History Main / MagicalNegro

29th Jun '16 5:27:49 PM nombretomado
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* Jim from ''HuckleberryFinn'' is a nice subversion. While he is Black, and into magic, it doesn't Flanderize him and certainly isn't portrayed typically. Bonus points for averting HollywoodVoodoo.

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* Jim from ''HuckleberryFinn'' ''Literature/HuckleberryFinn'' is a nice subversion. While he is Black, and into magic, it doesn't Flanderize him and certainly isn't portrayed typically. Bonus points for averting HollywoodVoodoo.
21st Jun '16 7:33:05 PM gman992
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** When asked by {{Playboy}} why he/Hollywood does that, King replied, "white liberal guilt."
9th Jun '16 11:04:40 PM WickedIcon
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* ''[[Franchise/StarWars Star Wars Saga]]:'' Mace Windu.
7th Jun '16 2:18:37 PM __Vano
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This can work somewhat as AnAesop about tolerance and not dismissing individuals from underprivileged groups, and it's certainly an improvement on earlier tendencies to either never depict minority characters at all or portray them as villains or idiots. However, ultimately it's usually a moral and artistic shortcut, replacing a genuine moral message with a well-intentioned but patronizing homage to the special gifts of the meek. Minority characters still all too often aren't portrayed as the heroes of their own stories, but as helpers of standard white, able-bodied, middle-class heroes, and they aren't depicted as, you know, actual ''people'' with their own desires, flaws and character arcs, but as mystical, CloserToEarth plot devices. If taken far enough, [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop it may send the message that minorities don't have any problems of own]], nor get frustrated in times of trouble.
5th Jun '16 11:30:05 AM vtarira
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* Inverted in ''Film/DjangoUnchained'', with Dr. King Schultz taking the traditional magical negro role.

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* Inverted in ''Film/DjangoUnchained'', with the escaped slave Django in the lead and the white Dr. King Schultz taking in a mentor role that hits every beat of the traditional magical negro role.standard Magical Negro plot arc.
24th Apr '16 2:15:29 AM KenKevinStriker
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* Uncle Remus from ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'' epitomizes this trope, a key reason why the movie isn't seen much today. Even the horrors of Jim Crow can't dampen his determination to be a cheerful mentor to white children.

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* Uncle Remus from ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'' epitomizes this trope, a key reason why the movie isn't seen much today. Even the horrors of Jim Crow can't dampen his determination to be a cheerful mentor to white for the children.
15th Apr '16 2:26:18 PM MasoTey
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* Ancash in ''Literature/AutobiographyOfRed'' has shades of this, being a quechuaphone Peruvian who serves up traditional wisdom for the benefit of the anglophone North American protagonist.
21st Mar '16 10:10:29 AM phoenixy
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* ''Film/WalkHard'': the Dewey Cox Story. Drummer Sam played by Tim Meadows introduces Dewey to various drugs, saying "You don't want no part of this shit". He also introduces Dewey in the film’s prologue saying to a TV producer: “You’ll have to give him a moment, son; Dewey Cox has to think about his entire life before he plays.’
5th Mar '16 2:45:24 PM nombretomado
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* ''ComicBook/WhatIf ... CaptainAmerica Fought In [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar The Civil War]]?'' reduces ComicBook/TheFalcon to a cross between a MagicalNegro and a MagicalNativeAmerican (in this version he was raised by the Shawnee tribe and became a shaman). He gives Steve Rogers a [[WhoopiEpiphanySpeech speech about seeing the similarities in people]], uses his [[ReligionIsMagic mystic abilities]] to give Steve superpowers, and then gets killed.

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* ''ComicBook/WhatIf ... CaptainAmerica ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Fought In [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar The Civil War]]?'' reduces ComicBook/TheFalcon to a cross between a MagicalNegro and a MagicalNativeAmerican (in this version he was raised by the Shawnee tribe and became a shaman). He gives Steve Rogers a [[WhoopiEpiphanySpeech speech about seeing the similarities in people]], uses his [[ReligionIsMagic mystic abilities]] to give Steve superpowers, and then gets killed.
2nd Mar '16 2:02:39 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''HowToKillAMockingbird'' jokingly portrays Calpurnia this way.

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* ''HowToKillAMockingbird'' ''WebAnimation/HowToKillAMockingbird'' jokingly portrays Calpurnia this way.
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