History Main / MeanwhileInTheFuture

18th Apr '17 6:10:45 PM JoeMerl
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* ''Comicbook/{{PS238}}'' #20, culminating a long and delightfully complex time travel plot, has fun with this.

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* ''Comicbook/{{PS238}}'' #20, culminating has a long and delightfully complex complicated time travel plot, plotline, and one setting that takes place ''outside'' of time, so it has some fun with this. this:


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-->''In what could pass for a loose definition of "meanwhile"...''
-->''Relatively meanwhile, in between "tick" and "tock," just south of twenty-five o'clock...''
16th Apr '17 6:32:59 PM nombretomado
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* In StarTrekDeepSpaceNine episode "Past Tense", Sisko and Bashir accidentally interfere with a riot that was supposed to lead to the social change that helped the creation of the Federation. At that point in time ''in the telling of the story,'' (I.e viewer's time, not the actual time in the story's universe) the other characters see the Federation disappear! The same happens in reverse when they put things right...

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* In StarTrekDeepSpaceNine ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Past Tense", Sisko and Bashir accidentally interfere with a riot that was supposed to lead to the social change that helped the creation of the Federation. At that point in time ''in the telling of the story,'' (I.e viewer's time, not the actual time in the story's universe) the other characters see the Federation disappear! The same happens in reverse when they put things right...
15th Apr '17 5:26:31 PM nombretomado
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* SonicCD made use of it as well. It even gave a 'Good Future' bonus when you beat Robotnik/Eggman.
* In ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin Prince of Persia: Warrior Within]]'', the Prince uses time portals dotted around the castle on the Island of Time to get past broken down areas, activate devices that create paths for him in his own time and generally messes with the timeline to survive. Of course, messing with the timeline is what got him in that situation to begin with.\\\

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* SonicCD ''VideoGame/SonicCD'' made use of it as well. It even gave a 'Good Future' bonus when you beat Robotnik/Eggman.
* In ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin Prince of Persia: Warrior Within]]'', ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin'', the Prince uses time portals dotted around the castle on the Island of Time to get past broken down areas, activate devices that create paths for him in his own time and generally messes with the timeline to survive. Of course, messing with the timeline is what got him in that situation to begin with.\\\



* As good as the story of [[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time]] may have been, its time-travel system was rather absurd. First, there's the fact that time seems to pass in the Present while you're in the Past and vice versa, like they were separated realms, though this can probably be explained by the whole PortalToThePast thing. Second, the Mushroom Kingdom was taken over by the Shroobs in the past, leaving the Kingdom in the Present.... completely UNAFFECTED! Some might see this as a result of a StableTimeLoop, as Mario and Luigi defeat the Shroobs anyway, but that leads into a Paradox, since they can only defeat them because Present Mushroom Kingdom was free from the Shroob in the first place. Also, they are changing E.Gadd's past heavily... with the only result being him inventing some gadget. E. Gadd [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this trope by noting how paradoxical it is.

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* As good as the story of [[VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time]] ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiPartnersInTime'' may have been, its time-travel system was rather absurd. First, there's the fact that time seems to pass in the Present while you're in the Past and vice versa, like they were separated realms, though this can probably be explained by the whole PortalToThePast thing. Second, the Mushroom Kingdom was taken over by the Shroobs in the past, leaving the Kingdom in the Present.... completely UNAFFECTED! Some might see this as a result of a StableTimeLoop, as Mario and Luigi defeat the Shroobs anyway, but that leads into a Paradox, since they can only defeat them because Present Mushroom Kingdom was free from the Shroob in the first place. Also, they are changing E.Gadd's past heavily... with the only result being him inventing some gadget. E. Gadd [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this trope by noting how paradoxical it is.
11th Apr '17 6:11:04 PM JoeMerl
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* ''Comicbook/{{PS238}}'' #20, culminating a long and delightfully complex time travel plot, has fun with this. When [[BigBadWannabe Zodon]] is lost in the timestream we get a narration box saying

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* ''Comicbook/{{PS238}}'' #20, culminating a long and delightfully complex time travel plot, has fun with this. When [[BigBadWannabe Zodon]] is lost in the timestream we get a narration box saying
11th Apr '17 6:10:29 PM JoeMerl
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Comicbook/{{PS238}}'' #20, culminating a long and delightfully complex time travel plot, has fun with this. When [[BigBadWannabe Zodon]] is lost in the timestream we get a narration box saying
-->''At that, and just about every ''other'' moment in time and space...''
-->''"Suddenly," in the year 2000...''
-->''Meanwhile, relatively, in the present time...''
2nd Apr '17 5:34:52 PM DustSnitch
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* ''Literature/SeekersOfTheSky'' has the recurring plotline of the Redeemer ([[AlternateHistory replacement]] {{Jesus}}), which is repeatedly alluded to in the present-day narration but revealed only in small heaps across two books.

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* ''Literature/SeekersOfTheSky'' has the recurring plotline of the Redeemer ([[AlternateHistory replacement]] {{Jesus}}), UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}), which is repeatedly alluded to in the present-day narration but revealed only in small heaps across two books.
31st Mar '17 9:14:06 PM KaiYves
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* The [[TheEighties late-80s]]/[[TheNineties early-90s]] children's archaeology series [[https://www.librarything.com/publisherseries/Time+Quest Time Quest]] would alternate chapters between an account of a present-day excavation/expedition and a semi-fictionalized story set in the past based on the artifacts that had been discovered.
13th Mar '17 11:58:08 AM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' - The episode "Captain Jack Harkness", set in 1941/2008.
** Also played straight in the first episode of series two, "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang" with the conversation between Captains Jack and John, concerning the stat of the Time Agency, an agency which won't exist for several thousand years.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' episode "Triangle" is split between modern-day shenanigans and the events of a doomed 30s cruise liner.

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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' - The episode "Captain Jack Harkness", set in 1941/2008.
** Also played straight
In the third and final series of ''Series/AshesToAshes'', Alex's voiceover on the opening titles mentions time running out for her to get back home (i.e. to the present day). This isn't explained in the first episode of series two, "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang" with slightest, though, since neither world, now or then, is in any imminent danger whatsoever.
** Maybe explained by
the conversation between Captains Jack finale.
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'':
** While a powerless Chris is fighting future Wyatt in the... well, future, the Charmed Ones write a spell that gives back powers
and John, concerning hastily hide it in the stat of the Time Agency, an agency which attic where Chris can find it. Why bother hurrying hiding a spell that Chris won't exist use until more than twenty years later?
** A demon steals 3-year-old Wyatt's powers. Shortly thereafter, twenty-or-so-year-old Chris and Wyatt show up, having time-travelled from the future, saying "We were just fighting some demons, when Wyatt's powers disappeared. So we thought we'd time travel back to the point in time when this was caused." Wait... what? The logical consequence of 3-year-old Wyatt losing his powers would have been...that he has no powers at age 4, 5, 6 all the way up to 20 (and beyond that,
for several thousand years.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' episode "Triangle" is split between modern-day shenanigans
that matter). Or that they fix the problem and he regains his powers at 3 and keeps them till age 20. How the events of a doomed 30s cruise liner.heck did his 20-year-old self have powers and then randomly lose them? Why not his 40-year-old self? There's no way this makes sense.
** Unless characters who have interacted with each other retain the same present in different times: for example the sisters have to plant the spell before the Chris who has just left them - not the one who only has the potential to be him - meets with the danger.



** The episode "Blink" has various characters in three different time periods. There is a very eerie illusion of communication between the three periods, but in fact, with the exception of a throw-away joke at the start of the episode which is never explained, it's entirely justified. The communication at the start of the episode is explained in the same way all of it is, by invoking the TimeyWimeyBall. The Doctor learns the future side of the conversation in the future, then travels into the past to repeat his side of the conversation and leave other clues that aren't even his idea. He's just copying them from the future.
** Episode "The Girl in the Fireplace" where specific time-windows are open onto various points in one woman's life. These progress in real time, making the trope justified.
** "The Parting of the Ways" has Rose contemplating the Doctor's imminent destruction - several hundred millenia in the future. She's in a tremendous hurry to get back the future and rescue the Doctor, despite the fact that, logically, there's really no need to rush, as her companions point out totally unconcerned, while for her it had just been happening right then. Given that [[spoiler: Rose pilots the TARDIS by effectively becoming a God, so can put it where/when she needs]], there really was no real need to rush.
--->'''Rose:''' Two hundred thousand years in the future, he's dying, and there's nothing I can do.
--->'''Jackie:''' Well, like you said, two hundred thousand years, it's way off.
--->'''Rose:''' But it's not. It's now. That fight is happening right now.
*** The dilemma was not really about how to get back to the future quickly, it was whether to try and do anything about it at all. It appears that at least several days have gone by while Rose was back home (meanwhile, in the future it was only minutes or hours), and she was never specifically worried about being in a hurry.

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** The episode "Blink" has various characters in three different time periods. There is a very eerie illusion Possibly invoked [[Recap/DoctorWhoS10E1TheThreeDoctors "The Three Doctors"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E1ArcOfInfinity "Arc of communication between the three periods, but in fact, with the exception of a throw-away joke at the start of the episode which is never explained, Infinity"]], where action takes place on present day and/or near future Earth and also on Gallifrey. However, since it's entirely justified. never really been clear where Gallifrey's "present" is in relation to Earth's, it cannot be sure.
**
The communication at the start of the classic series episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E1TerrorOfTheZygons "Terror of the Zygons"]] mentioned that the Brigadier literally had a "space-time telegraph" with which he could call the Doctor, though he was explicitly instructed not to use it except in extreme emergencies. The device came up once again in the 50th anniversary special, where the enemies were, once again, the Zygons. It seems that the telegraph is explained linked to the TARDIS in such a way that it connects them at the same points in their relative (subjective) time, justifying this trope.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead "Mawdryn Undead"]] shows the Doctor separated from his companions
in the same way all of it is, by invoking the TimeyWimeyBall. place six years apart. The Doctor learns the future side of the conversation needs to know what happened in the future, then travels into the past to repeat his side of the conversation and leave other clues that aren't even his idea. He's just copying them from the future.
** Episode "The Girl
when in the Fireplace" where specific time-windows are open onto various points in one woman's life. These progress in real time, making the trope justified.
** "The Parting of the Ways" has Rose contemplating the Doctor's imminent destruction - several hundred millenia in the future. She's in a tremendous hurry
order to get back the future and rescue the Doctor, despite the fact that, logically, there's really no need to rush, as her companions point out totally unconcerned, while for her it had just been happening right then. Given that [[spoiler: Rose pilots the TARDIS by effectively becoming a God, so can put it where/when she needs]], there really was no real need to rush.
--->'''Rose:''' Two hundred thousand years in the future, he's dying, and there's nothing I can do.
--->'''Jackie:''' Well, like you said, two hundred thousand years, it's way off.
--->'''Rose:''' But it's not. It's now. That fight is happening right now.
*** The dilemma was not really about how to get back to the future quickly, it was whether to try and do anything about it at all. It appears that at least several days have gone by while Rose was back home (meanwhile, in the future it was only minutes or hours), and she was never specifically worried about being in a hurry.
rejoin them.



** Winston Churchill calling the Doctor thousands of years in the future. Maybe his phone just picks a random point in time that the Doctor's in his TARDIS?
** River Song contacts him via his psychic paper, with no explanation given for when in the Doctor's timeline this message reaches him.
** The classic series episode "Terror of the Zygons" mentioned that the Brigadier literally had a "space-time telegraph" with which he could call the Doctor, though he was expicitly instructed not to use it except in extreme emergencies. The device came up once again in the 50th anniversary special, where the enemies were, once again, the Zygons. It seems that the telegraph is linked to the TARDIS in such a way that it connects them at the same points in their relative (subjective) time, justifying this trope.
** In "The Pandorica Opens", the Doctor and River are in a constant conversation over the phone while one is on the TARDIS traveling in time. After they get cut off, things stay "in sync": [[spoiler:the TARDIS explodes in 2010 and the shockwave is "immediately" felt in the second century (but not before).]]
** In "The End of Time Part One" an Ood uses the phrase "Events that have happened are happening now."
** Possibly invoked in the episodes, "The Three Doctors" and "Arc of Infinity" where action takes place on present day and/or near future Earth and also on Gallifrey. However, since it's never really been clear where Gallifrey's "present" is in relation to Earth's, it cannot be sure.
** Mawdryn Undead shows the Doctor separated from his companions in the same place six years apart. The Doctor needs to know what happened in the past and when in order to rejoin them.
* This happens quite often in ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', being as it deals with characters from both the present and the future [[spoiler: (multiple futures, actually)]]. A notable example is the double episode featuring Jesse on her submarine in the future while Sarah and co. do their thing in the present, used to explain the backstory behind [[spoiler: Catherine Weaver]].
* In the 1980's version of ''Series/TwilightZone'', the episode "A Message From Charity" tells the story of an '80s teenage boy communicating with a teenage girl in Salem 300 years earlier, and [[spoiler:communicating what he found in a history book to save her from a lecherous "judge"]].

to:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E13ThePartingOfTheWays "The Parting of the Ways"]] has Rose contemplating the Doctor's imminent destruction -- several hundred millennia in the future. She's in a tremendous hurry to get back the future and rescue the Doctor, despite the fact that, logically, there's really no need to rush, as her companions point out totally unconcerned, while for her it had just been happening right then. Given that [[spoiler: Rose pilots the TARDIS by effectively becoming a God, so can put it where/when she needs]], there really was no real need to rush.
--->'''Rose:''' Two hundred thousand years in the future, he's dying, and there's nothing I can do.\\
'''Jackie:''' Well, like you said, two hundred thousand years, it's way off.\\
'''Rose:''' But it's not. It's now. That fight is happening right now.
*** The dilemma was not really about how to get back to the future quickly, it was whether to try and do anything about it at all. It appears that at least several days have gone by while Rose was back home (meanwhile, in the future it was only minutes or hours), and she was never specifically worried about being in a hurry.
** Several people, most notably [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E1NewEarth the Face of Boe]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E8SilenceInTheLibrary River Song]], have contacted the Doctor via his psychic paper, without knowing where in his timeline the message will reach him. In River's case, she was clearly expecting a future Doctor who actually knew who she was.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E4TheGirlInTheFireplace "The Girl in the Fireplace"]]: [[TimePortal Time windows]] have been opened onto various points in the life of Madame de Pompadour. These progress in real time, making the trope justified.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] has various characters in three different time periods. There is a very eerie illusion of communication between the three periods, but in fact, with the exception of a throw-away joke at the start of the episode which is never explained, it's entirely justified. The communication at the start of the episode is explained in the same way all of it is, by invoking the TimeyWimeyBall. The Doctor learns the future side of the conversation in the future, then travels into the past to repeat his side of the conversation and leave other clues that aren't even his idea. He's just copying them from the future.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E17E18TheEndOfTime "The End of Time"]]: An Ood says "Things that have happened are happening now" as the Doctor races back to the 21[[superscript:st]] century, and arrives too late to stop [[spoiler:the Master's resurrection]]. It's strongly implied there's a great big TimeyWimeyBall involved in the events of the story.
** At the end of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E2TheBeastBelow "The Beast Below"]],
Winston Churchill calling calls the Doctor thousands of years in the future. Maybe his phone just picks a random point in time that the Doctor's in his TARDIS?
** River Song contacts him via his psychic paper, with no explanation given for when in the Doctor's timeline this message reaches him.
** The classic series episode "Terror of the Zygons" mentioned that the Brigadier literally had a "space-time telegraph" with which he could call the Doctor, though he was expicitly instructed not to use it except in extreme emergencies. The device came up once again in the 50th anniversary special, where the enemies were, once again, the Zygons. It seems that the telegraph is linked to the TARDIS in such a way that it connects them at the same points in their relative (subjective) time, justifying this trope.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E12ThePandoricaOpens "The Pandorica Opens", Opens"]], the Doctor and River are in a constant conversation over the phone while one is on the TARDIS traveling in time. After they get cut off, things stay "in sync": [[spoiler:the TARDIS explodes in 2010 and the shockwave is "immediately" felt in the second century (but not before).]]
** In "The End of Time Part One" an Ood uses the phrase "Events that have happened are happening now."
** Possibly invoked
* Done in the episodes, "The Three Doctors" and "Arc of Infinity" where action takes place on present day and/or near future Earth and also on Gallifrey. However, since it's never really been clear where Gallifrey's "present" is in relation to Earth's, it cannot be sure.
** Mawdryn Undead shows the Doctor separated from his companions in the same place six years apart. The Doctor needs to know what happened in the past and when in order to rejoin them.
* This happens quite often in ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', being as it deals with characters from both the present and the future [[spoiler: (multiple futures, actually)]]. A notable example is the double
''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode featuring Jesse on her submarine "Different Destinations", with Jool, Pilot, and Chiana watching the Planet of the Week progressively deteriorate as John, Aeryn, and D'Argo stumble around in the future while Sarah and co. do their thing past.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' does this whilst Hiro was in Feudal Era Japan, as well as when Peter is
in the present, used to explain the backstory behind [[spoiler: Catherine Weaver]].
* In the 1980's version of ''Series/TwilightZone'', the
post-apocalyptic future.
** The UK DVD box [[LampshadeHanging actually says "Meanwhile, in Feudal Japan"]] in its
episode "A Message From Charity" tells the story synopsis for "Out of an '80s teenage boy communicating with Time".
** The episode Brother's Keeper has
a teenage girl in Salem 300 years earlier, and [[spoiler:communicating what he found in a history book to save her from a lecherous "judge"]].Meanwhile Eight Weeks Ago Where Time Is Stopped.



* Done in the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode "Different Destinations," with Jool, Pilot, and Chiana watching the Planet of the Week progressively deteriorate as John, Aeryn, and D'Argo stumble around in the past.

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* Done in In the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' ''Series/{{Lost}}'' episode "Different Destinations," "Because You Left", Daniel interacts with Jool, Pilot, Desmond at some indeterminate point in the past. The next scene is Desmond suddenly remembering this conversation over three years later, with the implication that these events are in some way concurrent.
** On ''Lost'', the past is immutable except for Desmond, so this is really weird regardless of when it updates. He's the only person who can alter the past,
and Chiana watching the Planet he appears to stop paradoxes by having crappy memory. (Both of the Week progressively deteriorate as John, Aeryn, past and D'Argo stumble around sometimes of the future.) It is perhaps notable that the other person, Daniel, who attempts to alter the past (But can't, except when Desmond is involved.) also has crappy memory. In both cases, they don't remember things they should have remembered until after those things 'were caused' in the past.present. [[FridgeBrilliance Perhaps that's how reality protects itself on Lost.]] If you went back to try to 'alter the past', the past version of you just remember events incorrectly until you decide to 'alter' it, after which point you correctly remember the way it always was, so no one really changes anything.
** In a more direct example, Lost's fifth season takes place in two different times. One group of characters are off the island in the "present" (2007), and another group is on the island, which is jumping through various time periods.
*** More recently, the season has been moving in the direction of reuniting the groups, though two old characters, along with a slew of new ones, are still stuck... in the future! On the whole, season five has shed the strict character-centric flashback/flashforward structure of previous seasons (the -forward part having been introduced [[spoiler:at the end of season three]]) in favor of more immediate ongoing plots in two time periods.
*** The Desmond interaction is possibly justified by the fact that he is jumping through time as well; perhaps a future Desmond shows up and recognizes Faraday.
** Notably, this device leads to a bit of FridgeLogic in "The Incident": there's no way they could have succeeded in [[spoiler:resetting time]], because the episode shows that everything is normal thirty years in the future.
* ''Series/OnceUponATime'' uses this very heavily. Most episodes cut back and forth between events "now" (in Storybrooke, or one of the magical realms) and some part of the backstory, taking place in the Enchanted Forest before the curse sent them to Earth.
* In ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'', the Rangers summon their [[HumongousMecha zords]] from the year 3000 when needed, and after a battle they return to the future. In one episode, the zords are damaged and have to be repaired in the future, preventing the Rangers from using them in the next episode. No explanation is given as to why they can't just summon the zords from 1000 years ''plus one week'' into the future, where they would be fully repaired.
** ''Series/PowerRangersSPD'' is implied to somehow run parallel to 2004, meaning that there was a year without monster attacks since the monsters were in 2025. There's no indication that ''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' followed ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'' without having SPD in the middle.
* Used a little in the ''Series/StargateSG1'' episode [[Recap/StargateSG1S2E211969 "1969"]]. After SG-1 is sent back in time to the eponymous year due to a TeleporterAccident, we jump back to the present for a shot of an airman telling Gen. Hammond that the team is several hours overdue. Hammond tells the airman that there's nothing they can do to help our heroes. We remain with SG-1 for the remainder of the episode.
* Justified in ''Series/{{Starstuff}},'' since time passes at the same rate on both sides of the communication link.



* In ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'', the Rangers summon their [[HumongousMecha zords]] from the year 3000 when needed, and after a battle they return to the future. In one episode, the zords are damaged and have to be repaired in the future, preventing the Rangers from using them in the next episode. No explanation is given as to why they can't just summon the zords from 1000 years ''plus one week'' into the future, where they would be fully repaired.
** ''Series/PowerRangersSPD'' is implied to somehow run parallel to 2004, meaning that there was a year without monster attacks since the monsters were in 2025. There's no indication that ''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' followed ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'' without having SPD in the middle.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' does this whilst Hiro was in Feudal Era Japan, as well as when Peter is in the post-apocalyptic future.
** The UK DVD box [[LampshadeHanging actually says "Meanwhile, in Feudal Japan"]] in its episode synopsis for "Out of Time".
** The episode Brother's Keeper has a Meanwhile Eight Weeks Ago Where Time Is Stopped.
* In the ''Series/{{Lost}}'' episode "Because You Left," Daniel interacts with Desmond at some indeterminate point in the past. The next scene is Desmond suddenly remembering this conversation over three years later, with the implication that these events are in some way concurrent.
** On Lost, the past is immutable except for Desmond, so this is really weird regardless of when it updates. He's the only person who can alter the past, and he appears to stop paradoxes by having crappy memory. (Both of the past and sometimes of the future.) It is perhaps notable that the other person, Daniel, who attempts to alter the past (But can't, except when Desmond is involved.) also has crappy memory. In both cases, they don't remember things they should have remembered until after those things 'were caused' in the present. [[FridgeBrilliance Perhaps that's how reality protects itself on Lost.]] If you went back to try to 'alter the past', the past version of you just remember events incorrectly until you decide to 'alter' it, after which point you correctly remember the way it always was, so no one really changes anything.
** In a more direct example, Lost's fifth season takes place in two different times. One group of characters are off the island in the "present" (2007), and another group is on the island, which is jumping through various time periods.
*** More recently, the season has been moving in the direction of reuniting the groups, though two old characters, along with a slew of new ones, are still stuck... in the future! On the whole, season five has shed the strict character-centric flashback/flashforward structure of previous seasons (the -forward part having been introduced [[spoiler:at the end of season three]]) in favor of more immediate ongoing plots in two time periods.
*** The Desmond interaction is possibly justified by the fact that he is jumping through time as well; perhaps a future Desmond shows up and recognizes Faraday.
** Notably, this device leads to a bit of FridgeLogic in "The Incident": there's no way they could have succeeded in [[spoiler:resetting time]], because the episode shows that everything is normal thirty years in the future.
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'':
** While a powerless Chris is fighting future Wyatt in the... well, future, the Charmed Ones write a spell that gives back powers and hastily hide it in the attic where Chris can find it. Why bother hurrying hiding a spell that Chris won't use until more than twenty years later?
** A demon steals 3-year-old Wyatt's powers. Shortly thereafter, twenty-or-so-year-old Chris and Wyatt show up, having time-travelled from the future, saying "We were just fighting some demons, when Wyatt's powers disappeared. So we thought we'd timetravel back to the point in time when this was caused." Wait... what? The logical consequence of 3-year-old Wyatt losing his powers would have been...that he has no powers at age 4, 5, 6 all the way up to 20 (and beyond that, for that matter). Or that they fix the problem and he regains his powers at 3 and keeps them till age 20. How the heck did his 20-year-old self have powers and then randomly lose them? Why not his 40-year-old self? There's no way this makes sense.
** Unless characters who have interacted with each other retain the same present in different times: for example the sisters have to plant the spell before the Chris who has just left them - not the one who only has the potential to be him - meets with the danger.
* In the third and final series of ''Series/AshesToAshes'', Alex's voiceover on the opening titles mentions time running out for her to get back home (i.e. to the present day). This isn't explained in the slightest, though, since neither world, now or then, is in any imminent danger whatsoever.
** Maybe explained by the finale.
* Justified in ''Series/{{Starstuff}},'' since time passes at the same rate on both sides of the communication link.
* Used a little in the ''Series/StargateSG1'' episode "[[Recap/StargateSG1S2E211969 1969]]". After SG-1 is sent back in time to the eponymous year due to a TeleporterAccident, we jump back to the present for a shot of an airman telling Gen. Hammond that the team is several hours overdue. Hammond tells the airman that there's nothing they can do to help our heroes. We remain with SG-1 for the remainder of the episode.
* ''Series/OnceUponATime'' uses this very heavily. Most episodes cut back and forth between events "now" (in Storybrooke, or one of the magical realms) and some part of the backstory, taking place in the Enchanted Forest before the curse sent them to Earth.

to:

* In ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'', the Rangers summon their [[HumongousMecha zords]] from the year 3000 when needed, and after a battle they return to the future. In one episode, the zords are damaged and have to be repaired This happens quite often in the future, preventing the Rangers from using them in the next episode. No explanation is given ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', being as to why they can't just summon the zords from 1000 years ''plus one week'' into the future, where they would be fully repaired.
** ''Series/PowerRangersSPD'' is implied to somehow run parallel to 2004, meaning that there was a year without monster attacks since the monsters were in 2025. There's no indication that ''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' followed ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'' without having SPD in the middle.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' does this whilst Hiro was in Feudal Era Japan, as well as when Peter is in the post-apocalyptic future.
** The UK DVD box [[LampshadeHanging actually says "Meanwhile, in Feudal Japan"]] in its episode synopsis for "Out of Time".
** The episode Brother's Keeper has a Meanwhile Eight Weeks Ago Where Time Is Stopped.
* In the ''Series/{{Lost}}'' episode "Because You Left," Daniel interacts
it deals with Desmond at some indeterminate point in the past. The next scene is Desmond suddenly remembering this conversation over three years later, with the implication that these events are in some way concurrent.
** On Lost, the past is immutable except for Desmond, so this is really weird regardless of when it updates. He's the only person who can alter the past, and he appears to stop paradoxes by having crappy memory. (Both of the past and sometimes of the future.) It is perhaps notable that the other person, Daniel, who attempts to alter the past (But can't, except when Desmond is involved.) also has crappy memory. In both cases, they don't remember things they should have remembered until after those things 'were caused' in the present. [[FridgeBrilliance Perhaps that's how reality protects itself on Lost.]] If you went back to try to 'alter the past', the past version of you just remember events incorrectly until you decide to 'alter' it, after which point you correctly remember the way it always was, so no one really changes anything.
** In a more direct example, Lost's fifth season takes place in two different times. One group of
characters are off the island in the "present" (2007), and another group is on the island, which is jumping through various time periods.
*** More recently, the season has been moving in the direction of reuniting the groups, though two old characters, along with a slew of new ones, are still stuck... in the future! On the whole, season five has shed the strict character-centric flashback/flashforward structure of previous seasons (the -forward part having been introduced [[spoiler:at the end of season three]]) in favor of more immediate ongoing plots in two time periods.
*** The Desmond interaction is possibly justified by the fact that he is jumping through time as well; perhaps a future Desmond shows up and recognizes Faraday.
** Notably, this device leads to a bit of FridgeLogic in "The Incident": there's no way they could have succeeded in [[spoiler:resetting time]], because the episode shows that everything is normal thirty years in the future.
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'':
** While a powerless Chris is fighting future Wyatt in the... well, future, the Charmed Ones write a spell that gives back powers and hastily hide it in the attic where Chris can find it. Why bother hurrying hiding a spell that Chris won't use until more than twenty years later?
** A demon steals 3-year-old Wyatt's powers. Shortly thereafter, twenty-or-so-year-old Chris and Wyatt show up, having time-travelled
from the future, saying "We were just fighting some demons, when Wyatt's powers disappeared. So we thought we'd timetravel back to the point in time when this was caused." Wait... what? The logical consequence of 3-year-old Wyatt losing his powers would have been...that he has no powers at age 4, 5, 6 all the way up to 20 (and beyond that, for that matter). Or that they fix the problem and he regains his powers at 3 and keeps them till age 20. How the heck did his 20-year-old self have powers and then randomly lose them? Why not his 40-year-old self? There's no way this makes sense.
** Unless characters who have interacted with each other retain the same present in different times: for example the sisters have to plant the spell before the Chris who has just left them - not the one who only has the potential to be him - meets with the danger.
* In the third and final series of ''Series/AshesToAshes'', Alex's voiceover on the opening titles mentions time running out for her to get back home (i.e. to
both the present day). This isn't explained in and the slightest, though, since neither world, now or then, future [[spoiler: (multiple futures, actually)]]. A notable example is in any imminent danger whatsoever.
** Maybe explained by
the finale.
* Justified in ''Series/{{Starstuff}},'' since time passes at the same rate on both sides of the communication link.
* Used a little in the ''Series/StargateSG1''
double episode "[[Recap/StargateSG1S2E211969 1969]]". After SG-1 is sent back featuring Jesse on her submarine in time to the eponymous year due to a TeleporterAccident, we jump back to future while Sarah and co. do their thing in the present for a shot of an airman telling Gen. Hammond that present, used to explain the team backstory behind [[spoiler: Catherine Weaver]].
* A key elements of ''Series/ThisIsUs''. This
is several hours overdue. Hammond tells the airman that there's nothing they can do to help our heroes. We remain revealed with SG-1 for a WhamLine at the remainder end of the episode.
* ''Series/OnceUponATime'' uses this very heavily. Most episodes cut back and forth between events "now" (in Storybrooke, or one of the magical realms) and some part of the backstory, taking
first episode, where we learn that segments centering around two characters actually took place in the Enchanted Forest 30 years before the curse sent them to Earth.rest of the show.



* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' - The episode "Captain Jack Harkness", set in 1941/2008.
** Also played straight in the first episode of series two, "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang" with the conversation between Captains Jack and John, concerning the stat of the Time Agency, an agency which won't exist for several thousand years.
* In the 1980's version of ''Series/TwilightZone'', the episode "A Message From Charity" tells the story of an '80s teenage boy communicating with a teenage girl in Salem 300 years earlier, and [[spoiler:communicating what he found in a history book to save her from a lecherous "judge"]].



* A key elements of Series/ThisIsUs. This is revealed with a WhamLine at the end of the first episode, where we learn that segments centering around two character actually took place 30 years before the rest of the show.

to:

* A key elements of Series/ThisIsUs. This ''Series/TheXFiles'' episode "Triangle" is revealed with a WhamLine at split between modern-day shenanigans and the end events of the first episode, where we learn that segments centering around two character actually took place 30 years before the rest of the show.a doomed 30s cruise liner.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'' audio play:

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' audio play:plays:
7th Feb '17 5:35:48 PM Amahn
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** Similarly, ''Literature/StarTrekTheQContinum'' has Q take Picard on a journey through ''Q's'' life in order to show Picard why he should abandon his current mission. The trip through time is interspersed with chapters detailing what The Enterprise is going through under Richer's command in Picard's absence.

to:

** Similarly, ''Literature/StarTrekTheQContinum'' ''Literature/TheQContinuum'' has Q take Picard on a journey through ''Q's'' life in order to show Picard why he should abandon his current mission. The trip through time is interspersed with chapters detailing what The Enterprise is going through under Richer's command in Picard's absence.
7th Feb '17 5:35:02 PM Amahn
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Added DiffLines:

** Similarly, ''Literature/StarTrekTheQContinum'' has Q take Picard on a journey through ''Q's'' life in order to show Picard why he should abandon his current mission. The trip through time is interspersed with chapters detailing what The Enterprise is going through under Richer's command in Picard's absence.
This list shows the last 10 events of 111. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MeanwhileInTheFuture