manage to be ScaryDogmaticAliens. Some books try to justify this by saying that when the New Republic was the Rebel Alliance it was humans who founded it and those who survived stayed in power, and that humans are probably the most populous species out there.

to:

* Nearly every novel in the ''Literature/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' puts humans - and humans from the movies, at that - in all of the important positions. The same two human women (Leia Organa Solo and Mon Mothma) switch back and forth as President of the New Republic. Humans are the important Jedi, the major heroes, the minor characters, and quite often the major villains. Nonhumans are relatively rarely in prominent positive roles; they're typically the minor villains, the {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, in supporting roles at best, though sometimes they do manage to be ScaryDogmaticAliens. Some books try to justify this by saying that when the New Republic was the Rebel Alliance it was humans who founded it and those who survived stayed in power, and that humans are probably the most populous species out there.



* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' novels, in which a nonhumanoid crew member takes bets on whether the ship's motto will be a human proverb despite the extreme diversity of the ship's crew, and loses when the Vulcan saying "Infinite diversity in infinite combinations" is chosen. He asks whether Vulcans count as human, as they're far more humanlike than a cybernetically-enhanced featherless ostrich with a prehensile tail..



* The various ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series: for all the non-human races around, the captain of each ship is always human and the crew is always ''primarily'' human. Getting more multicultural, but almost all ''human'' cultures. There have been a good number of on-screen portrayals of Vulcan Starfleet captains, but Vulcans are so ''hugely'' humanoid that may or may not count. Economical effects are a fairly recent thing, so you will only see very alien non-humanoid races in the films, comic books, and more recent series. (Which sets up one heck of a ContinuitySnarl in ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''.)
** Indeed, even the aliens use the word "humanoid".
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse ''Titan'' novels, in which a nonhumanoid crew member takes bets on whether the ship's motto will be a human proverb despite the extreme diversity of the ship's crew, and loses when the Vulcan saying "Infinite diversity in infinite combinations" is chosen. He asks whether Vulcans count as human, as they're far more humanlike than a cybernetically-enhanced featherless ostrich with a prehensile tail..

to:

* The various ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series: for series:
** For
all the non-human races around, the captain of each ship is always human and the crew is always ''primarily'' human. Getting more multicultural, but almost all ''human'' cultures. There have been a good number of on-screen portrayals of Vulcan Starfleet captains, but Vulcans are so ''hugely'' humanoid that may or may not count. Economical effects are a fairly recent thing, so you will only see very alien non-humanoid races in the films, comic books, and more recent series. (Which sets up one heck of a ContinuitySnarl in ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise''.)
**
) Indeed, even the aliens use the word "humanoid".
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse ''Titan'' novels, in which a nonhumanoid crew member takes bets on whether the ship's motto will be a human proverb despite the extreme diversity of the ship's crew, and loses when the Vulcan saying "Infinite diversity in infinite combinations" is chosen. He asks whether Vulcans count as human, as they're far more humanlike than a cybernetically-enhanced featherless ostrich with a prehensile tail..
"humanoid".



* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' came closest to averting this. Less than half of the main characters are human, and the supporting/recurring cast is overwhelmingly alien. It's implied that, despite the Federation being one body, Federation ships tend to be made up of primarily one race. There are a couple instances where we meet all-Vulcan Federation ships, or of new crew members coming aboard who are only used to dealing with their own race. In the Expanded Universe, there is a Starfleet vessel with an all-Horta crew.

to:

* ** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' came closest to averting this. Less than half of the main characters are human, and the supporting/recurring cast is overwhelmingly alien. It's implied that, despite the Federation being one body, Federation ships tend to be made up of primarily one race. There are a couple instances where we meet all-Vulcan Federation ships, or of new crew members coming aboard who are only used to dealing with their own race. In Creator/RonMoore, who contributed heavily to ''[=DS9=]'', [[WordOfGod remarked that]] the Expanded Universe, there is a overabundance of humans [[RealLifeWritesThePlot was primarily budget-related]], though this doesn't explain how the series managed to put {{Rubber Forehead|Alien}}s on easily half the civilian extras in any given episode but only rarely on extras in Starfleet vessel with an all-Horta crew.uniform.



** Creator/RussellTDavies is a well-known practitioner of this trope in his ''Series/DoctorWho'' work. He has opined more than once that people don't want to see "Zog Monsters" on the "planet Zog" and only gradually introduced alien planets into the series. In the first three whole seasons of his ''Doctor Who'', more than half of the episodes happened on Earth. The others visited human-made satellites, other human-settled worlds, and even human colonies in deep space... but only one locations visited in those 41 episodes was not dominated by humans (and even then, the most important guest star was, wait for it, a human - although barely recognizable as such)

to:

** * Creator/RussellTDavies is a well-known practitioner of this trope in his ''Series/DoctorWho'' work. He has opined more than once that people don't want to see "Zog Monsters" on the "planet Zog" and only gradually introduced alien planets into the series. In the first three whole seasons of his ''Doctor Who'', more than half of the episodes happened on Earth. The others visited human-made satellites, other human-settled worlds, and even human colonies in deep space... but only one locations visited in those 41 episodes was not dominated by humans (and even then, the most important guest star was, wait for it, a human - although barely recognizable as such)
23rd Dec '17 1:02:33 PM StarSword
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* {{Deconstructed}} in ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters''. The overabundance of humans from Earth in canon Starfleet is attributed to a ''cultural'' dominance of Earthlings in the Federation writ large. This leads to resentment towards Earthlings by many groups in the Federation. It also leads to such things as Sandra Pickens, a colonial-born Starfleet captain with a ''very'' thick ([[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian-based]]) accent, being repeatedly [[PassedOverPromotion passed over for promotion]] when her very real skills as a starship commander would normally warrant it.
28th Nov '17 11:20:07 AM pvsage
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Averted by many religions which claim certain holy books are dictated by [[OurGodsAreDifferent deities]], spirits, etc.

to:

* Averted Zigzagged by many religions which claim certain holy books are dictated by [[OurGodsAreDifferent deities]], spirits, etc., but attribute human traits like jealousy and wrath to these spirits and portray them in anthropomorphic forms. Averted in pantheism and the Hindu elephant god Ganesha.
27th Nov '17 12:47:12 PM UchuuFlamenco
Is there an issue? Send a Message



* In BillAndTedsBogusJourney, Death rolls his eyes when Bill & Ted assume that the greatest scientist in the universe must be human. However it wasn't such a bad assumption when it turns out that Station is the only (two) non human in Heaven!

to:

\n* In BillAndTedsBogusJourney, ''Film/BillAndTedsBogusJourney'', Death rolls his eyes when Bill & Ted assume that the greatest scientist in the universe must be human. However it wasn't such a bad assumption when it turns out that Station is the only (two) non human in Heaven!
5th Nov '17 7:53:34 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->''That cloud of stars is our galaxy, the Milky Way. Our solar system is on the edge of it. We hurl through an incomprehensible darkness. In cosmic terms, we are subatomic particles in a grain of sand on an infinite beach.\\

to:

->''That ->''"That cloud of stars is our galaxy, the Milky Way. Our solar system is on the edge of it. We hurl through an incomprehensible darkness. In cosmic terms, we are subatomic particles in a grain of sand on an infinite beach.\\



I wonder what's on TV now.''

to:

I wonder what's on TV now.''"''
10th Oct '17 7:38:14 PM Psychadelico
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Where the story falls along the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism depends on how good, valuable, or justified the human condition is evaluated to be. In idealistic stories, a {{Transhuman}}, {{Cyborg}}, DeityOfHumanOrigin, GodInHumanForm, {{Human Alien|s}} or {{Ridiculously Human Robot|s}} will invariably PickYourHumanHalf. They will find that having human emotions is good and human systems of morality work equally well or better than their own. Some of them may even yield to basic human drives/instincts, such as [[BoldlyComing sexual]] [[RoboSexual relations]] [[DivineDate with]] [[DidYouJustRomanceCthulhu humans]].

to:

* Where the story falls along the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism depends on how good, valuable, or justified the human condition is evaluated to be. In idealistic stories, a {{Transhuman}}, {{Cyborg}}, DeityOfHumanOrigin, GodInHumanForm, {{Human Alien|s}} or {{Ridiculously Human Robot|s}} will invariably PickYourHumanHalf.PickYourHumanHalf, while ScaryDogmaticAliens and [[EldritchAbomination Eldritch Abominations]] who aren't beaten back or destroyed entirely will find ''something'' admirable or lovable about the old [[CallAHumanAMeatbag organ-sacks]]. They will find that having human emotions is good and human systems of morality work equally well or better than their own. Some of them may even [[HumanityIsInfectious yield to basic human drives/instincts, drives/instincts]], such as [[BoldlyComing sexual]] [[RoboSexual relations]] [[DivineDate with]] [[DidYouJustRomanceCthulhu humans]].
21st Sep '17 11:24:55 AM torru369
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Except for Glaceon, Which is a bit like a cat

to:

** Except for Glaceon, Which is a bit like a catcat.
** Also there's a high tendency for Ash's more powerful Pokemon to be bipedal and thus more human like. While he does have other monsters who have decent levels of competency, none have ever been his regional ace. Just compare Torterra and Infernape's battling records.
This list shows the last 10 events of 283. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MostWritersAreHuman