History Main / MadeInCountryX

25th Apr '18 7:24:07 AM costanton11
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* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch "All Things Scottish", starring MikeMyers. Their slogan: "If it's not Scottish, it's '''CRAP!'''"

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* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch "All Things Scottish", starring MikeMyers.Creator/MikeMyers. Their slogan: "If it's not Scottish, it's '''CRAP!'''"
21st Apr '18 3:13:51 PM Malady
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** ''TheSimpsons'' seems to like this gag. In another episode, when Homer is shopping for a new car and looking at [[TheAllegedCar a particularly crappy one]], he asks the salesman what country it was made in, only to be told that said country no longer exists. This was more of a specific jab at the Yugo than at foreign products in general, though.

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** ''TheSimpsons'' seems They seem to like this gag. In another episode, when Homer is shopping for a new car and looking at [[TheAllegedCar a particularly crappy one]], he asks the salesman what country it was made in, only to be told that said country no longer exists. This was more of a specific jab at the Yugo than at foreign products in general, though.
21st Apr '18 3:13:03 PM Malady
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* In an episode of ''TheSimpsons'', Marge is in a store looking at a set of kitchen knives. When she notices that the label says "Made in USA", she decides against buying it.

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* In an episode of ''TheSimpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Marge is in a store looking at a set of kitchen knives. When she notices that the label says "Made in USA", she decides against buying it.
21st Apr '18 2:24:40 PM Glide08
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* Something that is true almost universally: any product, made in any country, will have at least a few defenders in that country on the basis of simple [[PatrioticFervor national pride]], no matter the quality. In TheEighties, American automakers frequently appealed to patriotism and supporting American workers as selling points in the face of stiff competition from the Japanese, with Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca so famous for his America-boosting that, for a time, there was serious talk of him running for President. Locally-grown foods also feature heavily in how a country, state, or region crafts its image; witness the pride that the French take in their wine, that Floridians take in their oranges, that Georgians (No, not [[UsefulNotes/GeorgiaCountry those Georgians...]]) take in their peaches, and that Idahoans take in their potatoes. This also factors into [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Import_substitution_industrialization import substitution industrialization]], where a government supports domestic businesses with the intent of reducing reliance on imports; while its effectiveness as an economic policy is mixed, it holds nationalist appeal for many politicians.

to:

* Something that is true almost universally: any product, made in any country, will have at least a few defenders in that country on the basis of simple [[PatrioticFervor national pride]], no matter the quality. In TheEighties, American automakers frequently appealed to patriotism and supporting American workers as selling points in the face of stiff competition from the Japanese, with Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca so famous for his America-boosting that, for a time, there was serious talk of him running for President. Locally-grown foods also feature heavily in how a country, state, or region crafts its image; witness the pride that the French take in their wine, that Floridians take in their oranges, that Georgians (No, not [[UsefulNotes/GeorgiaCountry [[UsefulNotes/GeorgiaEurope those Georgians...]]) take in their peaches, and that Idahoans take in their potatoes. This also factors into [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Import_substitution_industrialization import substitution industrialization]], where a government supports domestic businesses with the intent of reducing reliance on imports; while its effectiveness as an economic policy is mixed, it holds nationalist appeal for many politicians.
21st Apr '18 2:24:14 PM Glide08
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* Something that is true almost universally: any product, made in any country, will have at least a few defenders in that country on the basis of simple [[PatrioticFervor national pride]], no matter the quality. In TheEighties, American automakers frequently appealed to patriotism and supporting American workers as selling points in the face of stiff competition from the Japanese, with Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca so famous for his America-boosting that, for a time, there was serious talk of him running for President. Locally-grown foods also feature heavily in how a country, state, or region crafts its image; witness the pride that the French take in their wine, that Floridians take in their oranges, that Georgians take in their peaches, and that Idahoans take in their potatoes. This also factors into [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Import_substitution_industrialization import substitution industrialization]], where a government supports domestic businesses with the intent of reducing reliance on imports; while its effectiveness as an economic policy is mixed, it holds nationalist appeal for many politicians.

to:

* Something that is true almost universally: any product, made in any country, will have at least a few defenders in that country on the basis of simple [[PatrioticFervor national pride]], no matter the quality. In TheEighties, American automakers frequently appealed to patriotism and supporting American workers as selling points in the face of stiff competition from the Japanese, with Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca so famous for his America-boosting that, for a time, there was serious talk of him running for President. Locally-grown foods also feature heavily in how a country, state, or region crafts its image; witness the pride that the French take in their wine, that Floridians take in their oranges, that Georgians (No, not [[UsefulNotes/GeorgiaCountry those Georgians...]]) take in their peaches, and that Idahoans take in their potatoes. This also factors into [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Import_substitution_industrialization import substitution industrialization]], where a government supports domestic businesses with the intent of reducing reliance on imports; while its effectiveness as an economic policy is mixed, it holds nationalist appeal for many politicians.
7th Apr '18 11:42:47 AM borgjones
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** American warplanes, powered by British engines.
** American cargo planes and passenger liners likewise. For the former, the Douglass line (especially the DC-3) had an unbeatable record, while Boeing remained the uncontested gold standard for the latter until the very end of the 20th century.

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** American warplanes, powered by British engines.
** American cargo planes and passenger liners likewise. For the former, the Douglass Douglas line (especially the DC-3) had an unbeatable record, while Boeing remained the uncontested gold standard for the latter until the very end of the 20th century.
15th Mar '18 6:00:29 AM Jappus
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* Before Apple, it was Japanese {{cell phone}}s that held this reputation during the TurnOfTheMillennium, equipped with audio/video playback (including broadcast TV and radio), video cameras, 3G mobile broadband, instant messaging, email, UsefulNotes/{{MP3}} players, GPS navigation, and e-money services at a time when most Western cell phones (save for a few niche devices like the business-oriented [=BlackBerry=] and the youth-focused Danger Hiptop/T-Mobile Sidekick) stopped at text messaging and still cameras. Needless to say, Japanese ''keitai'' were a ForbiddenFruit for many Western cell phone users. Unfortunately, they wound up being ''too'' advanced to run on the primitive cellular networks outside Japan, and so Japanese cell phone makers turned inward and focused on the domestic market almost entirely, allowing them to get caught completely off-guard by the smartphone revolution. The unique qualities of Japanese cell phones, and how they failed to catch on outside Japan, led to the term [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gal%C3%A1pagos_syndrome "Galápagos syndrome"]] to describe it.

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* Before Apple, it was Japanese {{cell phone}}s that held this reputation during the TurnOfTheMillennium, equipped with audio/video playback (including broadcast TV and radio), video cameras, 3G mobile broadband, instant messaging, email, UsefulNotes/{{MP3}} players, GPS navigation, and e-money services at a time when most Western cell phones (save for a few niche devices like the business-oriented [=BlackBerry=] and the youth-focused Danger Hiptop/T-Mobile Sidekick) stopped at text messaging and still cameras. Needless to say, Japanese ''keitai'' were a ForbiddenFruit for many Western cell phone users. Unfortunately, they wound up being ''too'' advanced to run on the primitive cellular networks outside Japan, and so Japanese cell phone makers turned inward and focused on the domestic market almost entirely, allowing them to get caught completely off-guard by the smartphone revolution. The unique qualities of Japanese cell phones, and how they failed to catch on outside Japan, led to the term [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gal%C3%A1pagos_syndrome org/wiki/Galapagos_syndrome "Galápagos syndrome"]] to describe it.
10th Mar '18 12:21:35 PM nombretomado
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*** And now Chrysler is trying to invoke and invert this, starting with an ad spot featuring Music/{{Eminem}} during the 2011 SuperBowl: 'Imported from Detroit'.

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*** And now Chrysler is trying to invoke and invert this, starting with an ad spot featuring Music/{{Eminem}} during the 2011 SuperBowl: UsefulNotes/SuperBowl: 'Imported from Detroit'.
24th Feb '18 1:46:57 PM nombretomado
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* In one ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode where Brian befriends RushLimbaugh and moves in with him, Brian buys Rush a whole new kitchen comprising of all American made appliances. Each one collapses, fails or explodes the moment Brian mentions them.

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* In one ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode where Brian befriends RushLimbaugh Radio/RushLimbaugh and moves in with him, Brian buys Rush a whole new kitchen comprising of all American made appliances. Each one collapses, fails or explodes the moment Brian mentions them.
18th Feb '18 8:08:12 PM thatother1dude
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' episode "The Console" is about Gumball receiving a "Game Child", a [[ShoddyKnockoffProduct knockoff so shoddy]] ''the country it was made in'' is also a knockoff ("Chainor"). Turns out, like everything else from [[TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday the Awesome Store]], it's an ArtifactOfDoom that [[TrappedInTVLand turns Elmore into a video game]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' episode ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball''
** Not about "quality" in the usual sense, but "The Wicked" has a bit where Gumball reads a tag on Margaret Robinson (a very evil {{muppet}} woman) which says she is "made in the fiery pits of the underworld".
**
"The Console" is about Gumball receiving a "Game Child", a [[ShoddyKnockoffProduct knockoff so shoddy]] ''the country it was made in'' is also a knockoff ("Chainor"). Turns out, like everything else from [[TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday the Awesome Store]], it's an ArtifactOfDoom that [[TrappedInTVLand turns Elmore into a video game]].
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