History Main / MedievalMorons

13th Apr '17 2:24:27 AM Chabal2
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* ''Series/{{Kaamelott}}'' is based almost entirely on this, with KingArthur as the OnlySaneMan due to his Roman upbringing. His knights are forever bickering about finding the Grail instead of looking for it, his father-in-law builds a catapult in the main courtyard and wants to knock down the gate so it can be taken outside, and then you have Guethenoc and Roparzh, two peasants with a mutual case of SitcomArchNemesis who don't mind setting fire to half the land or poisoning most of the livestock to get back at each other despite it meaning starvation for them and the rest of the country.

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* ''Series/{{Kaamelott}}'' is based almost entirely on this, with KingArthur as the OnlySaneMan due to his Roman upbringing. His knights are forever bickering about finding the Grail instead of looking for it, his father-in-law builds a catapult in the main courtyard and wants to knock down the gate so it can be taken outside, and then you have Guethenoc and Roparzh, two peasants with a mutual case of SitcomArchNemesis who don't mind setting fire to half the land or poisoning most of the livestock to get back at each other despite it meaning starvation for them and the rest of the country.
country. Lancelot's betrayal isn't even due to kidnapping the queen [[spoiler:she leaves of her own accord, to Arthur's delight]], it's because the knights are as bad as the peasants so he sets up his own army. The fact that his soldiers are just as inept as Kaamelott's never seems to occur to him.




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* ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasy'': Peasants in the Empire and Bretonnia are seen as this by the nobles. Some of them are indeed this (whether through inbreeding, aristocratic oppression or superstitions that lead to burning the state-approved wizard because they can't read his papers and don't want to bother finding someone who can). It doesn't help that in some areas, the smarter peasants know that getting the nobs involved in matters of justice only leads to more trouble for everyone involved, so they ObfuscateStupidity, perpetuating the stereotype among aristocracy that peasants are clumsy oafs capable of accidentally stabbing themselves in the back with a scythe seventeen times.
23rd Mar '17 9:47:52 PM Fireblood
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\n* Averted in the short story ''Death in Vesunna'' by Creator/HarryTurtledove, where two time travelers in the late Roman Empire murder someone with a gun to steal a lost book worth millions which they can then sell to future collectors. They're confident none of the locals will be able to figure out how he died before they can go back. However, the local Roman equivalent of the police chief, along with his physician friend, successfully deduce what happened and catch them.
4th Mar '17 10:52:48 AM nombretomado
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* OlderThanRadio: ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt''. Of course, [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny the trope was new]] when MarkTwain used it, and he was trying to portray the [[AristocratsAreEvil evils of aristocracy]]. Still, it's exaggerated and unhistorical, with most of the characters just generally acting TooDumbToLive. He was also satirizing the excessively poetic and romantic portrayals of Arthurian legend that were popular at the time--by pointing out that, had Arthur and his knights actually behaved as they were typically portrayed, they would have had to have been absolutely childlike morons.

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* OlderThanRadio: ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt''. Of course, [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny the trope was new]] when MarkTwain Creator/MarkTwain used it, and he was trying to portray the [[AristocratsAreEvil evils of aristocracy]]. Still, it's exaggerated and unhistorical, with most of the characters just generally acting TooDumbToLive. He was also satirizing the excessively poetic and romantic portrayals of Arthurian legend that were popular at the time--by pointing out that, had Arthur and his knights actually behaved as they were typically portrayed, they would have had to have been absolutely childlike morons.
1st Mar '17 11:13:15 AM CurledUpWithDakka
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:: All of this combined results in some scholars viewing the Renaissance not as the end of the medieval period, but as the ''result'' of it.

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:: All **All of this combined results in some scholars viewing the Renaissance not as the end of the medieval period, but as the ''result'' of it.
1st Mar '17 10:33:42 AM eroock
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->''Your average peasant had the IQ of an extremely rotten tree stump and the common sense of a very small lump of mud....''
-->--'''Top Ten Horror Stories'''

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->''Your
->''"Your
average peasant had the IQ of an extremely rotten tree stump and the common sense of a very small lump of mud....''
-->--'''Top
mud..."''
-->-- '''Top
Ten Horror Stories'''
19th Jan '17 1:15:59 PM DoctorDetective
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* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}''. Characters from TheFuture commonly refer to the 20th century as "The Stupid Ages." Leela even tells Fry that being a drop-out of a 20th-century college means nothing in their time, so Fry ends up enrolling in a college in order to drop-out properly.

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* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}''. Characters from TheFuture commonly refer to the 20th century as "The Stupid Ages." Leela even tells Fry that being a drop-out of a 20th-century college means nothing is the equivalent of being a ''high-school'' drop-out in their time, the 31st century, so Fry ends up enrolling in a college in order to drop-out properly.
19th Jan '17 1:12:33 PM DoctorDetective
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19th Jan '17 1:11:26 PM DoctorDetective
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* Nutritional deficiencies in the general population could lead to other forms of mental retardation and physical disability, especially during times of famine and hitting pregnant women (and their unborn children) in particular; for example, during the Middle Ages in Europe, there was an epidemic of cretinism in parts of the Swiss Alps due to iodine deficiency, and the effects of both lead and alcohol poisoning were unknown at the time. All this could possibly have led to substantially lowered IQ and developmental disabilities.
** Lead and alcohol poisoning risks and effects were well known. In the former, alcohol was safer than water. In the latter, lead was cheap, easy to work, and made for very effective and airtight seals on containers, and they thought it required much more lead than we know now to be the case to cause lead poisoning. They knew the risks and dangers, and did it because it was more practicable for them than alternatives. Where healthier and safer alternatives existed, especially if they were practicable ones, they were readily used. Lead pipes are in use in first world countries in the year 2016. They can be relatively safe if they have a protective coating, but if that coating is dissolved (e.g. by more acidic water) all bets are off.
** Actually the alcohol thing is now partially believed to be a modern misconception as well. It was never all that hard or difficult to get spring or river water (though the rule "Don't shit where you drink" took until the 19th century to really take hold) for most medieval people, what ''was'' hard was ensuring a large enough supply of edible grain. Beer can be made from much lower quality grain than bread and thus it was a staple of the diet of e.g. medieval monks (of which shopping lists and menus survive). Compared to modern beer it appears to have been less watery, less hoppy and weaker in terms of alcohol content making for a relatively nutritious drink. Even the free laborers that built the pyramids had an amount of beer in their rations that would qualify them as TheAlcoholic today.
*** Creator/MaryRenault has a bit about this in her books on UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat, especially ''The Persian Boy'', in the sections on mixing wine with water to prevent disease.

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* Nutritional deficiencies in the general population could lead to other forms of mental retardation and physical disability, especially during times of famine and hitting pregnant women (and their unborn children) in particular; for example, during the Middle Ages in Europe, there was an epidemic of cretinism in parts of the Swiss Alps due to iodine deficiency, and and, while the effects of both lead and alcohol poisoning were unknown somewhat known at the time. time, the dangers of fresh water and the benefits of using lead were thought to outweigh them. All this could possibly have led to substantially lowered IQ and developmental disabilities.
** Lead and alcohol poisoning risks and effects were well known. In the former, alcohol was safer than water. In the latter, lead was cheap, easy to work, and made for very effective and airtight seals on containers, and they thought it required much more lead than we know now to be the case to cause lead poisoning. They knew the risks and dangers, and did it because it was more practicable for them than alternatives. Where healthier and safer alternatives existed, especially if they were practicable ones, they were readily used. Lead pipes are in use in first world countries in the year 2016. They can be relatively safe if they have a protective coating, but if that coating is dissolved (e.g. by more acidic water) all bets are off.
** Actually the alcohol thing is now partially believed to be a modern misconception as well. It was never all that hard or difficult to get spring or river water (though the rule "Don't shit where you drink" took until the 19th century to really take hold) for most medieval people, what ''was'' hard was ensuring a large enough supply of edible grain. Beer can be made from much lower quality grain than bread and thus it was a staple of the diet of e.g. medieval monks (of which shopping lists and menus survive). Compared to modern beer it appears to have been less watery, less hoppy and weaker in terms of alcohol content making for a relatively nutritious drink. Even the free laborers that built the pyramids had an amount of beer in their rations that would qualify them as TheAlcoholic today.
*** Creator/MaryRenault has a bit about this in her books on UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat, especially ''The Persian Boy'', in the sections on mixing wine with water to prevent disease.
disabilities.
14th Dec '16 10:48:26 PM RoseAndHeather
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* Subverted in the book ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'', in which the doctor of a time-displaced modern American town has to consult with his "downtime" counterpart. It becomes clear that the "local" doctor not only ''doesn't'' use leeches and ground bat's wing, but has a medical library in nearly a dozen languages, a few of them English ([[{{Omniglot}} all of which he speaks fluently]], against the US doctor's... just English). The local high school history teacher, Melissa Mailey, breaks down laughing and says "[[YouSuck You didn't actually think]] you were ''smarter'' than him, did you?" In addition, although they have their initial fears, the early modern characters are extremely quick to recognize and appreciate American technology instead of writing it off as witchcraft and even logically deduce why it cannot be magic.

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* Subverted in the book ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'', in which the doctor of a time-displaced modern American town has to consult with his "downtime" counterpart. It becomes clear that the "local" doctor not only ''doesn't'' use leeches and ground bat's wing, but has a medical library in nearly a dozen languages, a few of them English ([[{{Omniglot}} all of which he speaks fluently]], against the US doctor's... just English).fluently. Some of those books are even in English. Uptimer doctor James Nichols, who is fluent in English and... English, is completely dumbfounded. The local high school history teacher, Melissa Mailey, breaks down laughing and says "[[YouSuck You didn't actually think]] you were ''smarter'' than him, did you?" In addition, although they have their initial fears, the early modern characters are extremely quick to recognize and appreciate American technology instead of writing it off as witchcraft and even logically deduce why it cannot be magic.
6th Sep '16 2:40:36 AM Morgenthaler
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** The ByzantineEmpire allowed its citizens great freedom, equality, and opportunity for education and advancement thanks to its first Empress [[RagsToRoyalty who began life as a foreign born commoner]] and ended life as half of a RulingCouple. It also preserved and expanded the Musaeum of Alexandria,[[note]]The library of Alexandria and several related universities and institutions[[/note]] and advanced science and engineering to surprising levels[[note]]Their military, for instance, deployed advanced weaponry like flamethrowers and ship-mounted ballistae. Constantinople had public sanitation and proper sewer and water systems. The Hagia Sophia was the largest freestanding domed structure on Earth until the construction of the ''Astrodome in the modern era''.[[/note]] before political decay and the encroachment of neighboring empires led to its own collapse.

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** The ByzantineEmpire UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire allowed its citizens great freedom, equality, and opportunity for education and advancement thanks to its first Empress [[RagsToRoyalty who began life as a foreign born commoner]] and ended life as half of a RulingCouple. It also preserved and expanded the Musaeum of Alexandria,[[note]]The library of Alexandria and several related universities and institutions[[/note]] and advanced science and engineering to surprising levels[[note]]Their military, for instance, deployed advanced weaponry like flamethrowers and ship-mounted ballistae. Constantinople had public sanitation and proper sewer and water systems. The Hagia Sophia was the largest freestanding domed structure on Earth until the construction of the ''Astrodome in the modern era''.[[/note]] before political decay and the encroachment of neighboring empires led to its own collapse.
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