History Main / MisplacedWildLife

17th Feb '18 2:33:08 AM EdnaWalker
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* ''Disney/TheLionKing'' came reallyclose to avoiding this trope... if only it wasn't for those leaf-cutting ants, native to South America. Whoops. "I Just Can't Wait to be King" also features what appear to be spider monkeys (also South America) and anteaters (though perhaps they were meant to be aardvarks), though since it's the film's DisneyAcidSequence, it's debatable how much it counts. The sequel also slips up by putting an exclusively rainforest-dwelling Okapi in the savanna… although it ''is'' an African species, just from the wrong part of Africa. And then there's the ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' version of ''The Lion King,'' which for some reason, featured tigers living in what appears to be Africa. Though [[{{Deconstruction}} knowing]] ''[[RuleOfFunny Animaniacs]]'', this may have been a LampshadeHanging on the above instances. The ''Animaniacs'' version also apparently kept the leafcutter ants. If you ''really'' want to split hairs, meerkats (Timon's species) live only in Southern Africa in Namibia, Botswana and South Africa, while Mandrills (Rafiki's species) are restricted to an area of western Central Africa comprising Equatorial Guinea and parts of Cameroon, Gabon and Congo. The tropes ends up being played for laughs in the Look-And-Find adaptation in the first part. What else would some call a kangaroo, a red fox, a penguin, a horned owl, a striped skunk and a giant panda bear in the wilds of Africa anyway?

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* ''Disney/TheLionKing'' came reallyclose to avoiding this trope... if only it wasn't for those leaf-cutting ants, native to South America. Whoops. "I Just Can't Wait to be King" also features what appear to be spider monkeys (also South America) and anteaters (though perhaps they were meant to be aardvarks), though since it's the film's DisneyAcidSequence, it's debatable how much it counts. The sequel also slips up by putting an exclusively rainforest-dwelling Okapi in the savanna… although it ''is'' an African species, just from the wrong part of Africa. And then there's the ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' version of ''The Lion King,'' which for some reason, featured tigers living in what appears to be Africa. Though [[{{Deconstruction}} knowing]] ''[[RuleOfFunny Animaniacs]]'', this may have been a LampshadeHanging on the above instances. The ''Animaniacs'' version also apparently kept the leafcutter ants. If you ''really'' want to split hairs, meerkats (Timon's species) live only in Southern Africa in Namibia, Botswana and South Africa, while Mandrills (Rafiki's species) are restricted to an area of western Central Africa comprising Equatorial Guinea and parts of Cameroon, Gabon and Congo. The tropes ends up being played for laughs in the Look-And-Find adaptation in the first part. What else would some call a kangaroo, a red fox, fox [[note]]One of the places they are found in is North Africa.[[/note]], a penguin, penguin [[note]]The African or Jackass penguin is found in Namibia and South Africa.[[/note]], a horned owl, a striped skunk skunk, and a giant panda bear in the wilds of Africa anyway?
11th Feb '18 6:12:49 PM HeroGal2347
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* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'' had Scrooge [=McDuck=], the nephews, Webby, and Ms. Beakley go to Antarctica to protect a colony of penguins from a giant carnivorous walrus that was trapped in an ice cube for thousands of years, but was accidentally freed by Webby's tuning fork, causing said ice cube to shatter. In real life, walruses are native to the Arctic, not Antarctica. A leopard seal would be more appropriate however, since they are giant seals that live near Antartica which feed on penguins.

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* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'' ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'' had Scrooge [=McDuck=], the nephews, Webby, and Ms. Beakley go to Antarctica to protect a colony of penguins from a giant carnivorous walrus that was trapped in an ice cube for thousands of years, but was accidentally freed by Webby's tuning fork, causing said ice cube to shatter. In real life, walruses are native to the Arctic, not Antarctica. A leopard seal would be more appropriate however, since they are giant seals that live near Antartica which feed on penguins.
7th Feb '18 3:14:55 PM margdean56
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* Tobias' ModeLock in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' turns him into a hawk- specifically, a red-tailed hawk- presumably so that readers would know what his distinctive "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI1hruZ0Rvo TSEEEEEEERRR!]]" cry sounds like.

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* Tobias' ModeLock in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' turns him into a hawk- specifically, hawk--specifically, a red-tailed hawk- presumably hawk--presumably so that readers would know what his distinctive "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI1hruZ0Rvo TSEEEEEEERRR!]]" cry sounds like.
7th Feb '18 3:05:56 PM margdean56
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* Real Life Misplaced Wildlife is a ''serious'' problem as it can potentially create an invasive species. Someone winds up bringing over an exotic pet and either releases it when it's too much trouble or it escapes on its own, eventually finding a mate of similar background and reproducing. Depending on what animal it is, the climate, lack of predators, and abundance of prey that doesn't know how to avoid/escape them means they flourish well above what they do in their native territory, becoming a nuisance at best and a threat to humans at worst. Though this isn't always bad, as moving animals to new climates without natural predators has saved some species from extinction.

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* Real Life Misplaced Wildlife is a ''serious'' problem as it can potentially create an invasive species. Someone winds up bringing brings over an exotic pet and either releases it when it's too much trouble or it escapes on its own, eventually finding a mate of similar background and reproducing. Depending on what animal it is, the climate, lack of predators, and abundance of prey that doesn't know how to avoid/escape them means they flourish well above what they do in their native territory, becoming a nuisance at best and a threat to humans at worst. Though this isn't always bad, as moving animals to new climates without natural predators has saved some species from extinction.



* There's a stable population of ring necked parakeets in South Eastern England, London, and other European cities as Madrid- its not uncommon to see trees covered in the little green birds as well as with their spherical nests in such places as Ramsgate or the Casa de Campo in the latter.

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* There's a stable population of ring necked parakeets in South Eastern England, London, and other European cities such as Madrid- its Madrid--it's not uncommon to see trees covered in the little green birds as well as with their spherical nests in such places as Ramsgate or the Casa de Campo in the latter.



* Birds occasionally fly to places they aren't normally seen in, such as Siberian birds in Alaska or American birds in Europe, due to being blown off course by strong winds during their migration. That said, this is such a rare occurrence, it tends to make the news.

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* Birds occasionally fly to places they aren't normally seen in, such as Siberian birds in Alaska or American birds in Europe, due to being blown off course by strong winds during their migration. That said, this is such a rare occurrence, it tends to make the news.news and draw eager birdwatchers from all over the country.



** The same Monk Parakeets thrive in Florida, and also in isolated colonies in several other major American cities including Chicago. Technically these are "introduced" rather than misplaced -- They were released as pets and have become feral versus winding up in the wrong place due to some natural phenomenon. This is unfortunately pretty common, as evidenced by the ''European'' Starling being ubiquitous across North America and the also European House Sparrow now being one of the most numerous birds on the continent, despite the latter's declining numbers in countries it is native to according to its article on [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} That Other Wiki]]. Amazingly, both of these species have only been introduced to North America in the last 150 years or so. A story mentioning flocks of House Sparrows in New York City would have qualified for this trope as being wrong not that long ago.

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** The same Monk Parakeets thrive in Florida, and also in isolated colonies in several other major American cities including Chicago. Technically these are "introduced" rather than misplaced -- They they were released as pets and have become feral versus winding up in the wrong place due to some natural phenomenon. This is unfortunately pretty common, as evidenced by the ''European'' Starling being ubiquitous across North America and the also European House Sparrow now being one of the most numerous birds on the continent, despite the latter's declining numbers in countries it is native to according to its article on [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} That Other Wiki]]. Amazingly, both of these species have were only been introduced to North America in the last 150 years or so. A story mentioning flocks of House Sparrows in New York City would have qualified for this trope as being wrong not that long ago.



** The common parakeet, or budgie has been marching, proverbially, into the Netherlands driving out the native Sparrow (which as mention above is doing just fine in its non-native North American habitats).
** The Rock Pigeon[[note]]or Rock Dove as it was called before ornithologist organizations adopted a name more consistent with the bird more often informally being called a pigeon than a dove[[/note]] ended up this way due to human intervention. The species's adaptability combined with feral populations ending up on every continent except for Antarctica ended up giving what originally lived on European cliffs a very wide range, to the point where their non-native status outside their original range isn't brought up much due to how common and widespread they are, as well as the fact that these countries often have their own native species of doves and pigeons, in contrast to how the House Sparrow and European Starling stand out in North America since their families are mostly restricted to the Old World; although the Americas have species called sparrows, they're actually in the same family as Old World buntings[[note]]Details on the page for CallASmeerpARabbit[[/note]]. The fact that Rock Pigeons outside their native habitat are descended from domesticated specimens also results in varying colors among individuals.

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** The common parakeet, or budgie budgie, has been marching, proverbially, into the Netherlands driving out the native Sparrow (which as mention above is doing just fine in its non-native North American habitats).
** The Rock Pigeon[[note]]or Rock Dove as it was called before ornithologist organizations adopted a name more consistent with the bird more often informally being called a pigeon than a dove[[/note]] ended up this way due to human intervention. The species's adaptability combined with feral populations ending up on every continent except for Antarctica ended up giving what birds that originally lived on European cliffs a very wide range, to the point where their non-native status outside their original range isn't brought up much due to how common and widespread they are, as well as the fact that these countries often have their own native species of doves and pigeons, in contrast to how the House Sparrow and European Starling stand out in North America since their families are mostly restricted to the Old World; although the Americas have species called sparrows, they're actually in the same family as Old World buntings[[note]]Details on the page for CallASmeerpARabbit[[/note]]. The fact that Rock Pigeons outside their native habitat are descended from domesticated specimens also results in varying colors among individuals.



* Every now and again, a walrus will be seen in or around Northern Scotland, even though that's still quite a ways away from the walrus' natural habitat, the Arctic Circle.

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* Every now and again, a walrus will be seen in or around Northern Scotland, even though that's still quite a ways away from the walrus' walrus's natural habitat, the Arctic Circle.
7th Feb '18 2:50:52 PM margdean56
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* The origin of the first Black Condor (in an issue of ''Crack Comics'') has the his parents being killed while they were in Mongolia and himself being raised by condors... which live nowhere near Mongolia.

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* The origin of the first Black Condor (in an issue of ''Crack Comics'') has the his parents being killed while they were in Mongolia and himself being raised by condors... which live nowhere near Mongolia.
7th Feb '18 2:48:42 PM margdean56
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Can qualify as a full-fledged [[ArtisticLicenseBiology biology fail]] in cases where the animal wouldn't even be able to ''survive'' in the environment where it's depicted, never mind being in the wrong place. Fishes are perhaps the most common victims of this, as when freshwater species such as piranha or electric eels are shown living in the ocean, salinity ought to kill them in minutes.

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Can qualify as a full-fledged [[ArtisticLicenseBiology biology fail]] in cases where the animal wouldn't even be able to ''survive'' in the environment where it's depicted, never mind being in the wrong place. Fishes are perhaps the most common victims of this, as when freshwater species such as piranha or electric eels are shown living in the ocean, where salinity ought to kill them in minutes.



Naturally, this trope occurs much less often when the filming actually takes place within the area where the story is set. Also, this trope generally applies only to normal animals. {{Funny Animal}}s can be easily called as immigrants of some sort if found out of their element. A few cases might be explained with CreatorProvincialism, as the creators [[WriteWhoYouKnow incorporate the animals they're are most familiar with]].

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Naturally, this trope occurs much less often when the filming actually takes place within in the area where the story is set. Also, this trope generally applies only to normal animals. {{Funny Animal}}s can be easily called as immigrants of some sort if found out of their element. A few cases might be explained with by CreatorProvincialism, as the creators [[WriteWhoYouKnow incorporate the animals they're are most familiar with]].
1st Feb '18 6:43:15 AM Korodzik
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* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' features oryxes really close to a war-ravaged city, [[spoiler:and one appears in the middle of downtown after an explosion and inrush of thirsty people that'd scare off any skittish prey like an antelope. [[{{Hallucinations}} They might even
not be real]]. The [[NightmareFuel/SpecOpstheLine Nightmare Fuel page for the game]] has more details.]]

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* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' features oryxes really close to a war-ravaged city, [[spoiler:and one appears in the middle of downtown after an explosion and inrush of thirsty people that'd scare off any skittish prey like an antelope. [[{{Hallucinations}} They might even
even not be real]]. The [[NightmareFuel/SpecOpstheLine Nightmare Fuel page for the game]] has more details.]]]]
* The old interactive fiction game ''Amazon'' has a scene with a hippo... in Peru. It might have something to do with the fact that the game is a SerialNumbersFiledOff adaptation of the Africa-set novel ''Literature/{{Congo}}''.
5th Jan '18 2:31:26 AM BigJimbo
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* Averted in the Coke commercials with the polar bear family for almost a decade... until [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIk7Q_DJIgQ this 2006 commercial.]] ''Sigh...'' Possibly justified in that the penguins are on vacation, as they float in on patches of ice.

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* Averted in the Coke commercials with the polar bear family for almost a decade... decade, until [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIk7Q_DJIgQ this 2006 commercial.]] ''Sigh...'' Possibly justified in that the penguins are on vacation, as they float in on patches of ice.



* ''Disney/TheLionKing'' came oh-so-close to avoiding this trope... if only it wasn't for those leaf-cutting ants, native to South America. Whoops. "I Just Can't Wait to be King" also features what appear to be spider monkeys (also South America) and anteaters (though perhaps they were meant to be aardvarks), though since it's the film's DisneyAcidSequence, it's debatable how much it counts. The sequel also slips up by putting an exclusively rainforest-dwelling Okapi in the savanna… although it ''is'' an African species, just from the wrong part of Africa. And then there's the ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' version of ''The Lion King,'' which for some reason, featured tigers living in what appears to be Africa. Though [[{{Deconstruction}} knowing]] ''[[RuleOfFunny Animaniacs]]'', this may have been a LampshadeHanging on the above instances. The ''Animaniacs'' version also apparently kept the leafcutter ants. If you ''really'' want to split hairs, meerkats (Timon's species) live only in Southern Africa in Namibia, Botswana and South Africa, while Mandrills (Rafiki's species) are restricted to an area of western Central Africa comprising Equatorial Guinea and parts of Cameroon, Gabon and Congo. The tropes ends up being played for laughs in the Look-And-Find adaptation in the first part. What else would some call a kangaroo, a red fox, a penguin, a horned owl, a striped skunk and a giant panda bear in the wilds of Africa anyway?

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* ''Disney/TheLionKing'' came oh-so-close came reallyclose to avoiding this trope... if only it wasn't for those leaf-cutting ants, native to South America. Whoops. "I Just Can't Wait to be King" also features what appear to be spider monkeys (also South America) and anteaters (though perhaps they were meant to be aardvarks), though since it's the film's DisneyAcidSequence, it's debatable how much it counts. The sequel also slips up by putting an exclusively rainforest-dwelling Okapi in the savanna… although it ''is'' an African species, just from the wrong part of Africa. And then there's the ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' version of ''The Lion King,'' which for some reason, featured tigers living in what appears to be Africa. Though [[{{Deconstruction}} knowing]] ''[[RuleOfFunny Animaniacs]]'', this may have been a LampshadeHanging on the above instances. The ''Animaniacs'' version also apparently kept the leafcutter ants. If you ''really'' want to split hairs, meerkats (Timon's species) live only in Southern Africa in Namibia, Botswana and South Africa, while Mandrills (Rafiki's species) are restricted to an area of western Central Africa comprising Equatorial Guinea and parts of Cameroon, Gabon and Congo. The tropes ends up being played for laughs in the Look-And-Find adaptation in the first part. What else would some call a kangaroo, a red fox, a penguin, a horned owl, a striped skunk and a giant panda bear in the wilds of Africa anyway?



* The Quails also appear (to cluck with disapproval at the Dwarves' dirty floor) in ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' (which also featured raccoons, both native to North America), which is implied to take place in Europe. Those Quails get around!
* And there they are again in ''Disney/SleepingBeauty''!
* And there they are AGAIN again in ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}''! Now, it is true that some animals ranged farther into the eastern parts of North America in pre-colonial times, but come on, and that's not even touching on the moose. It leads one to think that the filmmakers have never even been to Virginia, given the spectacular ArtisticLicenseGeography of the landscape. Elk would have been more accurate if they were looking for something larger than a white-tail in Colonial times. There's also a large grizzly bear with cubs, even though there are only black bears in Virginia.

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* The Quails also appear (to cluck with disapproval at the Dwarves' dirty floor) in ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' (which also featured raccoons, both native to North America), America)and ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'', which is implied to take place in Europe. Those Quails get around!
Europe.
* And there they are again in ''Disney/SleepingBeauty''!
* And there they are AGAIN again in ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}''! Now, it
''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' has the quails (once again) and a moose. It is true that some animals ranged farther into the eastern parts of North America in pre-colonial times, but come on, and that's not even touching on the moose.still. It leads one to think that the filmmakers have never even been to Virginia, given the spectacular ArtisticLicenseGeography of the landscape. Elk would have been more accurate if they were looking for something larger than a white-tail in Colonial times. There's also a large grizzly bear with cubs, even though there are only black bears in Virginia.



* ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' has animals misplaced in time as well as space. At the very least, they used animals that were all around after the dinosaurs died out (with the exception of the second film's hesperornithines, mostly flightless Mesozoic diving birds). Especially confusing the mains haven't aged between the two movies, but they're set at opposite ends of the titular ice age... And then comes ''Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs'', when the first movie had ''humans''. Oy... The dinosaurs are at least living in a LostWorld, but the genera there are as misplaced in location and time as the other animals in the series.

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* ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' has animals misplaced in time as well as space. At the very least, they used animals that were all around after the dinosaurs died out (with the exception of the second film's hesperornithines, mostly flightless Mesozoic diving birds). Especially confusing the mains haven't aged between the two movies, but they're set at opposite ends of the titular ice age... And then comes ''Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs'', when the first movie had ''humans''. Oy... The dinosaurs are at least living in a LostWorld, but the genera there are as misplaced in location and time as the other animals in the series.



* The stop-motion animation of ''WesternAnimation/FantasticMrFox'' comes very close to entering this trope, depending on your interpretation of the film. Although American animals such as the possum and grey fox are present, this could just very well be an artistic choice on the director's part. After all, some of the animals that could have more easily been represented by their American counterparts, such as the badger, were instead obviously portrayed as the Eurasian variety -- fitting as the film is set in the English countryside. Some believe that because the animals are all portrayed as American, and the humans as English, the film could represent the American Revolution... in which case, is it acceptable for a few of the animals to be American species, if a theme of the film is all about said animals/culture fighting for their own identity? Mind = blown.

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* The stop-motion animation of ''WesternAnimation/FantasticMrFox'' comes very close to entering this trope, depending on your interpretation of the film. Although American animals such as the possum and grey fox are present, this could just very well be an artistic choice on the director's part. After all, some of the animals that could have more easily been represented by their American counterparts, such as the badger, were instead obviously portrayed as the Eurasian variety -- fitting as the film is set in the English countryside. Some believe that because the animals are all portrayed as American, and the humans as English, the film could represent the American Revolution... in which case, is it acceptable for a few of the animals to be American species, if a theme of the film is all about said animals/culture fighting for their own identity? Mind = blown.identity?



* Disney's version of ''PeterPan'' skirts this trope. There are North American and African animals living on the same continent, and also presumably within a few miles of each other -- and in their native habitats, too! They (partly) justify it by implying (during Peter and the kids' flight from London) that Neverland exists in a separate solar system and thus is a different planet (which makes the pirates and the Indians examples of FantasyCounterpartCulture). At least the crocodile doesn't stick out too badly, since crocodiles ''are'' found in the Caribbean, which is the kind of place you'd expect to encounter folks like Captain Hook and his crew.

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* Disney's version of ''PeterPan'' skirts this trope. There are North American and African animals living on the same continent, and also presumably within a few miles of each other -- and in their native habitats, too! too. They (partly) justify it by implying (during Peter and the kids' flight from London) that Neverland exists in a separate solar system and thus is a different planet (which makes the pirates and the Indians examples of FantasyCounterpartCulture). At least the crocodile doesn't stick out too badly, since crocodiles ''are'' found in the Caribbean, which is the kind of place you'd expect to encounter folks like Captain Hook and his crew.



* ''Film/AnacondasTheHuntForTheBloodOrchid'' took place in Asia (specifically Borneo) -- even though most of the animals in the film are native to South America, particularly the title serpent itself (to say nothing of the tiger that appears briefly, since it's native to neither South America nor Borneo). This may be a case of failing geography rather than biology, as they might've belatedly decided to change the film's location. There's also the DEADLY golden silk orb-weaver seen several times during the film. Impressively, it's not too out of place (''Nephila'' is a very widespread genus, and there are several Asian species). On the other hand, it's not exactly DEADLY, as the many, ''many'' people who live with these things could easily tell you.
* The Transylvanian armadillos(!) in ''Film/{{Dracula|1931}}'' (1931). There's also an opossum; Browning probably meant for them to stand in as giant rats, but...

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* ''Film/AnacondasTheHuntForTheBloodOrchid'' took place in Asia (specifically Borneo) -- even though most of the animals in the film are native to South America, particularly the title serpent itself (to say nothing of the tiger that appears briefly, since it's native to neither South America nor Borneo). This may be a case of failing geography rather than biology, as they might've belatedly decided to change the film's location. There's also the DEADLY deadly golden silk orb-weaver seen several times during the film. Impressively, it's not too out of place (''Nephila'' is a very widespread genus, and there are several Asian species). On the other hand, it's not exactly DEADLY, deadly, as the many, ''many'' people who live with these things could easily tell you.
* The Transylvanian armadillos(!) armadillos in ''Film/{{Dracula|1931}}'' (1931). There's also an opossum; Browning probably meant for them to stand in as giant rats, but...but still



* Creator/JessFranco's ''Count Dracula'' (aka ''El Conde Dracula'', 1970) lets us hear a Transylvanian ''kookaburra''! (No bird is onscreen; Franco apparently just wanted some dramatic sound and took whatever he could get.)

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* Creator/JessFranco's ''Count Dracula'' (aka ''El Conde Dracula'', 1970) lets us hear a Transylvanian ''kookaburra''! ''kookaburra'' (No bird is onscreen; Franco apparently just wanted some dramatic sound and took whatever he could get.)get).



* ''Film/MeanGirls'': During Cady's party, Aaron sees a picture of Cady back in Africa riding an elephant. An ''Asian'' elephant.

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* ''Film/MeanGirls'': During Cady's party, Aaron sees a picture of Cady back in Africa riding an elephant. An ''Asian'' elephant.



* The Pygmy Nuthatch in ''Film/CharliesAngels'' is a South American Troupial, a relation to the oriole -- a much bigger and different coloured bird. Pygmy Nuthatches are not found in one small spot like Cameron Diaz declares either. And the call heard in the movie matches neither bird!

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* The Pygmy Nuthatch in ''Film/CharliesAngels'' is a South American Troupial, a relation to the oriole -- a much bigger and different coloured bird. Pygmy Nuthatches are not found in one small spot like Cameron Diaz declares either. And the call heard in the movie matches neither bird!bird.



* ''Film/KingKong2005'' has large theropod dinosaurs that supposedly descended directly from TyrannosaurusRex. The problem? T. rex was a native of North America and would have never been anywhere near the pacific island this film takes place on. The same applies to every other single dinosaur, and most of the wildlife in general, on the island.

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* ''Film/KingKong2005'' has large theropod dinosaurs that supposedly descended directly from TyrannosaurusRex. The problem? problem is that T. rex was a native of North America and would have never been anywhere near the pacific island this film takes place on. The same applies to every other single dinosaur, and most of the wildlife in general, on the island.



** The jerboas, which show up at several points in the movie, must be quite lost; not only are they not found in India, they aren't even jungle inhabitants! They're found only in desert environments, and while some species are found in the arid parts of western Pakistan, that's the closest they ever get to Seoni.

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** The jerboas, which show up at several points in the movie, must be quite lost; not only are they not found in India, they aren't even jungle inhabitants! They're inhabitants: they're found only in desert environments, and while some species are found in the arid parts of western Pakistan, that's the closest they ever get to Seoni.



** So boobies aren't found in the same habitats as tits?



* ''On the Savannah, the freaking SAVANNAH, the lion sleeps tonight.'' (Lions do not live in the jungle.) Lions don't do much sleeping tonight or any other night, either. They're chiefly nocturnal, so do most of their sleeping during the day.

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* ''On "In the Savannah, Jungle, the freaking SAVANNAH, mighty jungle, the lion sleeps tonight.'' (Lions do not " Lions sctually don't live in the jungle.) Lions jungle, and they don't do much sleeping tonight or any other night, either. They're chiefly nocturnal, so they do most of their sleeping during the day.



* Much of the action of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/AsYouLikeIt'' takes place in the Forest of Arden. There is some debate about whether that refers to the Arden near Stratford, in England, or the Ardennes of the Franco-Belgian border region. However, what is certain is that, in both places, there is little chance of being attacked by a lion. This gets even sillier in some productions, like the Creator/KennethBranagh film adaptation set in ''[[UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration Meiji-era Japan!]]''

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* Much of the action of Shakespeare's ''Theatre/AsYouLikeIt'' takes place in the Forest of Arden. There is some debate about whether that refers to the Arden near Stratford, in England, or the Ardennes of the Franco-Belgian border region. However, what is certain is that, in both places, there is little chance of being attacked by a lion. This gets even sillier in some productions, like the Creator/KennethBranagh film adaptation set in ''[[UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration Meiji-era Japan!]]''Japan.]]''



* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', which is set in a densely wooded Russian jungle (huh?), is positively loaded with species that simply aren't supposed to be there, reaching right into the cryptozoological on occasion. This meta reason is that it was an attempt by Hideo Kojima to keep players from guessing the location of Snake Eater from the demos. In the game one of your MissionControl later {{Hand Wave}}s this by claiming the Soviets brought them in as "test subjects."
* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog''. Marine the Raccoon uses [[LandDownUnder Australian slang]], while the actual echidna has an American accent. Also, said echidna is a descendant of the Maya civilization, a Mesoamerican tribe, and has dreadlocks. %% There's a fancomic somewhere with Knuckles freaking out over trying to figure out his nationality. %% Link?

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* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', which is set in a densely wooded Russian jungle (huh?), jungle, is positively loaded with species that simply aren't supposed to be there, reaching right into the cryptozoological on occasion. This meta reason is that it was an attempt by Hideo Kojima to keep players from guessing the location of Snake Eater from the demos. In the game one of your MissionControl later {{Hand Wave}}s this by claiming the Soviets brought them in as "test subjects."
* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog''. Marine the Raccoon uses [[LandDownUnder Australian slang]], while the actual echidna has an American accent. Also, said echidna is a descendant of the Maya civilization, a Mesoamerican tribe, and has dreadlocks. %% There's a fancomic somewhere with Knuckles freaking out over trying to figure out his nationality. %% Link?



* ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot''. Being on fictional Australian islands, one could be forgiven for having mainland and island species together in one place. One could also be forgiven for having Tasmanian Tigers and Dingoes (the former is classed as extinct although people claim that they've seen it since, and the latter is not technically a native species but could have been brought over from the mainland), but why on Earth is there an island inhabited by POLAR BEARS? That just misses the wrong hemisphere, never mind continent. A more subtle mistake is the Komodo Dragon (a species native to islands in Indonesia). The anthropomorphic characters can be somewhat justified by the fact that they're all N.Cortex's experiments (and thus, may have been imported). The Polar Bear... Not so much.

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* ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot''. Being on fictional Australian islands, one could be forgiven for having mainland and island species together in one place. One could also be forgiven for having Tasmanian Tigers and Dingoes (the former is classed as extinct although people claim that they've seen it since, and the latter is not technically a native species but could have been brought over from the mainland), but why on Earth is there there's actually an island inhabited by POLAR BEARS? ''polar bears''. That just misses the wrong hemisphere, never mind continent. A more subtle mistake is the Komodo Dragon (a species native to islands in Indonesia). The anthropomorphic characters can be somewhat justified by the fact that they're all N.Cortex's experiments (and thus, may have been imported). The Polar Bear... Not so much.



* It tends to be discreet, but if you notice the raccoons showing up (often!) in ''Battle for Middle Earth II'', it will ruin the idea that Middle-Earth is supposed to be the Old World...

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* It tends to be discreet, but if you notice the raccoons showing up (often!) (often) in ''Battle for Middle Earth II'', it will ruin the idea that Middle-Earth is supposed to be the Old World...



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' and ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' apparently featured what appeared to be [[EverythingsBetterWithPenguins emperor penguins]] (native only to um, guess) living on various planets that otherwise have a tropical setting. And the inhabitants of the ice planets? ''Bunnies''. They could have been ''king'' penguins however, since they look exactly like emperor penguins, but live in the tropics. Seems to be an in universe example as well, as those penguins appear to be based on the ones from ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'', which were exclusive to the ice world.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' and ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' apparently featured what appeared to be [[EverythingsBetterWithPenguins emperor penguins]] (native only to um, guess) Antarctica) living on various planets that otherwise have a tropical setting. And the inhabitants of the ice planets? ''Bunnies''.planets are ''bunnies''. They could have been ''king'' penguins however, since they look exactly like emperor penguins, but live in the tropics. Seems to be an in universe example as well, as those penguins appear to be based on the ones from ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'', which were exclusive to the ice world.



* The PC game ''Zoo Vet'' and its sequel ''Zoo Vet: Endangered Species'' suffered from this (Oribi antelope in a temperate forest? Komodo dragons & Chilean flamingos in a rainforest? ''Bald eagles & tokay geckos in a desert?'').

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* The PC game ''Zoo Vet'' and its sequel ''Zoo Vet: Endangered Species'' suffered from this (Oribi antelope in a temperate forest? forest, Komodo dragons & Chilean flamingos in a rainforest? ''Bald rainforest and even ''bald eagles & tokay geckos in a desert?'').desert'').



* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' features oryxes. What are those skittish prey animals doing so close to a war-ravaged city? [[spoiler:And what is one doing in the middle of downtown after an explosion and inrush of thirsty people that'd scare off any skittish prey like an antelope? [[{{Hallucinations}} Are they even real]]? The [[NightmareFuel/SpecOpstheLine Nightmare Fuel page for the game]] has more details.]]

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* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' features oryxes. What are those skittish prey animals doing so oryxes really close to a war-ravaged city? [[spoiler:And what is city, [[spoiler:and one doing appears in the middle of downtown after an explosion and inrush of thirsty people that'd scare off any skittish prey like an antelope? antelope. [[{{Hallucinations}} Are they even real]]? They might even
not be real]].
The [[NightmareFuel/SpecOpstheLine Nightmare Fuel page for the game]] has more details.]]



*** [[CanisLatinicus Surprisibus! Surprisibus!]]

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*** [[CanisLatinicus "[[CanisLatinicus Surprisibus! Surprisibus!]]Surprisibus!]]"



* In a first-season episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'', the Tennysons cross a Mexican jungle in which a chameleon (complete with 3 horns and goggle-eyes) is visible in the treetops. True chameleons aren't native to the New World, although feral populations (of different species than the one shown!) do exist in California and Florida

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* In a first-season episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'', the Tennysons cross a Mexican jungle in which a chameleon (complete with 3 horns and goggle-eyes) is visible in the treetops. True chameleons aren't native to the New World, although feral populations (of different species than the one shown!) shown) do exist in California and Florida



* One Creator/TexAvery cartoon "Slap Happy Lion", had a once ferocious lion that terrified all the other animals in the jungle with his roars, including a zebra, flamingo, a trio crocodiles, ostrich, snakes, a gorilla, and... a kangaroo? Though one could argue a kangaroo might be ''more'' at home in a jungle than the lion is. Once again, lions do not actually live in jungles.

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* One Creator/TexAvery cartoon "Slap Happy Lion", had a once ferocious lion that terrified all the other animals in the jungle with his roars, including a zebra, flamingo, a trio crocodiles, ostrich, snakes, a gorilla, and... and even a kangaroo? kangaroo. Though one could argue a kangaroo might be ''more'' at home in a jungle than the lion is. Once again, lions do not actually live in jungles.



** Perhaps the most extreme example is ''penguins and orcas on Pluto''[[note]]In ''Futurama'', Pluto is portrayed basically as Antarctica as a planet. Yes, we do mean planet.[[/note]] in "The Birdbot Ice-catraz". And just to be clear, neither were an extraterrestrial species, they're ordinary Earth penguins and orcas. Absolutely no explanation is given to it.

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** Perhaps the most extreme example is ''penguins and orcas on Pluto''[[note]]In ''Futurama'', Pluto is portrayed basically as Antarctica as a planet. Yes, we do mean planet.[[/note]] in "The Birdbot Ice-catraz". And just to be clear, neither were an extraterrestrial species, they're ordinary Earth penguins and orcas. Absolutely no explanation is given to it.



* In the Californian city of Martinez, there's a local legend about a group of monkeys living in the creek. They even have a restaurant named after them!

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* In the Californian city of Martinez, there's a local legend about a group of monkeys living in the creek. They even have a restaurant named after them!them.



** Certain species of large constrictors often kept as pets have escaped or been illegally released when they got too big in such numbers that their populations in Florida may now be self-sustaining. So yes, [[OhCrap now we do have potentially man-eating snakes]].

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** Certain species of large constrictors often kept as pets have escaped or been illegally released when they got too big in such numbers that their populations in Florida may now be self-sustaining. So yes, [[OhCrap now we do have potentially man-eating snakes]].



** At another time, Ranma, Genma, and Sôun must find a way to get past the girls bathing in a hot spring. Genma and Sôun have the bright idea of painting Genma's panda form so he more closely resembles a vicious grizzly. The problem? The only paint they have on hand is ''white''. The girls immediately see through this. ("Whoever heard of a polar bear in ''Japan''?") Cue the bucket to the face.

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** At another time, Ranma, Genma, and Sôun must find a way to get past the girls bathing in a hot spring. Genma and Sôun have the bright idea of painting Genma's panda form so he more closely resembles a vicious grizzly. The problem? The However the only paint they have on hand is ''white''. The girls immediately see through this. this ("Whoever heard of a polar bear in ''Japan''?") ''Japan''?"). Cue the bucket to the face.



* The 3rd ''Hugo'' AdventureGame has an ''elephant'' in the ''Amazon''. When you go "Look Elephant", the flavor text sheepishly admits that elephants don't live in South America and [[{{Handwave}} explains it by it escaping from a circus]] and more or less admits it's just there to be a puzzle. Next question: Why is there a big circus in the middle of the Amazon Jungle? In the same ''Hugo'' game, the natives are eating "roast hyena". Hyenas are native to Africa and Asia, not South America.

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* The 3rd ''Hugo'' AdventureGame has an ''elephant'' ''elephant in the ''Amazon''.Amazon''. When you go "Look Elephant", the flavor text sheepishly admits that elephants don't live in South America and [[{{Handwave}} explains it by it escaping from a circus]] and more or less admits it's just there to be a puzzle. Next question: Why is there a big circus in the middle of the Amazon Jungle? In the same ''Hugo'' game, the natives are eating "roast hyena". Hyenas are native to Africa and Asia, not South America.



* In ''Webcomic/GunnerkriggCourt'' Andrew, when helping the animals of the Woods with their problems, meets an ''octopus'', somehow surviving on land and able to fly. His advice?

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* In ''Webcomic/GunnerkriggCourt'' Andrew, when helping the animals of the Woods with their problems, meets an ''octopus'', somehow surviving on land and able to fly. His advice?advice:



* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/GoDiegoGo''. [[DontExplainTheJoke It’s a show TEACHING kids about wildlife, so what do you expect?]]

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* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/GoDiegoGo''. [[DontExplainTheJoke It’s a show TEACHING teaching kids about wildlife, so what do you expect?]]



* A similar situation in the WesternAnimation/BugsBunny cartoon ''8-Ball Bunny'', in which Bugs reluctantly helps a little penguin get back home to the South Pole, only to learn that the penguin was born in captivity. In Hoboken!

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* A similar situation in the WesternAnimation/BugsBunny cartoon ''8-Ball Bunny'', in which Bugs reluctantly helps a little penguin get back home to the South Pole, only to learn that the penguin was born in captivity. In Hoboken!captivity, in Hoboken.
27th Dec '17 9:35:55 PM Kaiseror
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Added DiffLines:

* Many anime and manga taking place in ancient japan have wolves which did live in Japan before going extinct, however the appearance is usually that of gray wolves that live in Europe or North America while the Japanese Wolf looked like [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Honshu-wolf3.jpg this]].
13th Dec '17 11:34:15 PM PaulA
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* ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs 3D'': Alex's modern day incarnation is a rook, a corvid that isn't found in Alaska.

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* ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs ''Film/WalkingWithDinosaurs 3D'': Alex's modern day incarnation is a rook, a corvid that isn't found in Alaska.
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