History Main / MedievalStasis

18th Jun '16 11:47:54 PM nombretomado
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* [[EnforcedTrope Enforced]] by Rokugan's ruling samurai caste in ''LegendOfTheFiveRings''. Technology and magic are both very stringently regulated, with a strong cultural emphasis on the "Celestial Order."

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* [[EnforcedTrope Enforced]] by Rokugan's ruling samurai caste in ''LegendOfTheFiveRings''.''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings''. Technology and magic are both very stringently regulated, with a strong cultural emphasis on the "Celestial Order."
11th Jun '16 10:41:35 AM Morgenthaler
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* This is a common complaint/question about ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia''. Without even worrying about, say, the decades between ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' and ''The Silver Chair''--a ''thousand'' years pass between ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'' and ''Prince Caspian'', and seven generations between ''The Silver Chair'' and ''The Last Battle''. Technological achievement consists of one channel dug at Cair Paravel and one bridge built at Beruna. (Of course, this is one of those aggressively nostalgic cases where development is actively opposed by the protagonists and anyone who tries it gets put down in a hurry. Caspian actually says as much in ''Dawn Treader''--the issue is slavery, but they're talking in general terms. Even the author/narrator, when he's writing about our world, is always dropping in things like how sweets used to be cheaper and kids don't know to swear on the Bible anymore, and Eustace's liberal, modern upbringing is described basically as code to show that he's going to be an unsympathetic jerk. There are also a couple of technological anachronisms in Narnia, like Mrs. Beaver's sewing machine, to combine the medieval and twentieth-century nostalgia. Sewing machines good, Plumptree's Vitaminized Nerve Food bad.)

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* This is a common complaint/question about ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia''.''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia''. Without even worrying about, say, the decades between ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' and ''The Silver Chair''--a ''thousand'' years pass between ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'' and ''Prince Caspian'', and seven generations between ''The Silver Chair'' and ''The Last Battle''. Technological achievement consists of one channel dug at Cair Paravel and one bridge built at Beruna. (Of course, this is one of those aggressively nostalgic cases where development is actively opposed by the protagonists and anyone who tries it gets put down in a hurry. Caspian actually says as much in ''Dawn Treader''--the issue is slavery, but they're talking in general terms. Even the author/narrator, when he's writing about our world, is always dropping in things like how sweets used to be cheaper and kids don't know to swear on the Bible anymore, and Eustace's liberal, modern upbringing is described basically as code to show that he's going to be an unsympathetic jerk. There are also a couple of technological anachronisms in Narnia, like Mrs. Beaver's sewing machine, to combine the medieval and twentieth-century nostalgia. Sewing machines good, Plumptree's Vitaminized Nerve Food bad.)



* ''{{Redwall}}'''s world doesn't seem to have evolved at all in twenty books covering several hundred years. Maybe it's because they're all too busy dealing with the rapidly-breeding vermin threat to have time to invent much.

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* ''{{Redwall}}'''s ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'''s world doesn't seem to have evolved at all in twenty books covering several hundred years. Maybe it's because they're all too busy dealing with the rapidly-breeding vermin threat to have time to invent much.



* Somewhat toyed with in the ''SwordOfTruth'' series. In ''Naked Empire'', the protagonists discover the Empire of Bandakar, made up of the descendants of [[AntiMagic pristinely ungifted]] D'Haran exiles, which was sealed behind an Underworld barrier for over three thousand years. One Bandakaran, Owen, leads them past an Imperial Order occupation force to their capital city. When he proudly presents their great financial and cultural center, all Richard and Kahlan see is a city block full of tiny shops with studio apartments built above them. Richard even asks, "This is all your great culture has achieved in 3,000 years?", while a flummoxed Owen clearly thinks that the block of two-story shacks is up there with CrystalSpiresAndTogas. As for the rest of the world, the trope is more played straight, as the ancient world had thousands of mages serving the people's needs and as they gradually died out, the idea of using technology to fill the niche they left behind hasn't quite caught on yet.

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* Somewhat toyed with in the ''SwordOfTruth'' ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series. In ''Naked Empire'', the protagonists discover the Empire of Bandakar, made up of the descendants of [[AntiMagic pristinely ungifted]] D'Haran exiles, which was sealed behind an Underworld barrier for over three thousand years. One Bandakaran, Owen, leads them past an Imperial Order occupation force to their capital city. When he proudly presents their great financial and cultural center, all Richard and Kahlan see is a city block full of tiny shops with studio apartments built above them. Richard even asks, "This is all your great culture has achieved in 3,000 years?", while a flummoxed Owen clearly thinks that the block of two-story shacks is up there with CrystalSpiresAndTogas. As for the rest of the world, the trope is more played straight, as the ancient world had thousands of mages serving the people's needs and as they gradually died out, the idea of using technology to fill the niche they left behind hasn't quite caught on yet.



* In Creator/MikhailAkhmanov's ''[[ArrivalsFromTheDark Envoy from the Heavens]]'', Ivar Trevelian works for a human agency dedicated towards studying and advancing pre-space humanoid races. Ivar is sent to a planet that has been stuck in the Middle Ages for centuries with no drive for progress or discovery, mostly due to the political situation on the settled continent being remarkably stable. He infiltrates the society as a WanderingMinstrel and soon finds out that, for various reasons, this society frowns upon attempts to change the status quo with radical new ideas. For example, when Ivar suggests an idea for a saddle for [[CallASmeerpARabbit horses]] to a soldier to ride them instead of using chariots, the soldier looks horrified at the idea of doing this to such majestic creatures. Attempts to build steam engines often result in them exploding, which the natives use to conclude that they are bad. There is a whole undiscovered continent in the other hemisphere, but the natives believe that their world is [[FlatWorld flat]], surrounded by a ring of their head god. Attempting to reach this ring by boat may anger the god with consequences for everyone. Because of this, no one has ever attempted to sail this far. In the end, though, it turns out that [[spoiler:another alien race is deliberately causing MedievalStasis on this world, although they insist that their AlienNonInterferenceClause prevents them from doing so. Instead, they merely observe and keep humans from interfering]].

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* In Creator/MikhailAkhmanov's ''[[ArrivalsFromTheDark ''[[Literature/ArrivalsFromTheDark Envoy from the Heavens]]'', Ivar Trevelian works for a human agency dedicated towards studying and advancing pre-space humanoid races. Ivar is sent to a planet that has been stuck in the Middle Ages for centuries with no drive for progress or discovery, mostly due to the political situation on the settled continent being remarkably stable. He infiltrates the society as a WanderingMinstrel and soon finds out that, for various reasons, this society frowns upon attempts to change the status quo with radical new ideas. For example, when Ivar suggests an idea for a saddle for [[CallASmeerpARabbit horses]] to a soldier to ride them instead of using chariots, the soldier looks horrified at the idea of doing this to such majestic creatures. Attempts to build steam engines often result in them exploding, which the natives use to conclude that they are bad. There is a whole undiscovered continent in the other hemisphere, but the natives believe that their world is [[FlatWorld flat]], surrounded by a ring of their head god. Attempting to reach this ring by boat may anger the god with consequences for everyone. Because of this, no one has ever attempted to sail this far. In the end, though, it turns out that [[spoiler:another alien race is deliberately causing MedievalStasis on this world, although they insist that their AlienNonInterferenceClause prevents them from doing so. Instead, they merely observe and keep humans from interfering]].
6th Jun '16 11:42:16 AM Morgenthaler
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* Isaac Asimov's ''{{Foundation}}'' trilogy makes heavy use of MedievalStasis on the titular colony's ''enemies.'' In its early stages, the Foundation is only able to survive because its neighbors have first regressed and then fallen into an (albeit futuristic) MedievalStasis where they have forgotten most physical science (most prominently, nuclear power). The Foundation's preservation of such knowledge (via a veneer of mysticism) is what initially propels it to superpower status. Naturally, this was all planned out by Hari Seldon who manipulated events to get the Foundation to be set up on a world poor in natural resources, requiring interactions with neighbors and constant innovation in order to maximize the use of available resources. Thus, when the Foundation encounters TheRemnant of TheEmpire, the imperials can't imagine that a nuclear reactor can be anything smaller than a huge building, while the Foundation agents carry portable reactors in their pockets.

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* Isaac Asimov's ''{{Foundation}}'' ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' trilogy makes heavy use of MedievalStasis on the titular colony's ''enemies.'' In its early stages, the Foundation is only able to survive because its neighbors have first regressed and then fallen into an (albeit futuristic) MedievalStasis where they have forgotten most physical science (most prominently, nuclear power). The Foundation's preservation of such knowledge (via a veneer of mysticism) is what initially propels it to superpower status. Naturally, this was all planned out by Hari Seldon who manipulated events to get the Foundation to be set up on a world poor in natural resources, requiring interactions with neighbors and constant innovation in order to maximize the use of available resources. Thus, when the Foundation encounters TheRemnant of TheEmpire, the imperials can't imagine that a nuclear reactor can be anything smaller than a huge building, while the Foundation agents carry portable reactors in their pockets.
31st May '16 11:29:38 PM immortalfrieza
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** In some areas the Star Wars galaxy seems to have actually regressed in terms of technology over the millennia. For example, even the weakest of mass production battle droids of the KOTOR era are far more intelligent, can operate independently, possess greater tactical A.I., durable, and deadly than all but the best of the mass produced battle droids built in the prequel era despite the 4,000 year gap between them, the former even possessing energy shields on a good deal of units giving them the capacity to go up against Jedi on somewhat equal footing. In fact, even mining droids armed with just mining lasers in the KOTOR era can be somewhat effective threats to even trained soldiers just with some reprogramming to make them able to kill.
26th May '16 8:03:02 PM VortexRyder
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** Not quite: Tevinter rose 2,000 years ago from the Neromenian city states to empire/republic(Antiquity Begins), then spent 1,000 years conquering Thedas before falling(Antiquity ends, Fall of Western Roman Empire, Middle Ages Begin), the Chantry and Orlais are founded by Kordillus(Carolignian Empire, Early Middle Ages), 300 years later you have the Construction of the Grand Cathedral of Val Royeaux, the founding of the Imperial Chantry and the Exalted Marches(Byzantine Empire, Crusades), 200-400 years after that the Clayne tribes united to form Ferelden, Nevarra goes from Marcher City State to Full-blown Kingdom, Qunari land in Par Vollen(High Middle Ages, Rise of Islam,). Thedas isn't static, the same way 800 AD kingdoms aren't the same as 1400 AD kingdoms.
24th May '16 1:47:17 PM cdrood
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* In ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', Spock mistakenly concluded the Organians were this. In fact, they were SufficientlyAdvancedAliens who only assumed a humanoid form for the benefit of visitors.
** Episodes like "Return of the Archons" and "The Apple" had this enforced on the native populations by the technology of earlier, more advanced generations.
23rd May '16 6:41:09 AM PaulA
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* Creator/DavidGemmell's final Drenai novel, ''The Swords of Night and Day'' jacks an established character forward a thousand years in time in a FishOutOfTemporalWater plot. Despite some political upheaval, technology has more or less remained the exact same, with some advances in monster-making techniques being the only difference.
** Averted however in his other work, The Rignate Series. The First two books take place in times similar to the height to the Roman Empire, the next two books take place several hundred years later and combat is now based around guns and cannons with society now being similar to the 1600's.

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* Creator/DavidGemmell's final Drenai Literature/{{Drenai}} novel, ''The Swords of Night and Day'' ''Literature/TheSwordsOfNightAndDay'', jacks an established character forward a thousand years in time in a FishOutOfTemporalWater plot. Despite some political upheaval, technology has more or less remained the exact same, with some advances in monster-making techniques being the only difference.
** * Averted however in his other work, The Gemmell's Rignate Series. series. The First first two books take place in times similar to the height to the Roman Empire, the next two books take place several hundred years later and combat is now based around guns and cannons with society now being similar to the 1600's.1600s.
19th May '16 11:15:05 AM ChaoticNovelist
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MedievalStasis is a situation in which, as far as the technological, cultural, and sociopolitical level are concerned, thousands of years pass as if they were minutes.

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MedievalStasis Medieval Stasis is a situation in which, as far as the technological, cultural, and sociopolitical level are concerned, thousands of years pass as if they were minutes.



The availability of [[AppliedPhlebotinum magic]], be it of the [[FunctionalMagic controllable kind]] or [[GreenRocks otherwise]], can have a huge effect--consider the influence reliable healing magic would have on the the development of medicine[[note]]and that's not even getting into the massive cultural effects of longer lifespans, reduced infant mortality, etc.[[/note]]. Then again, past magic might have been responsible for the [[AfterTheEnd current situation]] in the first place. Besides, your average non-magical Joe would probably be all for technology, as it would end the magic user's monopoly over things like fast travel, healing, and most importantly, [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill blowing things to bits…]] assuming MagicGenetics is in place and prevents Joe from learning magic himself. It also raises questions as to why if wizards are so good they are content to let non-magic-using feudal rulers run things (unless the wizards [[TheMagocracy actually do run things]]).

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The availability of [[AppliedPhlebotinum magic]], be it of the [[FunctionalMagic controllable kind]] or [[GreenRocks [[WildMagic otherwise]], can have a huge effect--consider the influence reliable healing magic would have on the the development of medicine[[note]]and that's not even getting into the massive cultural effects of longer lifespans, reduced infant mortality, etc.[[/note]]. Then again, past magic might have been responsible for the [[AfterTheEnd current situation]] in the first place. Besides, your average non-magical Joe would probably be all for technology, as it would end the magic user's monopoly over things like fast travel, healing, and most importantly, [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill blowing things to bits…]] assuming MagicGenetics is in place and prevents Joe from learning magic himself. It also raises questions as to why if wizards are so good they are content to let non-magic-using feudal rulers run things (unless the wizards [[TheMagocracy actually do run things]]).



* In ''LightNovel/TheFamiliarOfZero'' technology is in the Middle Ages despite the current civilizations having stood for six thousand years with few major changes in ruling. One possible explanation is seen in the reaction of nobles to an internal combustion engine: It's a cute novelty, but they can do the same with magic and it'd be wasteful to make something like it for commoners.
** It doesn't help that said engine only makes a little mechanical toy snake head move instead of trying for something more practical like a horseless carriage or a motorized crane.

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* In ''LightNovel/TheFamiliarOfZero'' technology is in the Middle Ages despite the current civilizations having stood for six thousand years with few major changes in ruling. One possible explanation is seen in the reaction of nobles to an internal combustion engine: It's a cute novelty, but they can do the same with magic and it'd be wasteful to make something like it for commoners.
** It doesn't help that
commoners. Besides, said engine only makes a little mechanical toy snake head move instead of trying for something more practical like a horseless carriage or a motorized crane.



** On a metatextual level, it makes sense, given that C.S. Lewis and his literary friends (notably J.R.R. Tolkien) among TheInklings were greatly concerned about the effects of industrialization and the loss of the English countryside. This was apparently a theme in the ''Lord of the Rings'', so the fact that it's the secondary theme of ''Narnia'' isn't that surprising. Still, it is kind of jarring when you realize that Narnia starts out medieval straight off the bat and remains utterly unchanged ''until the world ends a few thousand years later.''

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** On a metatextual level, it makes sense, given that C.S. Lewis and his literary friends (notably (such as J.R.R. Tolkien) among TheInklings were greatly concerned about the effects of industrialization and the loss of the English countryside. This was apparently a theme in the ''Lord of the Rings'', so the fact that it's the secondary theme of ''Narnia'' isn't that surprising. Still, it is kind of jarring when you realize that Narnia starts out medieval straight off the bat and remains utterly unchanged ''until the world ends a few thousand years later.''



* The ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series is a case of medieval stasis enabled by the use of FunctionalMagic to supply many of the conveniences that would otherwise be provided by technology. However, three thousand years with no notable scientific advancement is a bit much, and a very subtle (i.e., blink and you'll miss it) justification is provided in that the PowersThatBe have been carefully orchestrating history in order to set the stage to avert the [[CataclysmBackstory return]] of a WorldSundering magical [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt Cataclysm]]. As this imperative wanes, it can be seen in the ''Mage Storms'' trilogy that Valdemar, by far the most progressive nation from a cultural standpoint, has begun to support a cadre of artificers who are rapidly moving toward late Renaissance and even steam technology. However, nobody's figured out gunpowder or anything resembling (non-magical) explosives.\\\

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* The ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series is a case of medieval stasis enabled by the use of FunctionalMagic to supply many of the conveniences that would otherwise be provided by technology. However, three thousand years with no notable scientific advancement is a bit much, and a very subtle (i.e., blink and you'll miss it) justification is provided in that the PowersThatBe have been carefully orchestrating history in order to set the stage to avert the [[CataclysmBackstory return]] of a WorldSundering magical [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt Cataclysm]]. As this imperative wanes, it can be seen in the ''Mage Storms'' trilogy that Valdemar, by far the most progressive nation from a cultural standpoint, has begun to support a cadre of artificers who are rapidly moving toward late Renaissance and even steam technology. However, nobody's figured out gunpowder or anything resembling (non-magical) explosives.\\\



* Creator/DavidGemmell's final Drenai novel, ''The Swords of Night and Day'' jacks an established character forward a thousand years in time in a FishOutOfTemporalWater plot. Despite some political upheaval, technology has more or less remained the exact same, with some advances in monster-making techniques being the only notable difference.

to:

* Creator/DavidGemmell's final Drenai novel, ''The Swords of Night and Day'' jacks an established character forward a thousand years in time in a FishOutOfTemporalWater plot. Despite some political upheaval, technology has more or less remained the exact same, with some advances in monster-making techniques being the only notable difference.



* The ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' setting generally falls under this, with a few notable exceptions. Countries come and go, several fallen kingdoms/empires may have been built on the same spot, and politics has dramatically changed. To the extent there's enough ancient-to-modern history to have a [[{{Sourcebook}} splatbook]] (''Lost Empires of Faerun'') devoted to it. And while swords-and-bow technology hasn't changed all that much, humans have advanced out of the Bronze Age and into the Iron Age, new spells and fighting styles are constantly being developed, and one church (Gond) has the invention and development of technology as one of its primary goals, thus leading to things like the printing press and the [[{{Magitek}} alchemy]] equivalent of gunpowder.

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* The ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' setting generally falls under this, with a few notable exceptions. Countries come and go, several fallen kingdoms/empires may have been built on the same spot, and politics has dramatically changed. To the extent there's enough ancient-to-modern history to have a [[{{Sourcebook}} splatbook]] (''Lost Empires of Faerun'') devoted to it. And while swords-and-bow technology hasn't changed all that much, humans have advanced out of the Bronze Age and into the Iron Age, new spells and fighting styles are constantly being developed, and one church (Gond) has the invention and development of technology as one of its primary goals, thus leading to things like the printing press and the [[{{Magitek}} alchemy]] equivalent of gunpowder.



* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender''. In the flashbacks of Aang's three previous lives, which seems to span somewhere on the order of three or four hundred years, most of the world seems to have changed very little (Aang's outdated knowledge of slang aside). Even the Fire Nation, the setting's sole industrialized country, isn't completely immune; its ironclad steamships seen during the bulk of the series are virtually indistinquishable from the ones seen in flashbacks taking place ''one hundred years ago''.
** We do see some technological innovation over the course of the war (and the art book states that Zuko's own ship is actually quite old compared with the current Fire Nation standard), but the overall developmental pace over those hundred years still seems quite slow considering that the Fire Nation already had a 19th-century {{Steampunk}} level of technology; you'd expect the war to have accelerated the technological development of it and its opponents. Heck, even the innovations we do see were mostly created by just one inventor towards the end of the war.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender''. In ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' [[PlayingWithATrope plays around with this trope in many ways.]]
**In
the flashbacks of Aang's three previous lives, which seems to span somewhere on the order of three or four hundred years, most of the world seems to have changed very little (Aang's outdated knowledge of slang aside). Even the Fire Nation, the setting's sole industrialized country, isn't completely immune; its ironclad steamships seen during the bulk of the series are virtually indistinquishable from the ones seen in flashbacks taking place ''one hundred years ago''.
** We do see some technological innovation over the course of the war (and the art book states that Zuko's own ship is actually quite old compared with the current Fire Nation standard), but the overall developmental pace over those hundred years still seems quite slow considering that the Fire Nation already had a 19th-century {{Steampunk}} level of technology; you'd expect the war to have accelerated the technological development of it and its opponents. Heck, even the innovations we do see were mostly created by just one inventor towards the end of the war.



* Averted in its SequelSeries ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'', which takes place in the setting's equivalent of TheRoaringTwenties. Not only has the entire world basically gone through the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Industrial_Revolution Second Industrial Revolution]] (in the seventy years that separate the series), but cars and radios have become quite common (though the cars themselves seem to have been the same ModelT-inspired things for fifty years), and the first airplanes and films are already in production. [[spoiler: Heck, they're even beyond ''us'' at this point, with fully functional MiniMecha!]]
** Going in the other direction, the flashbacks to Avatar Wan's time 10,000 years ago show a world that is clearly different from the world in both Aang's and Korra's time, but less different than would be expected for a 10,000 year gap.
** Notably, ''Korra'' subverts the trope not only in terms of simple technology, but it also goes to great lengths to show cultural change. Most notably, [[spoiler:the reformed Air Nation, being formed from people from several different nations who joined at various ages, are shown as being far less monastic than their Air Nomad predecessors, and much more active in world affairs. Also, head-shaving is far less common, and modern Airbenders have replaced their traditional clothes with wingsuits developed by Future Industries.]]

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* Averted in its SequelSeries ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'', which takes place in the setting's equivalent of TheRoaringTwenties. Not only has the entire world basically gone through the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Industrial_Revolution Second Industrial Revolution]] (in the seventy years that separate the series), but cars and radios have become quite common (though the cars themselves seem to have been the same ModelT-inspired things for fifty years), and the first airplanes and films are already in production. [[spoiler: Heck, they're even beyond ''us'' ''real life'' at this point, with fully functional MiniMecha!]]
** Going in the other direction, the The flashbacks to Avatar Wan's time 10,000 years ago show a world that is clearly different from the world in both Aang's and Korra's time, but less different than would be expected for a 10,000 year gap.
** Notably, ''Korra'' subverts averts the trope not only in terms of simple technology, but it also goes to great lengths to show cultural change. Most notably, [[spoiler:the [[spoiler:The reformed Air Nation, being formed from people from several different nations who joined at various ages, are shown as being far less monastic than their Air Nomad predecessors, and much more active in world affairs. Also, head-shaving is far less common, and modern Airbenders have replaced their traditional clothes with wingsuits developed by Future Industries.]]



** By the time Commodore Perry arrived off what is now Tokyo Bay in 1853 however, there were at least a handful of notable changes from the days of Tokugawa Ieyasu. The Samurai in general had long turned into a landed peacetime caste, though their place in society was gradually being challenged by the merchant classes. With the exception of fringe and particularly stubborn clans, most were either allied to or puppets of the Shogunate. A fair bit of knowledge of the outside world filtered through the Ryukyus, Tsushima, and the isle of Dejima (modern medicine and science being called "Dutch studies/learning", acquired as it was from contact with the Dutch trading post confined to Dejima Island in Nagasaki). This meant that while the Japanese didn't have the technology that showed up on their doorstep (i.e. the "Black Ships"), they knew ''enough'' for the better-informed among them to figure out just how far behind they were falling in the seventeenth and eighteenth century.

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** By the time Commodore Perry arrived off what is now Tokyo Bay in 1853 however, there were at least a handful of notable changes from the days of Tokugawa Ieyasu. The Samurai in general had long turned into a landed peacetime caste, though their place in society was gradually being challenged by the merchant classes. With the exception of fringe and particularly stubborn clans, most were either allied to or puppets of the Shogunate. A fair bit of knowledge of the outside world filtered through the Ryukyus, Tsushima, and the isle of Dejima (modern medicine and science being called "Dutch studies/learning", acquired as it was from contact with the Dutch trading post confined to Dejima Island in Nagasaki). This meant that while the Japanese didn't have the technology that showed up on their doorstep (i.e. the "Black Ships"), they knew ''enough'' for the better-informed among them to figure out just how far behind they were falling in the seventeenth and eighteenth century.
5th May '16 11:05:23 PM Ramidel
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* ''{{GURPS}} TabletopGame/{{Banestorm}}'''s world of Yrth has been kept at a Late Medieval level of technology and society, in part due to the Megalan Empire's Ministry of Serendipity, a secret police charged with hunting down inventors, technologies and other ideas which threaten the status quo. The other nations of Yrth appear to have similar organisations.

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* ''{{GURPS}} TabletopGame/{{Banestorm}}'''s world of Yrth has been kept at a Late Medieval level of technology and society, in part due to the Megalan Empire's Ministry of Serendipity, a secret police charged with hunting down inventors, technologies and other ideas which threaten the status quo. The other nations of Yrth appear to have similar organisations. In all cases, this is because mages worldwide are in favor of maintaining stasis to protect their position.
2nd May '16 8:48:13 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** From what little is known about them, the Eastern Empire of Cathay developed iron armor and gunpowder weapons before Nagash was born in the local bronze age... and then still had exactly the same technology base more than 3000 years later.
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