History Main / MathematiciansAnswer

13th Jan '18 4:28:23 AM SeptimusHeap
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* Used to answer an actual math question in an episode of ''Main/LittleBear'' when Little Bear and Emily rope the 4 local {{Playful Otter}}s into playing school with them. After trying to teach them how to count, Emily asks the otters how many of them there are. They each answer "1" -- because "each of us is 1 otter!" There's a beat before Little Bear admits, "That's true..."

to:

* Used to answer an actual math question in an episode of ''Main/LittleBear'' ''Literature/LittleBear'' when Little Bear and Emily rope the 4 local {{Playful Otter}}s into playing school with them. After trying to teach them how to count, Emily asks the otters how many of them there are. They each answer "1" -- because "each of us is 1 otter!" There's a beat before Little Bear admits, "That's true..."
6th Jan '18 2:04:45 AM ArtistsAnomalous
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' "How did he die?" "Your contact? Not well."


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* ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay''
-->'''John Connor''': The police are here!
-->'''Sarah Connor''': How many?
-->'''John Connor''': All of them, I guess.
5th Jan '18 9:36:30 AM WillKeaton
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* ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' "How did he die?" "Your contact? Not well."
1st Jan '18 11:25:46 AM WillKeaton
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* ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay''
-->'''John Connor''': The police are here!
-->'''Sarah Connor''': How many?
-->'''John Connor''': All of them, I guess.
25th Dec '17 12:36:35 PM Malady
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-->"How are you going to ...?"
-->"Efficiently."

-->"What did you cut him with?"
-->"Something sharp."
* In ''Literature/TheWondrousLandOfOz'', Mombi tries this in an unsuccessful attempt to avoid Glinda's questions.

to:

-->"How are you going to ...?"
-->"Efficiently."

-->"What
?"\\
"Efficiently."\\
\\
"What
did you cut him with?"
-->"Something
with?"\\
"Something
sharp."
* In ''Literature/TheWondrousLandOfOz'', ''Literature/TheMarvelousLandOfOz'', Mombi tries this in an unsuccessful attempt to avoid Glinda's questions.



-->'''Ben:''' Where can I find the dragon?
-->'''Nightshade:''' Everywhere.

to:

-->'''Ben:''' Where can I find the dragon?
-->'''Nightshade:'''
dragon?\\
'''Nightshade:'''
Everywhere.



-->'''Penfold:''' You mean, we're lost?!
-->'''Danger Mouse:''' Nonsense, Penfold. If we were lost, we wouldn't know where we are. And ''we'' know we're ''here!'' Therefore, we can't be lost.

to:

-->'''Penfold:''' You mean, we're lost?!
-->'''Danger
lost?!\\
'''Danger
Mouse:''' Nonsense, Penfold. If we were lost, we wouldn't know where we are. And ''we'' know we're ''here!'' Therefore, we can't be lost.
25th Dec '17 11:32:00 AM ArtistsAnomalous
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A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."

to:

A third variant is when a "How?" question beginning with "How" (being asked (as in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") method?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding phrase, as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?").manner?". For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."
24th Dec '17 1:50:18 PM ArtistsAnomalous
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Added DiffLines:



Added DiffLines:

24th Dec '17 1:49:40 PM ArtistsAnomalous
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Examples include questions involving "can you do ''[favor]''...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you ''capable of'' doing ''[favor]''?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it. Just such an example is commonly used (often humorously) by teachers of linguistics and philosophy of language to illustrate conversational maxims. Imagine A asks B "Can you pass me the salt?" and B simply answers "Yes" and does not pass them the salt. The reason this kind of exchange is uncommon is that there is always an implicit level of meaning beyond the literal meaning, which is determined by implicit conventions. A supposedly knows that B is ''capable'' of passing the salt, and B knows that A knows this. Therefore, if B assumes that A is obeying a conversational maxim such as "Do not ask a question to which you already know the answer", they will interpret the question as a request to do something, rather than as a request for information. This is also a favorite of English teachers and {{Grammar Nazi}}s, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, ''can you''?" "Uh, '''may''' I come in?". Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, "Yes" as if it were a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in RealLife, especially in the world of computers). A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."

to:

Examples include questions involving "can you do ''[favor]''...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you ''capable of'' doing ''[favor]''?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it. Just such an example is commonly used (often humorously) by teachers of linguistics and philosophy of language to illustrate conversational maxims. Imagine A asks B "Can you pass me the salt?" and B simply answers "Yes" and does not pass them the salt. The reason this kind of exchange is uncommon is that there is always an implicit level of meaning beyond the literal meaning, which is determined by implicit conventions. A supposedly knows that B is ''capable'' of passing the salt, and B knows that A knows this. Therefore, if B assumes that A is obeying a conversational maxim such as "Do not ask a question to which you already know the answer", they will interpret the question as a request to do something, rather than as a request for information. This is also a favorite of English teachers and {{Grammar Nazi}}s, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, ''can you''?" "Uh, '''may''' I come in?".
Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, respond "Yes" as if it were a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in RealLife, especially in the world of computers). This occurs because a question of the form "Is the capital of Australia Melbourne or Canberra?" is ambiguous between "The capital of Australia is either Melbourne or Canberra. Which one is it?" and "Is the capital of Australia either Melbourne or Canberra?". A logician may misinterpret a question of the first kind as being one of the second, to the frustration of the person who asked the question.
A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."
24th Dec '17 10:25:48 AM ArtistsAnomalous
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Examples include questions involving "can you do ''[favor]''...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you ''capable of'' doing ''[favor]''?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it. Just such an example is commonly used (often humorously) by teachers of linguistics and philosophy of language to illustrate conversational maxims. Imagine A asks B "Can you pass me the salt?" and B simply answers "Yes" and does not pass them the salt. The reason this kind of exchange is uncommon is that there is always an implicit level of meaning beyond the literal meaning, which is determined by implicit conventions. A supposedly knows whether B is capable of passing the salt, and B knows that A knows this. If B assumes that A is obeying a conversational maxim such as "Do not ask a question to which you already know the answer", they will interpret the question as a request to do something, rather than as a request for information. This is also a favorite of English teachers and {{Grammar Nazi}}s, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, ''can you''?" "Uh, '''may''' I come in?". Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, "Yes" as if it were a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in RealLife, especially in the world of computers). A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."

to:

Examples include questions involving "can you do ''[favor]''...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you ''capable of'' doing ''[favor]''?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it. Just such an example is commonly used (often humorously) by teachers of linguistics and philosophy of language to illustrate conversational maxims. Imagine A asks B "Can you pass me the salt?" and B simply answers "Yes" and does not pass them the salt. The reason this kind of exchange is uncommon is that there is always an implicit level of meaning beyond the literal meaning, which is determined by implicit conventions. A supposedly knows whether that B is capable ''capable'' of passing the salt, and B knows that A knows this. If Therefore, if B assumes that A is obeying a conversational maxim such as "Do not ask a question to which you already know the answer", they will interpret the question as a request to do something, rather than as a request for information. This is also a favorite of English teachers and {{Grammar Nazi}}s, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, ''can you''?" "Uh, '''may''' I come in?". Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, "Yes" as if it were a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in RealLife, especially in the world of computers). A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."
24th Dec '17 10:15:54 AM ArtistsAnomalous
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Examples include questions involving "can you do ''[favor]''...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you ''capable of'' doing ''[favor]''?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it. Just such an example is commonly used (often humorously) by teachers of linguistics and philosophy of language to illustrate conversational maxims. Imagine A asks B 'Can you pass me the salt?' and B simply answers 'Yes' and does not pass them the salt. The reason this kind of exchange is uncommon is that there is always an implicit level of meaning beyond the literal meaning, which is determined by implicit conventions. A supposedly knows whether B is capable of passing the salt, and B knows that A knows this. If B assumes that A is obeying a conversational maxim such as 'do not ask a question to which you already know the answer', they will interpret the question as a request to do something, rather than a request for information. This is a favorite of English teachers and {{Grammar Nazi}}s, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, ''can you''?" "Uh, '''may''' I come in?". Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, "Yes" as if it were a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in RealLife, especially in the world of computers). A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."

to:

Examples include questions involving "can you do ''[favor]''...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you ''capable of'' doing ''[favor]''?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it. Just such an example is commonly used (often humorously) by teachers of linguistics and philosophy of language to illustrate conversational maxims. Imagine A asks B 'Can "Can you pass me the salt?' salt?" and B simply answers 'Yes' "Yes" and does not pass them the salt. The reason this kind of exchange is uncommon is that there is always an implicit level of meaning beyond the literal meaning, which is determined by implicit conventions. A supposedly knows whether B is capable of passing the salt, and B knows that A knows this. If B assumes that A is obeying a conversational maxim such as 'do "Do not ask a question to which you already know the answer', answer", they will interpret the question as a request to do something, rather than as a request for information. This is also a favorite of English teachers and {{Grammar Nazi}}s, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, ''can you''?" "Uh, '''may''' I come in?". Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, "Yes" as if it were a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in RealLife, especially in the world of computers). A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."
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