History Main / LowFantasy

21st Jan '17 6:31:57 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Pigskin'' takes place in a "Seventh Century A.D." where Vikings battle barbarian hordes on the English countryside for no determinable reason or purpose. Historical accuracy is definitely not the point.

to:

* ''Pigskin'' takes place in a "Seventh Century A.D." where Vikings battle barbarian hordes on the English countryside for no determinable reason or purpose.purpose, with trolls sometimes joining either or both sides. Historical accuracy is definitely not the point.
10th Jan '17 11:11:06 AM TGR
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange'' fits both the literary and gaming definition of low fantasy. While the central drama revolves around the fantasy element of Max's time travel powers, the rest of the drama stems from realistic scenarios dealing with real world issues.
14th Dec '16 12:04:12 AM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* While not gritty or cynical in the slightest (just the opposite, really), the ''{{Atelier}}'' series of games tend to have many of the other marks of Low Fantasy. In the earlier (and Japan-exclusive) games especially, the setting is dominated by humans, there is very little blatant magic (most "magical effects" are at least manufactured by the alchemist heroes of the games, often with recipes that have at least a little grounding in actual science), and the setting of the games only encompasses a single country or principality (on purpose, as the protagonist is working in a time limit and typically is running a business anyway, and doesn't have time to go casually WalkingTheEarth). The ''Atelier Iris'' sub-series, which did make it to America, has received some criticism for moving away from most or all of these elements; ''Mana Khemia'' and Atelier games on the DS, ''Liese'' and ''Annie'', have brought the Low Fantasy elements back to the forefront to at least some degree, with ''VideoGame/{{Atelier Rorona|The Alchemist of Arland}}'' deliberately going back to it full-force.

to:

* While not gritty or cynical in the slightest (just the opposite, really), the ''{{Atelier}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series of games tend to have many of the other marks of Low Fantasy. In the earlier (and Japan-exclusive) games especially, the setting is dominated by humans, there is very little blatant magic (most "magical effects" are at least manufactured by the alchemist heroes of the games, often with recipes that have at least a little grounding in actual science), and the setting of the games only encompasses a single country or principality (on purpose, as the protagonist is working in a time limit and typically is running a business anyway, and doesn't have time to go casually WalkingTheEarth). The ''Atelier Iris'' sub-series, which did make it to America, has received some criticism for moving away from most or all of these elements; ''Mana Khemia'' and Atelier games on the DS, ''Liese'' and ''Annie'', have brought the Low Fantasy elements back to the forefront to at least some degree, with ''VideoGame/{{Atelier Rorona|The Alchemist of Arland}}'' deliberately going back to it full-force.
5th Dec '16 7:46:26 PM sgamer82
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[LightNovel/HaiToGensouNoGrimgar Grimgar of Fantasy and Ash]]'': a group of young Japanese teenagers [[YouWakeUpInARoom awaken in the world of Grimgar]] with no memory of how they got there. Magic is largely limited to minor healing, some sword skills, and a few dark-based spells that inflict minor status ailments. Combat is brutal and savage: many of the battles our main party gets into are far more reminiscent of UrbanWarfare of the likes seen in [[TheWarOnTerror Fallujah]] as goblins take full advantage of buildings and town architecture to ambush and snipe from [[labelnote:*]]Episode 8's battle strongly resembles a contemporary room-clearing exercise you would expect a modern special forces unit to do, starting off with picking off the enemy sniper and sentry, then stacking up to do a door breach and fighting for every square inch of the building's interior[[/labelnote]]. The goblins so far are the only non-human race, and the question of how "evil" they are is implicitly asked as they are clearly intelligent creatures who enjoy games and playing with small animals. And even all this, fighting is only a small part of life in Grimgar: much of the time, the characters are living in a much more mundane fashion by doing things such as washing clothes, cooking meals, and paying for daily living expenses.

to:

* ''[[LightNovel/HaiToGensouNoGrimgar Grimgar of Fantasy and Ash]]'': a ''LightNovel/GrimgarOfFantasyAndAsh'': A group of young Japanese teenagers [[YouWakeUpInARoom awaken in the world of Grimgar]] with no memory of how they got there. Magic is largely limited to minor healing, some sword skills, and a few dark-based spells that inflict minor status ailments. Combat is brutal and savage: many of the battles our main party gets into are far more reminiscent of UrbanWarfare of the likes seen in [[TheWarOnTerror Fallujah]] as goblins take full advantage of buildings and town architecture to ambush and snipe from [[labelnote:*]]Episode 8's battle strongly resembles a contemporary room-clearing exercise you would expect a modern special forces unit to do, starting off with picking off the enemy sniper and sentry, then stacking up to do a door breach and fighting for every square inch of the building's interior[[/labelnote]]. The goblins so far are the only non-human race, and the question of how "evil" they are is implicitly asked as they are clearly intelligent creatures who enjoy games and playing with small animals. And even all this, fighting is only a small part of life in Grimgar: much of the time, the characters are living in a much more mundane fashion by doing things such as washing clothes, cooking meals, and paying for daily living expenses.
13th Nov '16 5:30:34 AM ergeis
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/TacticsOgre'': There are magic users, demons and zombies but the main bulk of the story is about a royal secession crisis and a nation torn apart by factionalism.
22nd Oct '16 7:37:30 AM Grobi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* While the amount of Low and High Fantasy elements fluctuates wildly between individual installments, the ''VideoGame/{{Gothic}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Risen}}'' games generally fit into this quite nicely. Every major character is jaded and melancholic, and the general point of the games is often some personal goal like escaping a PenalColony or reclaiming your stolen humanity (even though you may save the world in the process, it's never your main motivation). Magic exists, but isn't widespread with the only practitioners being either arrogant high mages or morally questionable Necromancers and Voodoo Priests. ''Gothic 3'' even implies that, since magic comes from the gods, it actually might be a corrupting, evil force after all. And even though there is another humanoid race - the [[OurOrcsAreDifferent Orcs]] - their only true difference to humans seems to be the worship of a different god, a simple difference in philosophy.
19th Sep '16 7:41:50 AM Asgar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' series, the vast majority of characters are human, and conflicts are between human factions, with fantasy creatures usually portrayed as rare or legendary. In addition, most characters are non-magic-users, including almost all of the protagonists. Also, the games focus more on political maneuvering and grand strategy than typical fantasy quests.

to:

* In the ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' series, the vast majority of characters are human, and conflicts are between human factions, with fantasy creatures usually portrayed as rare or legendary. In addition, most characters are non-magic-users, including almost all of the protagonists. While there are plenty of mages as well, their powers are mostly limited to hurting or healing things, not manipulating cosmic forces. Also, the games focus more on political maneuvering and grand strategy than typical fantasy quests.
26th Jun '16 1:54:56 AM LFGamer
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

The Low Fantasy Gaming RPG defines the low fantasy gaming genre as low magic, with an emphasis on magic being not only rare, but also dark and inherently dangerous. Every time a spell is cast, the caster must check for a Dark & Dangerous magic effect https://lowfantasygaming.com/2016/05/29/dark-dangerous-magic/
23rd May '16 6:17:30 AM JeffTheCat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/TheSilverEye'': The only magic that remains are a few cursed objects from the time of the Nedarians. Melete is the only Nedarian alive and the only one who can generate curses. Descendants of Nedarians (like the Hollingsworths and the Shephards), have a tiny bit of magic that allow their [[KaleidoscopeEyes eyes to change colors]] and their hands to catch on fire, but that's just about it.
3rd May '16 10:59:20 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' is a pretty mundane story about the adventures of a super-intelligent little girl growing up in an uncaring family and surviving at an abusive elementary school. The only supernatural element that appears is [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], which is apparently just a side effect of Matilda being a genius without an outlet for her mental abilities.
This list shows the last 10 events of 129. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LowFantasy