History Main / MarySueTopia

27th Jan '16 4:12:30 AM InsomniacWeasel
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* Fates Worse Than Death is an alternative cyberpunk game taking place in a setting in which humanity has (with very limited success) largely moved into these. With the invention of advanced brainscanning technology, it became possible to scientifically evaluate not just a person's real intelligent and talent, but also such qualities as their loyalty, morality, emotional stability and generosity. Following a series of world wars and economic crises which eroded humanity's faith in the older systems of government, this led to the creation of a world based around private communities. By using brainscanning technology, the rulers of each such community can guarantee that only people possessing the skills and personality traits they desire will be able to enter. In theory, this would create a global utopia: what could possibly go wrong in a community inhabited entirely by intelligent, altruistic, friendly people? The game goes to great lengths to show why this is wrong. For once, different people have different ideas of what a perfect personality is, and not all personality profiles are ideal for the maintenance of a community. Many "utopianist" communes are, in fact, dirt poor and in poor repair as people were selected to live in them based on such traits as their adherence to monogamy or ability to suppress emotions. Many are effectively cults, all are incredibly authoritarian (with regular brainscans to make sure people haven't "strayed from the path", and the threat of being kicked out in that case), most demand absolute conformity and a significant minority actively despise all other societies. Moreover, since many such communities emphasize independence, epitomized in the community's ability to become self-sufficient, many quickly regress into a barely industrial level of civilization as the tiny, "perfect" societies prove incapable of maintaining crucial, modern industries. Most importantly, the state of the world means that at any time, there's a large surplus of people who have not been found fitting for any nearby community: they are the mentally unstable, the inclined to violence, the drug addicted, the revolutionaries and individualists... and in this world, they are all packed into ghettos so as to not disturb the communities nearby. The game's default setting of Manhattan is one such ghetto, and it is repeatedly shown that for all of its grit and grime, the people there are generally both happier and more enlightened than the clean, smiling representatives of the nearby "utopias".
24th Jan '16 10:48:50 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Recently, though, other events have started to pull Wakanda away from this sort of depiction beyond what Priest has done. During ''Doomwar'', the collective force of the Black Panther, the ComicBook/FantasticFour, some of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} and {{Deadpool}} are only able to recollect about 5% of the vibranium Doctor Doom stole before T'Challa was forced to render the rest inert. Then came ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'' which had {{Namor}}, powered up on the Phoenix Force, flood Wakanda with a tidal wave, bringing it to absolute ruin.
to:
** Recently, though, other events have started to pull Wakanda away from this sort of depiction beyond what Priest has done. During ''Doomwar'', the collective force of the Black Panther, the ComicBook/FantasticFour, some of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} ComicBook/XMen and {{Deadpool}} SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}} are only able to recollect about 5% of the vibranium Doctor Doom stole before T'Challa was forced to render the rest inert. Then came ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'' which had {{Namor}}, [[ComicBook/SubMariner Namor]], powered up on the Phoenix Force, flood Wakanda with a tidal wave, bringing it to absolute ruin.
15th Jan '16 12:42:27 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The first ''Literature/WindOnFire'' book contains this ''and'' Straw Utopias. People in the dystopia take tests constantly to determine their aptitudes. Children -- even those only about a year old -- who misbehave in public are given demerits, which affect ''their entire families''' social status. The child who happens to live with an aunt rather than his parents is grubby and socially backward because "he has no one to tell him to wash". Repeat child offenders get sent to live with the "Old Children", even though being touched by one turns you into one of them and this is universally understood to be Not A Good Thing. The government officials basically state that they want to make life hard for the main characters, because obviously [[ViewersAreMorons the readers couldn't accept]] [[WellIntentionedExtremist Well-Intentioned Extremists]]. And yet... you have the chance to improve your status based on your own merits, and if you keep your head down and are good at memorizing the information on the standardized tests, you're pretty much left alone. The biggest problem with this government seems to be that it never considered that different people are competent in different areas. Oh, yeah, and that it doesn't accept that "We're only this way because the magic left! When these seven-year-olds bring it back, it will make everything ''all better''. Somehow."
to:
* The first ''Literature/WindOnFire'' book contains this ''and'' Straw Utopias. People in the dystopia take tests constantly to determine their aptitudes. Children -- even those only about a year old -- who misbehave in public are given demerits, which affect ''their entire families''' social status. The child who happens to live with an aunt rather than his parents is grubby and socially backward because "he has no one to tell him to wash". Repeat child offenders get sent to live with the "Old Children", even though being touched by one turns you into one of them and this is universally understood to be Not A Good Thing. The government officials basically state that they want to make life hard for the main characters, because obviously [[ViewersAreMorons the readers couldn't accept]] accept [[WellIntentionedExtremist Well-Intentioned Extremists]]. And yet... you have the chance to improve your status based on your own merits, and if you keep your head down and are good at memorizing the information on the standardized tests, you're pretty much left alone. The biggest problem with this government seems to be that it never considered that different people are competent in different areas. Oh, yeah, and that it doesn't accept that "We're only this way because the magic left! When these seven-year-olds bring it back, it will make everything ''all better''. Somehow."
9th Jan '16 6:58:28 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Not An Example. Their society is portrayed as hopelessly fragile, repressive, and corrupt.
* In ''Film/DemolitionMan'' San Angeles is simply unable to defend itself against violence anymore. It's almost a {{Deconstruction}} of the Mary Suetopia (to be more exact, it's a parody of ''Literature/BraveNewWorld''), showing how all it takes is one violent, crazy psychopath to tear the whole damn thing apart. Two. Two violent, crazy.... Three. Three violent, crazy psychopaths. One who [[SylvesterStallone knits]], one who [[Creator/DenisLeary needs a shower]], and one who's WesleySnipes.
31st Dec '15 3:21:05 AM CassandraLeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Subverted in Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas'', where Omelas starts out looking like a ridiculously perfect utopia, until we learn [[PoweredByAForsakenChild it hides a dark secret]]. Le Guin likes subverting this trope. Anarres in ''The Dispossessed'' also appears to be an example of this at first glance, but as we progress through the plot we learn that, while it is better in many ways than either of the dominant powers on Urras, it is still pretty damn flawed, and becoming worse.
to:
* Subverted in Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas'', ''Literature/TheOnesWhoWalkAwayFromOmelas'', where Omelas starts out looking like a ridiculously perfect utopia, until we learn [[PoweredByAForsakenChild it hides a dark secret]]. Le Guin likes subverting this trope. Anarres in ''The Dispossessed'' ''Literature/TheDispossessed'' also appears to be an example of this at first glance, but as we progress through the plot we learn that, while it is better in many ways than either of the dominant powers on Urras, it is still pretty damn flawed, and becoming worse.
31st Dec '15 3:10:15 AM CassandraLeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* One common interpretation of "Literature/HarrisonBergeron" by Creator/KurtVonnegut is that it's a ''deliberate'' example of one of these, as a StealthParody of similar works by Creator/AynRand and others.
28th Dec '15 1:23:51 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Recently, though, other events have started to pull Wakanda away from this sort of depiction beyond what Priest has done. During ''Doomwar'', the collective force of the Black Panther, the ComicBook/FantasticFour, some of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} and {{Deadpool}} are only able to recollect about 5% of the vibranium DoctorDoom stole before T'Challa was forced to render the rest inert. Then came ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'' which had {{Namor}}, powered up on the Phoenix Force, flood Wakanda with a tidal wave, bringing it to absolute ruin.
to:
** Recently, though, other events have started to pull Wakanda away from this sort of depiction beyond what Priest has done. During ''Doomwar'', the collective force of the Black Panther, the ComicBook/FantasticFour, some of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} and {{Deadpool}} are only able to recollect about 5% of the vibranium DoctorDoom Doctor Doom stole before T'Challa was forced to render the rest inert. Then came ''ComicBook/AvengersVsXMen'' which had {{Namor}}, powered up on the Phoenix Force, flood Wakanda with a tidal wave, bringing it to absolute ruin.
27th Dec '15 6:13:19 AM Hanz
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Parodied in the ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' Engineer update comic, where it's revealed that Australia became a hyper-masculine Gary Stu-topia at the pinnacle of technological progress thanks to the discovery of [[{{Unobtanium}} Australium]]. Even though the Australians were originally dumb, the Australium made them super-geniuses and allowed them to grow marvelous handlebar mustaches, even on women.
to:
* Parodied in the ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' Engineer update comic, where it's revealed that Australia became a hyper-masculine Gary Stu-topia at the pinnacle of technological progress thanks to the discovery of TestosteronePoisoning-inducing [[{{Unobtanium}} Australium]]. Even though the Australians were originally dumb, the Australium made them super-geniuses through and allowed them to grow marvelous handlebar mustaches, even on women.
6th Dec '15 9:29:31 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Chuck Sonnenberg AKA {{SFDebris}} ''lives'' on pointing out the flaws that the writers unintentionally wrote into the society. Especially in any episode that revolves around money or the Maquis.
to:
** Chuck Sonnenberg AKA {{SFDebris}} WebSite/SFDebris ''lives'' on pointing out the flaws that the writers unintentionally wrote into the society. Especially in any episode that revolves around money or the Maquis.
4th Dec '15 12:39:23 PM Nohbody
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Deconstructed by the ''Franchise/{{Bioshock}}'' series; the societies you find yourself wandering through were founded upon a single core philosophy (objectivism in ''VideoGame/BioShock1'', an anti-objectivist credo of absolute altruism in ''VideoGame/BioShock2'', and American exceptionalism in ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'') and did indeed start off as Mary Suetopias. By the time YOU show up, though, the religious adherence of their citizens to these philosophies have brought to light a few minor flaws therein; flaws which have forced the cities' founders to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the monsters they fought]] (a cruel irony they're all too aware of), and have caused society to crumble into a state of violent anarchy, the exception being ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite''... [[FromBadToWorse where it's pretty clear the founders STARTED as monsters.]]
to:
* Deconstructed by the ''Franchise/{{Bioshock}}'' ''VideoGame/BioShock'' series; the societies you find yourself wandering through were founded upon a single core philosophy (objectivism in ''VideoGame/BioShock1'', an anti-objectivist credo of absolute altruism in ''VideoGame/BioShock2'', and American exceptionalism in ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'') and did indeed start off as Mary Suetopias. By the time YOU show up, though, the religious adherence of their citizens to these philosophies have brought to light a few minor flaws therein; flaws which have forced the cities' founders to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the monsters they fought]] (a cruel irony they're all too aware of), and have caused society to crumble into a state of violent anarchy, the exception being ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite''... [[FromBadToWorse where it's pretty clear the founders STARTED as monsters.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 543. Show all.