History Main / LongHairIsFeminine

13th Jun '18 3:14:13 PM intastiel
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* In ''Webcomic/TrippingOverYou'', this is a point of contention between Liam, who likes to grow his hair out, and his father Eli, who thinks it's unmasculine. Fortunately, Eli drops the unpleasant "makes you look like a poof" comments after [[spoiler:Liam comes out of the closet]].
13th Jun '18 8:22:46 AM erracht
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* In the 1920s, this trope received a major subversion in mainstream fashion from which it didn't fully recover for decades. As part of the radical new look of that decade, bobbed hair, often worn jaw-length or shorter, became all the rage. At first very daring, it quickly became so popular that within a few years, outside certain cultures and demographics, most women had bobbed hair. Long hair continued to be worn and appreciated by some[[note]]Fashion-acceptable alternatives to the bob in the 1920s included twisting long hair into a bob-like shape, bobbing the hair in front and wearing the rest of it up, or wearing the hair in a very sleek, very neat low bun.[[/note]] but the average woman of that time had short hair (though still typically longer than most men). In the 1930s, fashionable hairstyles got longer, but were still basically short- to medium-length, heavily styled bobs. Moderately long hair experienced something of a revival in the 1940s, though it tended to be styled in a way that reduced the overall length of the hairstyle; by the time of Christian Dior's New Look, long hair was common enough that Dior's models were routinely being photographed with it in a bun. However, shorter styles were back for the 1950s, even among teenage girls, often tightly curled and with short bangs. It took until well into the 1960s for really long hair to become a feminine ideal again.[[note]]Many period movies set in some of these decades don't quite get the hairstyles of the time quite right, including having a disproportionate number of actresses with long hair. This may be a result of FashionDissonance, but also due to the fact that many period hairstyles require labor-intensive hairdressing techniques that are no longer commonly practiced.[[/note]]

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* In the 1920s, this trope received a major subversion in mainstream fashion from which it didn't fully recover for decades. As part of the radical new look of that decade, bobbed hair, often worn jaw-length or shorter, became all the rage. At first very daring, it quickly became so popular that within a few years, outside certain cultures and demographics, most women had bobbed hair. Long hair continued to be worn and appreciated by some[[note]]Fashion-acceptable alternatives to the bob in the 1920s included twisting long hair into a bob-like shape, bobbing the hair in front and wearing the rest of it up, or wearing the hair in a very sleek, very neat low bun.[[/note]] but the average woman of that time had short hair (though still typically longer than most men). In the 1930s, fashionable hairstyles got longer, but were still basically short- to medium-length, heavily styled bobs. Moderately long hair experienced something of a revival in the 1940s, though it tended to be styled in a way that reduced the overall length of the hairstyle; by the time of Christian Dior's New Look, long hair was common enough that Dior's models were routinely being photographed with it in a bun. However, shorter styles were back for the 1950s, even among teenage girls, often tightly curled and with short bangs. It took until well into the 1960s for really long hair to become a feminine ideal again.[[note]]Many period movies set in some of these decades don't quite get the hairstyles of the time quite right, including having a disproportionate number of actresses with long hair. This may be a result of FashionDissonance, but also due to the fact that many period hairstyles require labor-intensive hairdressing techniques that are no longer commonly practiced.[[/note]]
12th Jun '18 10:58:22 PM erracht
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* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty.[[note]] Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework.[[/note]] Examples include the wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.

to:

* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, in many cultures and times, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty.[[note]] Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework.[[/note]] Examples include the wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today. today.
* In the 1920s, this trope received a major subversion in mainstream fashion from which it didn't fully recover for decades. As part of the radical new look of that decade, bobbed hair, often worn jaw-length or shorter, became all the rage. At first very daring, it quickly became so popular that within a few years, outside certain cultures and demographics, most women had bobbed hair. Long hair continued to be worn and appreciated by some[[note]]Fashion-acceptable alternatives to the bob in the 1920s included twisting long hair into a bob-like shape, bobbing the hair in front and wearing the rest of it up, or wearing the hair in a very sleek, very neat low bun.[[/note]] but the average woman of that time had short hair (though still typically longer than most men). In the 1930s, fashionable hairstyles got longer, but were still basically short- to medium-length, heavily styled bobs. Moderately long hair experienced something of a revival in the 1940s, though it tended to be styled in a way that reduced the overall length of the hairstyle; by the time of Christian Dior's New Look, long hair was common enough that Dior's models were routinely being photographed with it in a bun. However, shorter styles were back for the 1950s, even among teenage girls, often tightly curled and with short bangs. It took until well into the 1960s for really long hair to become a feminine ideal again.[[note]]Many period movies set in some of these decades don't quite get the hairstyles of the time quite right, including having a disproportionate number of actresses with long hair. This may be a result of FashionDissonance, but also due to the fact that many period hairstyles require labor-intensive hairdressing techniques that are no longer commonly practiced.[[/note]]
12th Jun '18 9:57:58 PM erracht
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* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty.[[note]] Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework.]] Examples include the wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.[[/note]]

to:

* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty.[[note]] Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework.]] [[/note]] Examples include the wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.[[/note]] today.
12th Jun '18 9:55:53 PM erracht
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* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty. [[note Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework.]] Examples include the wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.

to:

* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty. [[note [[note]] Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework.]] Examples include the wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today. [[/note]]
12th Jun '18 8:19:33 PM erracht
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* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty. [[note: of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework]] Examples include the wimples veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.

to:

* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty. [[note: of [[note Of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework]] housework.]] Examples include the wimples wimples, veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.
12th Jun '18 8:05:24 PM erracht
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Added DiffLines:

* During much of history, in the Western world and elsewhere, long hair on women was ubiquitous to the point of being, to a greater or lesser extent, virtually an EnforcedTrope (not that there weren't exceptions but some form of long hair was pretty much the feminine norm). Ironically, women, at least adult or married women, were expected to put their hair up or even cover it in many cultures and times for reasons of modesty. [[note: of course, it could also be seen as a matter of practicality, especially as long hair can get in the way of e.g. housework]] Examples include the wimples veils and hoods that are seen in many paintings of Medieval and early Renaissance women, the Victorian expectation that a girl would start wearing her hair up around the time when she reached marriagable age, and the Muslim hijab, which many women still practice today.
11th Apr '18 2:10:07 AM Cifer
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** Nitori is a [[{{transsexual}} transgender]] girl who likes baking and is quite feminine. Almost every time she envisions herself living as a girl she has long hair past her shoulders. Her hair is cropped short but she buys a long haired wig, when she starts going out as a girl. She ends up growing her hair into a bob in middle school but won't grow it further due to social acceptance issues with boys and long hair. [[spoiler:In high school she cuts it even shorter originally and buys a new wig, this time a bob]].

to:

** Nitori is a [[{{transsexual}} transgender]] {{transgender}} girl who likes baking and is quite feminine. Almost every time she envisions herself living as a girl she has long hair past her shoulders. Her hair is cropped short but she buys a long haired wig, when she starts going out as a girl. She ends up growing her hair into a bob in middle school but won't grow it further due to social acceptance issues with boys and long hair. [[spoiler:In high school she cuts it even shorter originally and buys a new wig, this time a bob]].



* In the ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' story "A Game of You", the [[{{Transsexual}} transwoman]] Wanda has long red hair that, according to her friend Barbie, she is rather proud of. [[spoiler: When she dies, her family, who never accepted her as a woman, have her buried with short hair as part of their erasure of her female identity.]]

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* In the ''ComicBook/TheSandman'' story "A Game of You", the [[{{Transsexual}} transwoman]] [[{{Transgender}} trans woman]] Wanda has long red hair that, according to her friend Barbie, she is rather proud of. [[spoiler: When she dies, her family, who never accepted her as a woman, have her buried with short hair as part of their erasure of her female identity.]]
28th Feb '18 3:05:30 PM XFllo
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** Nitori is a [[{{transsexual}} transgender]] girl who likes baking and is quite feminine. Almost every time she envisions herself living as a girl she has long hair past her shoulders. Her hair is cropped short but she buys a long haired wig, when she starts going out as a girl. She ends up growing her hair into a BobHaircut in middle school but won't grow it further due to social acceptance issues with boys and long hair. [[spoiler:In high school she cuts it even shorter originally and buys a new wig, this time a bob]].

to:

** Nitori is a [[{{transsexual}} transgender]] girl who likes baking and is quite feminine. Almost every time she envisions herself living as a girl she has long hair past her shoulders. Her hair is cropped short but she buys a long haired wig, when she starts going out as a girl. She ends up growing her hair into a BobHaircut bob in middle school but won't grow it further due to social acceptance issues with boys and long hair. [[spoiler:In high school she cuts it even shorter originally and buys a new wig, this time a bob]].
25th Feb '18 6:40:35 PM Pichu-kun
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* TuftOfHeadFur\\
For less anthropomorphic animals, fur is used as a counterpart to hair. Hair tufts on females contrast with "bald" males, giving the allusion of hair.
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