History Main / MedievalStasis

16th Apr '16 12:03:39 PM Unknownlight
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* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic''. While the actual tech-level of the present-day [[SchizoTech seems to be all over the place]], it is clearly more advanced than what it was like back when the pony tribes were still separated and on bad terms, roughly around a thousand years ago. Progress may be slow, but it's happening.
12th Apr '16 9:58:41 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* The Asgardians from ''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'' are an interesting case. They are a society caught in medieval stasis that is advanced far beyond medieval times. They are shown using the same weapons (swords, shields, and spears), technology, and armor 5,000+ years ago as they do in modern times. Horses are a common form of transportation. Yet they can harvest material from stars, have flying machines, and travel between worlds through wormholes. Implied to be a combination of their extremely long lives, emphasis on close combat, use of magic, and being at the top of the food chain so long and eliminated all of society's ills that they have no reason to change.

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* The Asgardians from ''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'' are an interesting case. They are a society caught in medieval stasis that is advanced far beyond medieval times. They are shown using the same weapons (swords, shields, and spears), technology, and armor 5,000+ years ago as they do in modern times. Horses are a common form of transportation. Yet they can harvest material from stars, have flying machines, and travel between worlds through wormholes. Implied to be a combination of their extremely long lives, emphasis on close combat, use of magic, and being at the top of the food chain so long and eliminated all of society's ills that they have no reason to change. It's also intentionally vague how much of this is just aesthetics; their spaceships are made to look like longships while their armor and shields incorporate force fields. More advanced technology that kept with the theme would be visually indistinguishable.
11th Apr '16 11:59:50 AM Morgenthaler
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* Steven Erikson's ''MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' is an extreme example: The world has a history stretching back three hundred thousand (300,000) years and more, yet technology is still medieval (except for the existence of dynamite-like munitions). Lampshaded and justified by Samar Dev in ''The Bonehunters'': She noted (lamented, really) that the power of The Warrens means will never really have a need to strive for technological solutions to their problems. If they can't magic it, they'll just buy or trade for what they need from another race.

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* Steven Erikson's ''MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' is an extreme example: The world has a history stretching back three hundred thousand (300,000) years and more, yet technology is still medieval (except for the existence of dynamite-like munitions). Lampshaded and justified by Samar Dev in ''The Bonehunters'': She noted (lamented, really) that the power of The Warrens means will never really have a need to strive for technological solutions to their problems. If they can't magic it, they'll just buy or trade for what they need from another race.
19th Mar '16 9:35:53 AM thatother1dude
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* The Crystal Gems from ''WesternAnimation/{{StevenUniverse}}'' technology has been like this since the rebellion of 5000 years ago, compare this to Homeworld, whose technology is MUCH more advanced.
18th Mar '16 1:02:43 PM jedijackkenobi88
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Added DiffLines:

** The most prominent examples are Endor and Dathomir, which compared the rest of the galaxy fits this trope.
18th Mar '16 1:00:25 PM jedijackkenobi88
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Added DiffLines:

* The Crystal Gems from ''WesternAnimation/{{StevenUniverse}}'' technology has been like this since the rebellion of 5000 years ago, compare this to Homeworld, whose technology is MUCH more advanced.
17th Mar '16 4:31:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* An interesting variant appears in ''Series/StargateSG1'', in which the Goa'uld are shown in ancient Egypt sequences as using the same technology as they do in the regular episodes. In the time that humans went from simple bows to nuclear missiles, the Goa'uld haven't added trigger guards to their guns. This is justified by Goa'uld culture being antithetical to good scientific practice (although Goa'uld scientists like Nirrti and Nerus do exist), and all their technology being stolen anyway, but to be this extreme, they need to be quite the PlanetOfHats. It's shown a few times that some isolated worlds, free from Goa'uld control, had actually advanced ''further'' technologically than humans on Earth.
** While some worlds have advanced farther and made changes to their culture, many more seem to be trapped in stasis, their society, culture, and technology having advanced no further than the day they were transplanted to that world, despite centuries or even millenia having passed.
** Similar to below, the advanced human race Aschen reduce the fertility of less advanced races under the pretence of bringing medical technology. The Aschen then create farmworlds on top of other races' civilization, keeping the descendants of the original inhabitants as uneducated farmhands.
* In ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', the Wraith systematically destroy any society advanced enough to pose a threat to them, meaning the most likely type of society will be of medieval level, or lower.This has the disadvantage of lower cullings in each planet each time they revisist since a lower technology level means higher child mortality as well as lower populations as people dont live long enough and the population doesnt reach to high.The Wraith Queen in the pilot is even suprised that Earths population is in "the billions". Subverting this is the Genii, who ''pretend'' to be at an agrarian level of development, but it's all just a ruse to keep the Wraith away from their secret underground facilities, which are about… somewhere between the 1940s and the 1960s.

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* An interesting variant appears in ''Series/StargateSG1'', in which the ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** The
Goa'uld are shown in ancient Egypt sequences as using the same technology as they do in the regular episodes. In the time that humans went from simple bows to nuclear missiles, the Goa'uld haven't added trigger guards to their guns. This is justified by Goa'uld culture being antithetical to good scientific practice (although Goa'uld scientists like Nirrti and Nerus do exist), and all their technology being stolen anyway, but to be this extreme, they need to be quite the PlanetOfHats. It's shown a few times that some isolated worlds, free from Goa'uld control, had actually advanced ''further'' technologically than humans on Earth.
** While some worlds have advanced farther and made changes to their culture, many more seem to be trapped in stasis, their society, culture, and technology having advanced no further than the day they were transplanted to that world, despite centuries or even millenia having passed.
** Similar to below, the
The advanced human race Aschen reduce the fertility of less advanced races under the pretence of bringing medical technology. The Aschen then create farmworlds on top of other races' civilization, keeping the descendants of the original inhabitants as uneducated farmhands.
* In ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', the ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** The
Wraith systematically destroy any society advanced enough to pose a threat to them, meaning the most likely type of society will be of medieval level, or lower.This has the disadvantage of lower cullings in each planet each time they revisist since a lower technology level means higher child mortality as well as lower populations as people dont live long enough and the population doesnt reach to high.The Wraith Queen in the pilot is even suprised that Earths population is in "the billions". Subverting this is the Genii, who ''pretend'' to be at an agrarian level of development, but it's all just a ruse to keep the Wraith away from their secret underground facilities, which are about… somewhere between the 1940s and the 1960s.



* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Up the Long Ladder" The Enterprise rescues a group of SpaceAmish who have lived as they have for 200 years, even keeping their Irish accents. In the same episode they come across the other, technological, group from the same original colonists of whom only five survived landing and they have been breeding through advanced cloning for 200 years--but evidently keeping their stasis so as not to develop space travel to go back and get more humans for their genetic pool.

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
**
In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Up the Long Ladder" The Enterprise rescues a group of SpaceAmish who have lived as they have for 200 years, even keeping their Irish accents. In the same episode they come across the other, technological, group from the same original colonists of whom only five survived landing and they have been breeding through advanced cloning for 200 years--but evidently keeping their stasis so as not to develop space travel to go back and get more humans for their genetic pool.
8th Mar '16 1:05:59 PM Eievie
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So, you have a HeroicFantasy with a ''long'' history in order to account for the fact that the SealedEvilInACan has been forgotten. You fast forward about five thousand years and reveal a world... exactly like the one you started in! Same kinds of tools and devices, same form of government, same language, same culture -- you wouldn't even need to dress differently to fit right in.

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So, you have a HeroicFantasy with a ''long'' history in order to account for the fact that the SealedEvilInACan has been forgotten. You fast forward about five thousand years and reveal a world... world… exactly like the one you started in! Same kinds of tools and devices, same form of government, same language, same culture -- you culture--you wouldn't even need to dress differently to fit right in.



Furthermore, there have been no wars -- between countries or civil wars -- no redrawing of any inter-state boundaries. No new nations have arisen, and none have been subsumed into others or wiped out. No more or less land is under the plough[[note]] This is one area in which things most consistently changed over time throughout the last three thousand years of Eurasian (but not so much American or Australian, prior to European settlement) history, though there have been reverses. Population kept rising with it, of course[[/note]], no canals have been dug or allowed to silt up and no rivers have changed course or been made (un)navigable[[note]] Even today, 90% of the bulk/weight of world-trade entails shipping. Even today there is still no way to cheaply ship bulky items over long distances other than, well, ''shipping'' them. More cargo, both bulk and containers, is hauled on European big rivers annually than on European roads and railroads combined. Profit margins dwindled fast after the first 30km (one day's cart-travel) from the nearest shoreline, river, or canal[[/note]], and it certainly doesn't ''look'' like people have been making and accumulating things like brick and iron in the intervening time[[note]] The amount of both of these in use has steadily increased over time as well. Once it's been quarried there's no reason why stone can't be used time and again, e.g. the near-complete salvaging of the stone sections of The Great Wall Of China for use in people's houses (it's had to be rebuilt a few times from scratch for just this reason). In the same vein iron was just too useful not to be well-used and looked-after and and salvaged and accumulated. Knowledge and writings (scrolls, books, etc), too, have steadily accumulated over time. Most of it isn't remotely useful, of course, but it's still nice to have. Exceptions to the Rule Of Accumulation abound, such as iron-poor Japan - the islands had so little iron that it was profitable to import it from Korea and China, and every single piece of iron armour was painstakingly coated in lacquer to prevent even the slightest bit of it from being lost to rusting [[/note]]. There have been no demographic changes (both population increase and the subsequent inevitable decrease[[note]] The soil can only support so many people. All it takes is one bad harvest and a nasty cold going around, and ''bam''. Demographic decline. Then, sooner or later, the cycle starts all over again... [[/note]] have caused major changes), no changes of religion or religious observance[[note]] Europe's Medieval period saw two - increasingly religious through the late dark ages as Pagan Europe was conquered or converted, increasingly secular until the 14th Century or so, then increasingly religious once more until the end of the 15th century reached the old high of general religiousness [[/note]], no changes of dynasty, no new organizations of political or social significance (such as guilds), no changes in in art or music or clothing, no new fashions, and no changes in academic or philosophical studies. Despite the apparent age of uninterrupted peace, there will still be a professional warrior caste standing - with undiminished wealth and status despite their redundancy - for the entire period. If the landscape changes at all, even in the course of 100,000 years, it won't be due to geological processes, but due to [[WorldSundering magic]]. Otherwise, expect the landmarks and geography to remain identical across the eons.

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Furthermore, there have been no wars -- between wars--between countries or civil wars -- no wars--no redrawing of any inter-state boundaries. No new nations have arisen, and none have been subsumed into others or wiped out. No more or less land is under the plough[[note]] This is one area in which things most consistently changed over time throughout the last three thousand years of Eurasian (but not so much American or Australian, prior to European settlement) history, though there have been reverses. Population kept rising with it, of course[[/note]], no canals have been dug or allowed to silt up and no rivers have changed course or been made (un)navigable[[note]] Even today, 90% of the bulk/weight of world-trade entails shipping. Even today there is still no way to cheaply ship bulky items over long distances other than, well, ''shipping'' them. More cargo, both bulk and containers, is hauled on European big rivers annually than on European roads and railroads combined. Profit margins dwindled fast after the first 30km (one day's cart-travel) from the nearest shoreline, river, or canal[[/note]], and it certainly doesn't ''look'' like people have been making and accumulating things like brick and iron in the intervening time[[note]] The amount of both of these in use has steadily increased over time as well. Once it's been quarried there's no reason why stone can't be used time and again, e.g. the near-complete salvaging of the stone sections of The Great Wall Of China for use in people's houses (it's had to be rebuilt a few times from scratch for just this reason). In the same vein iron was just too useful not to be well-used and looked-after and and salvaged and accumulated. Knowledge and writings (scrolls, books, etc), too, have steadily accumulated over time. Most of it isn't remotely useful, of course, but it's still nice to have. Exceptions to the Rule Of Accumulation abound, such as iron-poor Japan - the Japan--the islands had so little iron that it was profitable to import it from Korea and China, and every single piece of iron armour was painstakingly coated in lacquer to prevent even the slightest bit of it from being lost to rusting [[/note]]. There have been no demographic changes (both population increase and the subsequent inevitable decrease[[note]] The soil can only support so many people. All it takes is one bad harvest and a nasty cold going around, and ''bam''. Demographic decline. Then, sooner or later, the cycle starts all over again... again… [[/note]] have caused major changes), no changes of religion or religious observance[[note]] Europe's Medieval period saw two - increasingly two--increasingly religious through the late dark ages as Pagan Europe was conquered or converted, increasingly secular until the 14th Century or so, then increasingly religious once more until the end of the 15th century reached the old high of general religiousness [[/note]], no changes of dynasty, no new organizations of political or social significance (such as guilds), no changes in in art or music or clothing, no new fashions, and no changes in academic or philosophical studies. Despite the apparent age of uninterrupted peace, there will still be a professional warrior caste standing - with standing--with undiminished wealth and status despite their redundancy - for redundancy--for the entire period. If the landscape changes at all, even in the course of 100,000 years, it won't be due to geological processes, but due to [[WorldSundering magic]]. Otherwise, expect the landmarks and geography to remain identical across the eons.



The availability of [[AppliedPhlebotinum magic]], be it of the [[FunctionalMagic controllable kind]] or [[GreenRocks otherwise]], can have a huge effect -- consider the influence reliable healing magic would have on the the development of medicine[[note]]and that's not even getting into the massive cultural effects of longer lifespans, reduced infant mortality, etc.[[/note]]. Then again, past magic might have been responsible for the [[AfterTheEnd current situation]] in the first place. Besides, your average non-magical Joe would probably be all for technology, as it would end the magic user's monopoly over things like fast travel, healing, and most importantly, [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill blowing things to bits]]... assuming MagicGenetics is in place and prevents Joe from learning magic himself. It also raises questions as to why if wizards are so good they are content to let non-magic-using feudal rulers run things (unless the wizards [[TheMagocracy actually do run things]]).

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The availability of [[AppliedPhlebotinum magic]], be it of the [[FunctionalMagic controllable kind]] or [[GreenRocks otherwise]], can have a huge effect -- consider effect--consider the influence reliable healing magic would have on the the development of medicine[[note]]and that's not even getting into the massive cultural effects of longer lifespans, reduced infant mortality, etc.[[/note]]. Then again, past magic might have been responsible for the [[AfterTheEnd current situation]] in the first place. Besides, your average non-magical Joe would probably be all for technology, as it would end the magic user's monopoly over things like fast travel, healing, and most importantly, [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill blowing things to bits]]... bits…]] assuming MagicGenetics is in place and prevents Joe from learning magic himself. It also raises questions as to why if wizards are so good they are content to let non-magic-using feudal rulers run things (unless the wizards [[TheMagocracy actually do run things]]).



May feature in a FeudalFuture -- even if the technology is [[SpaceAgeStasis far advanced]]. Compare ModernStasis. A related trope is SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale, which is this trope applied to distances rather than time. Also compare to MugglesDoItBetter, where in settings that separate the supernatural and the mundane world, the supernatural is locked in a medieval stasis while the mundane continues to advance. If parts of the world are stuck in Medieval Stasis and others have jetpacks, see SchizoTech.

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May feature in a FeudalFuture -- even FeudalFuture--even if the technology is [[SpaceAgeStasis far advanced]]. Compare ModernStasis. A related trope is SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale, which is this trope applied to distances rather than time. Also compare to MugglesDoItBetter, where in settings that separate the supernatural and the mundane world, the supernatural is locked in a medieval stasis while the mundane continues to advance. If parts of the world are stuck in Medieval Stasis and others have jetpacks, see SchizoTech.



Rakushun also credits refugees from Earth with introducing paper, print and ceramics (presumably an advanced * type* of ceramics, like porcelain?). They use Chinese characters and social structures. Presumably the gods ran off 12 copies of classical China for reasons of their own. Their technology might be 'stagnating' at the level of late China, no steam (but no coal) or electricity (if that even works), but good mechanisms... the fact that many kingdoms get major disasters every 50 years or so when the king dies won't help.

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Rakushun also credits refugees from Earth with introducing paper, print and ceramics (presumably an advanced * type* ''type'' of ceramics, like porcelain?). They use Chinese characters and social structures. Presumably the gods ran off 12 copies of classical China for reasons of their own. Their technology might be 'stagnating' at the level of late China, no steam (but no coal) or electricity (if that even works), but good mechanisms... mechanisms… the fact that many kingdoms get major disasters every 50 years or so when the king dies won't help.



* ''ComicBook/ThievesAndKings'' has this without explanation - there have been (many, many) wars, mind, but one character moved from centuries in the past to join the main characters and no-one even comments on her accent.

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* ''ComicBook/ThievesAndKings'' has this without explanation - there explanation--there have been (many, many) wars, mind, but one character moved from centuries in the past to join the main characters and no-one even comments on her accent.



* Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth (''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', etc). Generally speaking, over thousands of years, the basic technology appears to be the same - for the most part. However, everything was grander and more magical in the First Age, and the Elves are fading away as of the Third Age. They are in their "autumn, never to be followed by another spring". The ages of the world tend to end with {{eucatastrophe}}, meaning any technological advances were lost to Middle-earth between ages. Either the technology itself was lost to all knowledge or the Elves took it away with them as they left Middle-Earth. Still, while technology, armor and weapons in particular, is generally described in the same terms over the ages, there are indications of advances, though they are usually unique to certain cultures and simply don't become widespread as in the modern world.

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* Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth (''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', etc). Generally speaking, over thousands of years, the basic technology appears to be the same - for same--for the most part. However, everything was grander and more magical in the First Age, and the Elves are fading away as of the Third Age. They are in their "autumn, never to be followed by another spring". The ages of the world tend to end with {{eucatastrophe}}, meaning any technological advances were lost to Middle-earth between ages. Either the technology itself was lost to all knowledge or the Elves took it away with them as they left Middle-Earth. Still, while technology, armor and weapons in particular, is generally described in the same terms over the ages, there are indications of advances, though they are usually unique to certain cultures and simply don't become widespread as in the modern world.



* The Literature/{{Discworld}} is generally an exception to this trope -- you can see technology and culture changing from year to year -- but it was a plot point in ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'', where the kingdom of Djelibeybi is caught in this state, thanks to a time loop generated by an oversupply of pyramid power. Having said that, the TV adaptation of ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' included a {{flashback}} to Alberto Malich's childhood, two thousand years ago... using the same vaguely Georgian costumes and streets as in the main story. (Although to be fair, it's not actually ''stated'' that Albert's 2,000 years old in the TV version.)
** It has also been mentioned (especially in the ''Science of Discworld'' series) that a world where many tropes (such as the RuleOfFunny) are fundamental laws does not lend itself to technological advances - things are simply too unpredictable.

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* The Literature/{{Discworld}} is generally an exception to this trope -- you trope--you can see technology and culture changing from year to year -- but year--but it was a plot point in ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'', where the kingdom of Djelibeybi is caught in this state, thanks to a time loop generated by an oversupply of pyramid power. Having said that, the TV adaptation of ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' included a {{flashback}} to Alberto Malich's childhood, two thousand years ago... using the same vaguely Georgian costumes and streets as in the main story. (Although to be fair, it's not actually ''stated'' that Albert's 2,000 years old in the TV version.)
** It has also been mentioned (especially in the ''Science of Discworld'' series) that a world where many tropes (such as the RuleOfFunny) are fundamental laws does not lend itself to technological advances - things advances--things are simply too unpredictable.



** The general temperment of some of the Disc leaders also leads to stagnation. [[spoiler:Goldeneyes Silverhand Dactylos made a metal golem army for the Tomb of Pitchiu; it cost him his eyes. He made new ones of gold and relearned his craft, making the fantastic Palace of the Seven Deserts for the Emir; it cost him his right hand. He made a new one of silver and built the first of the great [[ItMakesSenseinContext Light Dams]] for the tribal councils of the Great Nef; they hamstrung him. All to keep him from sharing secrets or doing anything as great for anyone else. Finally, Dactylos came to Krull, creating a great fish-ship for them and asking only not to be mutilated in return. The Arch-astronomer agreed -but had him killed. Not a history to encourage other innovators.]]

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** The general temperment of some of the Disc leaders also leads to stagnation. [[spoiler:Goldeneyes Silverhand Dactylos made a metal golem army for the Tomb of Pitchiu; it cost him his eyes. He made new ones of gold and relearned his craft, making the fantastic Palace of the Seven Deserts for the Emir; it cost him his right hand. He made a new one of silver and built the first of the great [[ItMakesSenseinContext Light Dams]] for the tribal councils of the Great Nef; they hamstrung him. All to keep him from sharing secrets or doing anything as great for anyone else. Finally, Dactylos came to Krull, creating a great fish-ship for them and asking only not to be mutilated in return. The Arch-astronomer agreed -but agreed--but had him killed. Not a history to encourage other innovators.]]



** An additional reason is that most human empires in the Malazan world are very short-lived and humanity is thrown back culturally and technologically regularly over the millennia, due to violent upheavals. The one empire that did survive since the fall of the First Empire, Lether, has magical reasons for being put in a - literal - stasis.

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** An additional reason is that most human empires in the Malazan world are very short-lived and humanity is thrown back culturally and technologically regularly over the millennia, due to violent upheavals. The one empire that did survive since the fall of the First Empire, Lether, has magical reasons for being put in a - literal - stasis.a--literal--stasis.



* Both justified and averted in L.E. Modesitt's ''Literature/TheSagaOfRecluce'' series. Although some technological progress is made, the eponymous island's government suppresses the knowledge in a mistaken belief in StatusQuoIsGod, and keeps things under control within its sphere of influence. However, the BigBad empire on the other side of the world has been busy inventing....

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* Both justified and averted in L.E. Modesitt's ''Literature/TheSagaOfRecluce'' series. Although some technological progress is made, the eponymous island's government suppresses the knowledge in a mistaken belief in StatusQuoIsGod, and keeps things under control within its sphere of influence. However, the BigBad empire on the other side of the world has been busy inventing....inventing…



* Justified in Creator/DavidWeber's novel ''Literature/{{Safehold}}''. The last human colony has been in MedievalStasis for eight hundred years, thanks to a religion ''designed'' to prevent the re-emergence of technology (not to mention an orbital kinetic weapons platform programmed to smack any location with evidence of advanced tech like electrical power), so that the colony isn't found and destroyed by aliens. However, cracks have begun to emerge -- water power and gunpowder have been invented. Note that eight hundred years is a period of time not far out of line with how long the ''real'' medieval period lasted, and the goal of the protagonist is explicitly to break the MedievalStasis and restore the advanced technology.

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* Justified in Creator/DavidWeber's novel ''Literature/{{Safehold}}''. The last human colony has been in MedievalStasis for eight hundred years, thanks to a religion ''designed'' to prevent the re-emergence of technology (not to mention an orbital kinetic weapons platform programmed to smack any location with evidence of advanced tech like electrical power), so that the colony isn't found and destroyed by aliens. However, cracks have begun to emerge -- water emerge--water power and gunpowder have been invented. Note that eight hundred years is a period of time not far out of line with how long the ''real'' medieval period lasted, and the goal of the protagonist is explicitly to break the MedievalStasis and restore the advanced technology.



* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''[[Literature/KnownSpace Kzinti]]'' histories. The Kzin aren't terribly intelligent to begin with, and gained the great majority of their technology by [[spoiler:rising up against their Jotok masters and offing most of them]], and in a universe without FTL technology, it takes a LONG time for things to propagate over several hundred light-years of empire. Imperial standardization as well as simple physics kept the Kzin at a very, very, painfully minuscule level of advancement. The Kzin even have a priestlike caste called the Conservers Of The Ancient Past, whose job is to prevent unneeded change. Though after the first couple wars with humanity they become much more motivated to advance, even acquiring hyperdrive shortly after Earth does.

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* In Creator/LarryNiven's ''[[Literature/KnownSpace Kzinti]]'' histories. The Kzin aren't terribly intelligent to begin with, and gained the great majority of their technology by [[spoiler:rising up against their Jotok masters and offing most of them]], and in a universe without FTL technology, it takes a LONG ''long'' time for things to propagate over several hundred light-years of empire. Imperial standardization as well as simple physics kept the Kzin at a very, very, painfully minuscule level of advancement. The Kzin even have a priestlike caste called the Conservers Of The Ancient Past, whose job is to prevent unneeded change. Though after the first couple wars with humanity they become much more motivated to advance, even acquiring hyperdrive shortly after Earth does.



** The colonists were ''deliberately'' looking to build a largely non-industrial society - plus, the "resources negligible" status possibly means that the planet doesn't offer the means to do so if they wanted to. Thread just accelerated the process and pushed it a little further along than the colonists intended.

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** The colonists were ''deliberately'' looking to build a largely non-industrial society - plus, society--plus, the "resources negligible" status possibly means that the planet doesn't offer the means to do so if they wanted to. Thread just accelerated the process and pushed it a little further along than the colonists intended.



** The ''Literature/BookOfTheNewSun'' tetrology of novels take place a ''looong'' way in the future (the techno-fantasy "post-historical" era where Stone-Age Man, the Modern Era, and the Galaxy-Spanning Imperial Era are all lumped together as the "Age of Myth"). The world is roughly at medieval levels (even though [[AnachronismStew fragments of other tech levels are scattered about]]) and has been for perhaps a million years. It is implied in the books that this was done ''deliberately'' - time travel had become a common technology at one point, so accurate record-keeping was abolished and cultural stasis enforced to prevent time-travelers from targeting historically-important points.\\

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** The ''Literature/BookOfTheNewSun'' tetrology of novels take place a ''looong'' way in the future (the techno-fantasy "post-historical" era where Stone-Age Man, the Modern Era, and the Galaxy-Spanning Imperial Era are all lumped together as the "Age of Myth"). The world is roughly at medieval levels (even though [[AnachronismStew fragments of other tech levels are scattered about]]) and has been for perhaps a million years. It is implied in the books that this was done ''deliberately'' - time ''deliberately''--time travel had become a common technology at one point, so accurate record-keeping was abolished and cultural stasis enforced to prevent time-travelers from targeting historically-important points.\\



* ''Literature/TalesOfTheFiveHundredKingdoms'' seems to be in a stasis of sorts - but it's heavily implied that this is due to The Tradition, which ''really'' likes things to stay the same. Sometimes, this can be a problem, since The Tradition also likes to fit things into tidy little stories...and it doesn't especially care if the story has a happy ending or not.
* Subverted in ''Literature/DarkLordOfDerkholm'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones - the world just pretends to be constantly medieval so as to live up to expectations.

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* ''Literature/TalesOfTheFiveHundredKingdoms'' seems to be in a stasis of sorts - but sorts--but it's heavily implied that this is due to The Tradition, which ''really'' likes things to stay the same. Sometimes, this can be a problem, since The Tradition also likes to fit things into tidy little stories... and it doesn't especially care if the story has a happy ending or not.
* Subverted in ''Literature/DarkLordOfDerkholm'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones - the Creator/DianaWynneJones--the world just pretends to be constantly medieval so as to live up to expectations.



* This is a common complaint/question about ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia''. Without even worrying about, say, the decades between ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' and ''The Silver Chair'' -- a ''thousand'' years pass between ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'' and ''Prince Caspian'', and seven generations between ''The Silver Chair'' and ''The Last Battle''. Technological achievement consists of one channel dug at Cair Paravel and one bridge built at Beruna. (Of course, this is one of those aggressively nostalgic cases where development is actively opposed by the protagonists and anyone who tries it gets put down in a hurry. Caspian actually says as much in ''Dawn Treader'' -- the issue is slavery, but they're talking in general terms. Even the author/narrator, when he's writing about our world, is always dropping in things like how sweets used to be cheaper and kids don't know to swear on the Bible anymore, and Eustace's liberal, modern upbringing is described basically as code to show that he's going to be an unsympathetic jerk. There are also a couple of technological anachronisms in Narnia, like Mrs. Beaver's sewing machine, to combine the medieval and twentieth-century nostalgia. Sewing machines good, Plumptree's Vitaminized Nerve Food bad.)

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* This is a common complaint/question about ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia''. Without even worrying about, say, the decades between ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' and ''The Silver Chair'' -- a Chair''--a ''thousand'' years pass between ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'' and ''Prince Caspian'', and seven generations between ''The Silver Chair'' and ''The Last Battle''. Technological achievement consists of one channel dug at Cair Paravel and one bridge built at Beruna. (Of course, this is one of those aggressively nostalgic cases where development is actively opposed by the protagonists and anyone who tries it gets put down in a hurry. Caspian actually says as much in ''Dawn Treader'' -- the Treader''--the issue is slavery, but they're talking in general terms. Even the author/narrator, when he's writing about our world, is always dropping in things like how sweets used to be cheaper and kids don't know to swear on the Bible anymore, and Eustace's liberal, modern upbringing is described basically as code to show that he's going to be an unsympathetic jerk. There are also a couple of technological anachronisms in Narnia, like Mrs. Beaver's sewing machine, to combine the medieval and twentieth-century nostalgia. Sewing machines good, Plumptree's Vitaminized Nerve Food bad.)



** The origin of [[AdamAndEvePlot King Frank and Queen Helen]] makes this even more problematic. In TheMagiciansNephew, they were plucked from VictorianLondon -- specifically when "Mr. SherlockHolmes was still living in Baker Street" -- and became the first in a centuries-long line of royal humanity, and yet they somehow created a ''medieval'' society, not a Victorian one.

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** The origin of [[AdamAndEvePlot King Frank and Queen Helen]] makes this even more problematic. In TheMagiciansNephew, they were plucked from VictorianLondon -- specifically VictorianLondon--specifically when "Mr. SherlockHolmes was still living in Baker Street" -- and Street"--and became the first in a centuries-long line of royal humanity, and yet they somehow created a ''medieval'' society, not a Victorian one.



* Christopher Stasheff's ''Literature/WarlockOfGramarye'' series, while largely set in a spacefaring civilization, has one installment where the protagonists find themselves in an alternate Earth with much stronger magic than in the main series...and which is, surprise surprise, stuck in medieval stasis. One of the characters hypothesises that this is because the presence of magic has reduced the incentive towards technological development, but since magic can only be wielded by its practitioneers (as opposed to technology, which can be used by anyone once invented), the reliance on magic kept society in a feudal-style Magocracy.

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* Christopher Stasheff's ''Literature/WarlockOfGramarye'' series, while largely set in a spacefaring civilization, has one installment where the protagonists find themselves in an alternate Earth with much stronger magic than in the main series... and which is, surprise surprise, stuck in medieval stasis. One of the characters hypothesises that this is because the presence of magic has reduced the incentive towards technological development, but since magic can only be wielded by its practitioneers (as opposed to technology, which can be used by anyone once invented), the reliance on magic kept society in a feudal-style Magocracy.



* The ''Literature/PrinceRoger'' series has Marduk, a DeathWorld that for the most part hovers around "early Medieval" tech. Partially justified in that the climate does make inventing - or maintaining - the more advanced tech the Imperial Marines are used to much more difficult (torrential rain two or three times a day makes it harder to keep the insides of electrical components from getting compromised, and it makes inventing a good gunpowder rather tricky - although the Mardukans have managed it. This climate has also inspired them to invent incredibly sophisticated pump systems to keep their communities from flooding). The protagonists are also reluctant to change things ''too'' much - first, because they don't want to leave any distinct traces that they're there (they are trying to be as stealthy as a several-hundred-man march can be, after all) and second because they're wary of falling into the trap of cultural superiority.

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* The ''Literature/PrinceRoger'' series has Marduk, a DeathWorld that for the most part hovers around "early Medieval" tech. Partially justified in that the climate does make inventing - or maintaining - the inventing--or maintaining--the more advanced tech the Imperial Marines are used to much more difficult (torrential rain two or three times a day makes it harder to keep the insides of electrical components from getting compromised, and it makes inventing a good gunpowder rather tricky - although tricky--although the Mardukans have managed it. This climate has also inspired them to invent incredibly sophisticated pump systems to keep their communities from flooding). The protagonists are also reluctant to change things ''too'' much - first, much--first, because they don't want to leave any distinct traces that they're there (they are trying to be as stealthy as a several-hundred-man march can be, after all) and second because they're wary of falling into the trap of cultural superiority.



** Its also an example of an EnforcedTrope- 3,000 years prior to the story the world was a {{Magitek}}nical paradise with all kinds of magical and scientific wonders; the War of Power and the Breaking of the World, and the consequent massive upheavals brought all that crashing down and turned the planet into a DeathWorld. The "Enforced" part comes in the following thousand and two thousand years oe of the major villains, Ishamael, engineered both the Trolloc Wars and the collapse of Artur Hawkings massive continental empire. The villains ''wanted'' Medieval Stasis to make the world an easier place to conquer.

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** Its also an example of an EnforcedTrope- 3,000 EnforcedTrope--3,000 years prior to the story the world was a {{Magitek}}nical paradise with all kinds of magical and scientific wonders; the War of Power and the Breaking of the World, and the consequent massive upheavals brought all that crashing down and turned the planet into a DeathWorld. The "Enforced" part comes in the following thousand and two thousand years oe of the major villains, Ishamael, engineered both the Trolloc Wars and the collapse of Artur Hawkings massive continental empire. The villains ''wanted'' Medieval Stasis to make the world an easier place to conquer.



* Averted in Joanne Bertin's ''The Last Dragonlord'', though technological progress is ''very'' slow and culture is even more sluggish. The first Dragonlords, were-dragons born as humans, came into being when humans were tribal nomads. By the time the books are set in, it's a medieval equivalent. The youngest Dragonlord, a mere six hundred and keeping the same appearance he grew up with, is recognized by humans as a Yerrin noble of the Snow Cat clan by a look at how his hair is braided - six centuries and that didn't change at all. He's surprised and pleased by the invention of wind chimes, and states to an older Dragonlord that it's weird seeing glass windows everywhere; when he grew up it was a rare thing. His elder agrees, saying he never saw glass except for beads until ''long'' after he first Changed. In the next book two Dragonlords in a port city are dismayed to find that it's completely changed in the centuries since they'd been there, and they have no idea where anything is.

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* Averted in Joanne Bertin's ''The Last Dragonlord'', though technological progress is ''very'' slow and culture is even more sluggish. The first Dragonlords, were-dragons born as humans, came into being when humans were tribal nomads. By the time the books are set in, it's a medieval equivalent. The youngest Dragonlord, a mere six hundred and keeping the same appearance he grew up with, is recognized by humans as a Yerrin noble of the Snow Cat clan by a look at how his hair is braided - six braided--six centuries and that didn't change at all. He's surprised and pleased by the invention of wind chimes, and states to an older Dragonlord that it's weird seeing glass windows everywhere; when he grew up it was a rare thing. His elder agrees, saying he never saw glass except for beads until ''long'' after he first Changed. In the next book two Dragonlords in a port city are dismayed to find that it's completely changed in the centuries since they'd been there, and they have no idea where anything is.



* An interesting variant appears in ''Series/StargateSG1'', in which the Goa'uld are shown in ancient Egypt sequences as using the same technology as they do in the regular episodes. In the time that humans went from simple bows to nuclear missiles, the Goa'uld haven't added trigger guards to their guns. This is justified by Goa'uld culture being antithetical to good scientific practice (although Goa'uld scientists like Nirrti and Nerus do exist), and all their technology being stolen anyway, but to be this extreme, they need to be quite the PlanetOfHats. It's shown a few times that some isolated worlds, free from Goa'uld control, had actually advanced FURTHER technologically than humans on Earth.

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* An interesting variant appears in ''Series/StargateSG1'', in which the Goa'uld are shown in ancient Egypt sequences as using the same technology as they do in the regular episodes. In the time that humans went from simple bows to nuclear missiles, the Goa'uld haven't added trigger guards to their guns. This is justified by Goa'uld culture being antithetical to good scientific practice (although Goa'uld scientists like Nirrti and Nerus do exist), and all their technology being stolen anyway, but to be this extreme, they need to be quite the PlanetOfHats. It's shown a few times that some isolated worlds, free from Goa'uld control, had actually advanced FURTHER ''further'' technologically than humans on Earth.



* In ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', the Wraith systematically destroy any society advanced enough to pose a threat to them, meaning the most likely type of society will be of medieval level, or lower.This has the disadvantage of lower cullings in each planet each time they revisist since a lower technology level means higher child mortality as well as lower populations as people dont live long enough and the population doesnt reach to high.The Wraith Queen in the pilot is even suprised that Earths population is in "the billions". Subverting this is the Genii, who ''pretend'' to be at an agrarian level of development, but it's all just a ruse to keep the Wraith away from their secret underground facilities, which are about... somewhere between the 1940s and the 1960s.

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* In ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', the Wraith systematically destroy any society advanced enough to pose a threat to them, meaning the most likely type of society will be of medieval level, or lower.This has the disadvantage of lower cullings in each planet each time they revisist since a lower technology level means higher child mortality as well as lower populations as people dont live long enough and the population doesnt reach to high.The Wraith Queen in the pilot is even suprised that Earths population is in "the billions". Subverting this is the Genii, who ''pretend'' to be at an agrarian level of development, but it's all just a ruse to keep the Wraith away from their secret underground facilities, which are about... about… somewhere between the 1940s and the 1960s.



* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Up the Long Ladder" The Enterprise rescues a group of SpaceAmish who have lived as they have for 200 years, even keeping their Irish accents. In the same episode they come across the other, technological, group from the same original colonists of whom only five survived landing and they have been breeding through advanced cloning for 200 years - but evidently keeping their stasis so as not to develop space travel to go back and get more humans for their genetic pool.

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* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Up the Long Ladder" The Enterprise rescues a group of SpaceAmish who have lived as they have for 200 years, even keeping their Irish accents. In the same episode they come across the other, technological, group from the same original colonists of whom only five survived landing and they have been breeding through advanced cloning for 200 years - but years--but evidently keeping their stasis so as not to develop space travel to go back and get more humans for their genetic pool.



*** For those Elves that don't go around hugging trees, this is handwaved by suggestions that the Elves have avoided an industrial revolution for "aesthetic reasons" (even Dark Elves, apparently... maybe they're allergic to smoke) but can make "intricate clockwork and torsion-powered" artillery pieces that are supposedly every bit as good as equivalent gunpowder weapons. They don't live up to the hype. The stasis of the Dwarves, on the other hand, is explained by Dwarven society being in an old-is-good mentality. This actually has some resonance with real-life scientific theories - it is sometimes said that what it takes for a new theory to be accepted is for the older, more respected figures in the field who don't like the theory to die off... and Dwarves can live for a lot longer than humans. That the younger Dwarves with new ideas apparently have a tendency to run away to Imperial engineering schools where their ideas might meet more acceptance probably doesn't help.
** There's an interesting case with the Lizardmen - they're the oldest inhabitants of the Warhammer world, and apparently haven't invented the wheel yet, something even the Orcs have got around to. However, when some of them tried to colonise a new area, they were cut off from their froggy leaders and regressed to a less advanced society, with less magic and overall co-ordination. Those that tried to colonise a nearby island had no contact whatsoever, and pretty much became beasts. This seems to suggest that not only are the Lizardmen locked in Medieval Stasis, but that it's only due to the Slann that they're not going backwards.

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*** For those Elves that don't go around hugging trees, this is handwaved by suggestions that the Elves have avoided an industrial revolution for "aesthetic reasons" (even Dark Elves, apparently... maybe they're allergic to smoke) but can make "intricate clockwork and torsion-powered" artillery pieces that are supposedly every bit as good as equivalent gunpowder weapons. They don't live up to the hype. The stasis of the Dwarves, on the other hand, is explained by Dwarven society being in an old-is-good mentality. This actually has some resonance with real-life scientific theories - it theories--it is sometimes said that what it takes for a new theory to be accepted is for the older, more respected figures in the field who don't like the theory to die off... and Dwarves can live for a lot longer than humans. That the younger Dwarves with new ideas apparently have a tendency to run away to Imperial engineering schools where their ideas might meet more acceptance probably doesn't help.
** There's an interesting case with the Lizardmen - they're Lizardmen--they're the oldest inhabitants of the Warhammer world, and apparently haven't invented the wheel yet, something even the Orcs have got around to. However, when some of them tried to colonise a new area, they were cut off from their froggy leaders and regressed to a less advanced society, with less magic and overall co-ordination. Those that tried to colonise a nearby island had no contact whatsoever, and pretty much became beasts. This seems to suggest that not only are the Lizardmen locked in Medieval Stasis, but that it's only due to the Slann that they're not going backwards.



* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'''s city-plane of Ravnica has apparently been ruled by the exact same ten guilds for ten thousand years. This is handwaved to some extent by the existence of a powerful magical pact binding them all, and some change seems to still have happened (it's hard to picture the fractious slum-dwelling Gruul Clans having been the way they are 'now' from the beginning, for one thing)...still, considering how much happened in the same time in real life (basically all of recorded history), it's probably a good example of [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale Game Designers Having No Sense Of Scale]].

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* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'''s city-plane of Ravnica has apparently been ruled by the exact same ten guilds for ten thousand years. This is handwaved to some extent by the existence of a powerful magical pact binding them all, and some change seems to still have happened (it's hard to picture the fractious slum-dwelling Gruul Clans having been the way they are 'now' from the beginning, for one thing)...still, thing). Still, considering how much happened in the same time in real life (basically all of recorded history), it's probably a good example of [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale Game Designers Having No Sense Of Scale]].



* ''{{Bionicle}}'''s planet of Bara Magna. Following a literal EarthShatteringKaboom, during which the planet Spherus Magna split into three, the society of the desert region-turned-planet found itself in shambles. They created a system in which disputes over resources would be settled with gladiator matches, and when the story continues 100000 years later, nothing is any different -- even most of the ''people'' are still the same, thanks to their [[WeAreAsMayflies long-ass lifespans]]. Characters who were treated as inexperienced youngsters a hundred millennia ago are still seen as such. Super-powerful beings still continue their war that to the rest of the planet is only a memory. Some people, like Vastus, still feel guilty over what they've done in that war. True, the Iron Tribe died out and at some point the Skrall Tribe moved from the Northern mountains to the desert, but that's pretty much it. Society and technology never moved an inch forward, even though the characters built high-tech implants into themselves and had the war-machines of old to study.

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* ''{{Bionicle}}'''s planet of Bara Magna. Following a literal EarthShatteringKaboom, during which the planet Spherus Magna split into three, the society of the desert region-turned-planet found itself in shambles. They created a system in which disputes over resources would be settled with gladiator matches, and when the story continues 100000 years later, nothing is any different -- even different--even most of the ''people'' are still the same, thanks to their [[WeAreAsMayflies long-ass lifespans]]. Characters who were treated as inexperienced youngsters a hundred millennia ago are still seen as such. Super-powerful beings still continue their war that to the rest of the planet is only a memory. Some people, like Vastus, still feel guilty over what they've done in that war. True, the Iron Tribe died out and at some point the Skrall Tribe moved from the Northern mountains to the desert, but that's pretty much it. Society and technology never moved an inch forward, even though the characters built high-tech implants into themselves and had the war-machines of old to study.



* ''VideoGame/{{Starbound}}''- Starbound features a race of sentient robots left over from a failed society experiment that, due to a glitch, are stuck in the medieval ages both socially and technologically. This ironically allowed them to survive as all of the other experiments eventually wiped themselves out once they had the technology to do it.
* ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medieval II: Total War]]''- If you continue to play the game well after you pass/fail the requirements needed to beat it, and assuming you and another faction is still playing, you could potentially see Europe celebrating the year 1900 AD, yet have everything look as it did way back 900 years ago.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Starbound}}''- Starbound ''VideoGame/{{Starbound}}''--Starbound features a race of sentient robots left over from a failed society experiment that, due to a glitch, are stuck in the medieval ages both socially and technologically. This ironically allowed them to survive as all of the other experiments eventually wiped themselves out once they had the technology to do it.
* ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medieval II: Total War]]''- If War]]''--if you continue to play the game well after you pass/fail the requirements needed to beat it, and assuming you and another faction is still playing, you could potentially see Europe celebrating the year 1900 AD, yet have everything look as it did way back 900 years ago.



** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' hints that Hyrule's current state may be the result of a past cataclysm, which could explain the schizo tech in some areas. The prevalence of magic and the supernatural may also justify the slow pace of technology progress in some areas (think how much of modern medicine would be rendered obsolete in the face of cure-all potions), and the devastating reach of the Triforce Wars - as well as the various civil conflicts mentioned in backstory - probably didn't contribute much to its advancement.
* Tamriel in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''. [[labelnote:The reason]] The Dwemer, the ''last'' race to advance beyond the medieval level, were instantaneously banished from the face of the world (or [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence used their newfound knowledge to leave voluntarily]] - it's a subject of much in-universe debate) when they attempted to scientifically reproduce the powers of a god.[[/labelnote]] According to the descriptions in the book ''2920, The Last Year of the First Era'' (found in ''Morrowind'' and ''Oblivion''), the technology of that date was pretty much the same as it is in the games. ''Oblivion'' is set at the end of the third era (after its main quest, era 4 begins), which is 1,330 years after the events described in the book, so technology was stagnant for at least 1,330 years, maybe more. Seeing as man and mer only existed for ~7,000 years, this actually makes it worse because it means that they were in stasis for at least 20% of their existance. On the other hand, ''2920'' is historical fiction, so it might simply be in-universe AnachronismStew.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' hints that Hyrule's current state may be the result of a past cataclysm, which could explain the schizo tech in some areas. The prevalence of magic and the supernatural may also justify the slow pace of technology progress in some areas (think how much of modern medicine would be rendered obsolete in the face of cure-all potions), and the devastating reach of the Triforce Wars - as Wars--as well as the various civil conflicts mentioned in backstory - probably backstory--probably didn't contribute much to its advancement.
* Tamriel in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''. [[labelnote:The reason]] The Dwemer, the ''last'' race to advance beyond the medieval level, were instantaneously banished from the face of the world (or [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence used their newfound knowledge to leave voluntarily]] - it's voluntarily]]--it's a subject of much in-universe debate) when they attempted to scientifically reproduce the powers of a god.[[/labelnote]] According to the descriptions in the book ''2920, The Last Year of the First Era'' (found in ''Morrowind'' and ''Oblivion''), the technology of that date was pretty much the same as it is in the games. ''Oblivion'' is set at the end of the third era (after its main quest, era 4 begins), which is 1,330 years after the events described in the book, so technology was stagnant for at least 1,330 years, maybe more. Seeing as man and mer only existed for ~7,000 years, this actually makes it worse because it means that they were in stasis for at least 20% of their existance. On the other hand, ''2920'' is historical fiction, so it might simply be in-universe AnachronismStew.



*** [[spoiler: What actually caused the war was long standing social issues that weren't resolved between pureblood elves and humans and the Half-Elves stuck in between. As Half-Elves keep being rejected by the Elves EVERY SINGLE TIME the humans do something the Elves don't like, the purebloods isolate themselves from the world and the Half-Elves are forced to try and make their way in human society, including the creation of magitechnology, in order to gain acceptance, after being rejected by Elven Society. In the Phantasia Game, the heroes criticize the members of the archetypal HiddenElfVillage of the game's setting [[ScrewYouElves having ultimate responsibility for the Half-Elves actions and the damage caused by magi technology because they would toss the Half-Elves aside WITHOUT TEACHING THEM OF THE DANGERS OF MAGITEK or any other lessons in regards to respecting the power of mana that they wield beyond being something very convenient, or force the children to grow up without their elf parents to teach them the intricacies of magic and its relation to the world]]. The creators of the Mana Canon seen in Phantasia are even pointed out as being exclusively human raised, and as such were completely ignorant as to the repercusions of making mana powered weaponry and technology.]]

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*** [[spoiler: What actually caused the war was long standing social issues that weren't resolved between pureblood elves and humans and the Half-Elves stuck in between. As Half-Elves keep being rejected by the Elves EVERY SINGLE TIME ''every single time'' the humans do something the Elves don't like, the purebloods isolate themselves from the world and the Half-Elves are forced to try and make their way in human society, including the creation of magitechnology, in order to gain acceptance, after being rejected by Elven Society. In the Phantasia Game, the heroes criticize the members of the archetypal HiddenElfVillage of the game's setting [[ScrewYouElves having ultimate responsibility for the Half-Elves actions and the damage caused by magi technology because they would toss the Half-Elves aside WITHOUT TEACHING THEM OF THE DANGERS OF MAGITEK ''without teaching them of the dangers of magitek'' or any other lessons in regards to respecting the power of mana that they wield beyond being something very convenient, or force the children to grow up without their elf parents to teach them the intricacies of magic and its relation to the world]]. The creators of the Mana Canon seen in Phantasia are even pointed out as being exclusively human raised, and as such were completely ignorant as to the repercusions of making mana powered weaponry and technology.]]



** Interestingly, one game in this series completely averts this; ''Blood Omen 2'' takes place 400 years after the original ''Blood Omen'', and in that time has Nosgoth go from a midieval fantasy world with sparse dashings of magitek and steampunk to a full on industrial revolution(still, technically, magitek and steam punk, but on a much grander scale). Averting this trope is one of the reasons that ''Blood Omen 2'' is the least popular game in the franchise; most fans felt it didn't fit withe the over all tone of the series. Possibly justified, since the ones spearheading this revolution [[spoiler:are the Hylden, demonic beings mostly unaffected by the decay affecting everyone else since they rejected being part of the Wheel of Fate. And their reason for doing so is hardly benevolent -- they want to complete the weapon that will wipe out everyone on Nosgoth but themselves.]]

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** Interestingly, one game in this series completely averts this; ''Blood Omen 2'' takes place 400 years after the original ''Blood Omen'', and in that time has Nosgoth go from a midieval fantasy world with sparse dashings of magitek and steampunk to a full on industrial revolution(still, technically, magitek and steam punk, but on a much grander scale). Averting this trope is one of the reasons that ''Blood Omen 2'' is the least popular game in the franchise; most fans felt it didn't fit withe the over all tone of the series. Possibly justified, since the ones spearheading this revolution [[spoiler:are the Hylden, demonic beings mostly unaffected by the decay affecting everyone else since they rejected being part of the Wheel of Fate. And their reason for doing so is hardly benevolent -- they benevolent--they want to complete the weapon that will wipe out everyone on Nosgoth but themselves.]]



* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' can generate a world's history covering 200 to 1,000 years with normal parameters - even more, or less, with custom ones - and the only difference time makes to civilisation is that empires will be bigger and more megabeasts will have died. This may change, but the developer has said that the technology present in the game won't become more advanced than "1400 AD."
** On the other hand, players can make ludicrously complex death traps, like one that uses water funneled from a glacier to freeze enemies - it's essentially a liquid nitrogen thrower. This isn't even getting into other mechanisms; one player made a Turing-complete calculator.

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* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' can generate a world's history covering 200 to 1,000 years with normal parameters - even parameters--even more, or less, with custom ones - and ones--and the only difference time makes to civilisation is that empires will be bigger and more megabeasts will have died. This may change, but the developer has said that the technology present in the game won't become more advanced than "1400 AD."
** On the other hand, players can make ludicrously complex death traps, like one that uses water funneled from a glacier to freeze enemies - it's enemies--it's essentially a liquid nitrogen thrower. This isn't even getting into other mechanisms; one player made a Turing-complete calculator.



*** As of the end of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' this all may be changing; at least, it certainly appears that [[spoiler: humanity has discovered gunpowder...and that gunpowder plus magic is ''very'' destructive.]] The future ramifications of this remain to be seen.

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*** As of the end of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' this all may be changing; at least, it certainly appears that [[spoiler: humanity has discovered gunpowder... and that gunpowder plus magic is ''very'' destructive.]] The future ramifications of this remain to be seen.



** On the FOURTH hand you have [[spoiler: the Geth, the machine race that happen to not only have the most advanced technology (aside from the Reapers) and progress at the fastest rate, but since they believe in self determination, all of their tech is of their own design, and may be the only suitable counter against the Reapers.]]

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** On the FOURTH ''fourth'' hand you have [[spoiler: the Geth, the machine race that happen to not only have the most advanced technology (aside from the Reapers) and progress at the fastest rate, but since they believe in self determination, all of their tech is of their own design, and may be the only suitable counter against the Reapers.]]



* ''Videogame/GuildWars2'' averts this trope, with the 250 years between the first and second games having given way to full-scale industrialisation by the Charr - to the extent that the Charr have large gun platforms, cannon weaponry and even primitive tanks. Then there's [[CrystalSpiresAndTogas Asura]] [[MagiTek technology]].

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* ''Videogame/GuildWars2'' averts this trope, with the 250 years between the first and second games having given way to full-scale industrialisation by the Charr - to Charr--to the extent that the Charr have large gun platforms, cannon weaponry and even primitive tanks. Then there's [[CrystalSpiresAndTogas Asura]] [[MagiTek technology]].



* Earth - Industrial technology has existed for at least 2500 years going back to Ancient Greece, but it wasn't till the end of the eighteenth century that one small, damp little island in the corner of Eurasia decided to do something with it.

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* Earth - Industrial Earth--Industrial technology has existed for at least 2500 years going back to Ancient Greece, but it wasn't till the end of the eighteenth century that one small, damp little island in the corner of Eurasia decided to do something with it.



*** The kicking off of an industrial revolution requires several complex factors, none of which Ancient Greece had.. To begin with, the place has to have basic law and order. It also has to make economic sense for people to invest in tools and machines to do things rather than just hiring (more) people and animals. Furthermore, people have to be able to get money to pay all these tools and machines - which means (easy-to-obtain) loans and institutions which can issue them at reasonable rates of interest. And that's just for efficient arable-''farming'', never mind the intricacies of manufacturing industries.

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*** The kicking off of an industrial revolution requires several complex factors, none of which Ancient Greece had.. To begin with, the place has to have basic law and order. It also has to make economic sense for people to invest in tools and machines to do things rather than just hiring (more) people and animals. Furthermore, people have to be able to get money to pay all these tools and machines - which machines--which means (easy-to-obtain) loans and institutions which can issue them at reasonable rates of interest. And that's just for efficient arable-''farming'', never mind the intricacies of manufacturing industries.



* The list of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_inventions things]] invented by citizens of the various Chinese Empires is quite long and rather impressive. It is also definitive proof that even a combination of technology, prosperity, and stability do not necessarily lead to industrialization. The Chinese Empires were the most populous realms in all the world in every age, but none of those Empires were engaged in intercontinental shipping or large-scale gunpowder warfare. A lot of this is due to the physical circumstances of those Empires - sprawling over huge areas, with all the natural resources they could ever need relatively easily to-hand. Europe was resource-poor by comparison, in addition to being incredibly factious and yet having a much better-integrated continental market (due to all the sea- and riverine-trade routes), whereas China was a contiguous country that had been unified (and remained so) long before. The Armies of the Qing Empire, for instance, had zero need for artillery pieces as they spent virtually all their time fighting Mongols, and simply hired lots of (cheap) marines for boarding actions against pirates. Intercontinental shipping made investments in relatively accurate time-keeping devices (to measure longitude for navigational purposes) and other navigational aids worthwhile. Thus did the 17th-century Empire of the Qing (under the Qianlong Emperor) use astronomical knowledge brought by Jesuit priests to make improvements to their Song-era (c. 12th-century) Lunar Calender, which had begun to fall out of sync with the actual moon.

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* The list of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_inventions things]] invented by citizens of the various Chinese Empires is quite long and rather impressive. It is also definitive proof that even a combination of technology, prosperity, and stability do not necessarily lead to industrialization. The Chinese Empires were the most populous realms in all the world in every age, but none of those Empires were engaged in intercontinental shipping or large-scale gunpowder warfare. A lot of this is due to the physical circumstances of those Empires - sprawling Empire--sprawling over huge areas, with all the natural resources they could ever need relatively easily to-hand. Europe was resource-poor by comparison, in addition to being incredibly factious and yet having a much better-integrated continental market (due to all the sea- and riverine-trade routes), whereas China was a contiguous country that had been unified (and remained so) long before. The Armies of the Qing Empire, for instance, had zero need for artillery pieces as they spent virtually all their time fighting Mongols, and simply hired lots of (cheap) marines for boarding actions against pirates. Intercontinental shipping made investments in relatively accurate time-keeping devices (to measure longitude for navigational purposes) and other navigational aids worthwhile. Thus did the 17th-century Empire of the Qing (under the Qianlong Emperor) use astronomical knowledge brought by Jesuit priests to make improvements to their Song-era (c. 12th-century) Lunar Calender, which had begun to fall out of sync with the actual moon.
27th Feb '16 12:09:09 PM Willbyr
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[[caption-width-right:280:[[LuddWasRight Who needs progress anyhow?]]...]]

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[[quoteright:280:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/castle-at-medieval-times.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:280:[[LuddWasRight Who needs progress anyhow?]]...]]
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27th Feb '16 8:54:21 AM SKJAM
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Added DiffLines:

* Played with in Creator/JohnBrunner's novella ''Father of Lies''. Amateur paranormal researchers in the 1960s find an anomalous spot in Britain that doesn't seem to have changed since the Middle Ages. In reality, [[spoiler: a RealityWarper mutant child forced this on an 1840s community, basing their new society on garbled Arthurian legend, the cultural stasis has only existed since then due to him enforcing it.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MedievalStasis