History Main / KlingonPromotion

21st Dec '17 1:33:12 PM Premonition45
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** In ''Film/TheLastJedi'', Kylo Ren takes Rey to Supreme Leader Snoke, [[IfYoureSoEvilEatThisKitten who orders him to kill her to show his devotion to the Dark Side]]. Instead, [[spoiler:Kylo kills Snoke using the confiscated Skywalker lightsaber to slice him in half and makes himself the new Supreme Leader.]]
19th Dec '17 8:06:11 AM GothicNarcissus
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** House Bolton, House Frey and [[spoiler: House Tarly]]betray their liege lords to seize their former titles.

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** House Bolton, House Frey and [[spoiler: House Tarly]]betray Tarly]] betray their liege lords to seize their former titles.
19th Dec '17 8:05:42 AM GothicNarcissus
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** House Bolton and House Frey betray their liege lords to seize their former titles.

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** House Bolton and Bolton, House Frey betray and [[spoiler: House Tarly]]betray their liege lords to seize their former titles.
14th Dec '17 9:12:36 PM Theriocephalus
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** ChronicBackstabbingDisorder must run in the family - quite some time later, after Eggman's reorganized the Legion into his Dark Egg Legion with Lien Da's ancestor Dimitri as Grandmaster, she eventually double crosses him too and leaves him for dead so that she can become Grandmaster again.
** And Dr. Robotnik, before he became the BigBad, was the head of the Kingdom of Acorn's military - a job he got by throwing the previous holder of the title into the Zone of Silence (not murder, but [[AFateWorseThanDeath close enough]]). And when he took over the Kingdom, he jump started his coup by doing the same to the King.

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** ChronicBackstabbingDisorder must run in the family - -- quite some time later, after Eggman's reorganized the Legion into his Dark Egg Legion with Lien Da's ancestor Dimitri as Grandmaster, she eventually double crosses him too and leaves him for dead so that she can become Grandmaster again.
** And Dr. Robotnik, before he became the BigBad, was the head of the Kingdom of Acorn's military - -- a job he got by throwing the previous holder of the title into the Zone of Silence (not murder, but [[AFateWorseThanDeath close enough]]). And when he took over the Kingdom, he jump started his coup by doing the same to the King.



--> '''Saul''': "The practice of apprentice killing mentor is not limited to Dark Jedi. I fully expect you to kill me once you are settled in, but I'll have the comfort of knowing I have a competent officer running things - which is more than I can say for my current crop of groveling idiots."

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--> '''Saul''': "The practice of apprentice killing mentor is not limited to Dark Jedi. I fully expect you to kill me once you are settled in, but I'll have the comfort of knowing I have a competent officer running things - -- which is more than I can say for my current crop of groveling idiots."



* Deconstructed with the minotaurs of ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}''. The accepted way to become the minotaur emperor is to defeat the previous emperor in a duel. However, an Imperial Duel is an ''incredibly'' formalized affair, the incumbent emperor can ignore challenges if he wants to (though doing this too often/ignoring a challenger with a strong enough reputation will quickly earn an emperor a reputation for cowardice and/or corruption, not a good thing for the leader of a ProudWarriorRace to have) and if the emperor is killed ''outside'' of an Imperial Duel, that's assassination and isn't well-regarded. Doesn't hurt that the emperor's main job is to be a sterling example of minotaur values for the people to look up to and be inspired by - though he sets policy in a broad sense, most of the day-to-day running of the empire is carried out by the bureaucracy.

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* Deconstructed with the minotaurs of ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}''. The accepted way to become the minotaur emperor is to defeat the previous emperor in a duel. However, an Imperial Duel is an ''incredibly'' formalized affair, the incumbent emperor can ignore challenges if he wants to (though doing this too often/ignoring a challenger with a strong enough reputation will quickly earn an emperor a reputation for cowardice and/or corruption, not a good thing for the leader of a ProudWarriorRace to have) and if the emperor is killed ''outside'' of an Imperial Duel, that's assassination and isn't well-regarded. Doesn't hurt that the emperor's main job is to be a sterling example of minotaur values for the people to look up to and be inspired by - -- though he sets policy in a broad sense, most of the day-to-day running of the empire is carried out by the bureaucracy.



* Among the [[SorcerousOverlord Magelords]] of the ''Mageworlds'' series, ritual dueling is SeriousBusiness, with the victor gaining authority over the loser along with the loser's rank and titles, if they hold any (duels between high-ranking Mages are often to the death considering how high the stakes can be, but if one combatant is skilled enough to subdue the other without killing them, that works too). However, it's made explicitly clear that such duels are ''very'' formal, and must be officially declared, carried out in front of witnesses, and conducted according to strict standards of honorable combat - a breach of any of the above, the duel's results aren't valid and no power changes hands. This serves as a plot point several times in the third book.

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* Among the [[SorcerousOverlord Magelords]] of the ''Mageworlds'' series, ritual dueling is SeriousBusiness, with the victor gaining authority over the loser along with the loser's rank and titles, if they hold any (duels between high-ranking Mages are often to the death considering how high the stakes can be, but if one combatant is skilled enough to subdue the other without killing them, that works too). However, it's made explicitly clear that such duels are ''very'' formal, and must be officially declared, carried out in front of witnesses, and conducted according to strict standards of honorable combat - -- a breach of any of the above, the duel's results aren't valid and no power changes hands. This serves as a plot point several times in the third book.



** The twist however is, that any noble who survives can report the murders. Which usually leads to ''every'' other noble clan teaming up against the offenders to punish their "crimes". As a result, attacks on the castles of noble families rarely leave [[YouKilledMyFather any survivors]]. But drow are opportunistic bastards, so in the days and weeks following the "mysterious disappearance" of an entire clan, there are frequently some [[CousinOliver Cousin Oliver]]s appearing in "random" other families.
** Drow princess Liriel Baenre actually discusses this system (and drow society in general) with a couple of curious surface dwellers in the novel ''Windwalker''. She uses the example of a renowned master swordsmith and an up-and-coming rival, and notes that there are two accepted ways for the younger smith to get the older one's position - he can genuinely dedicate himself to becoming more skilled (which usually takes years of effort, planning, and more than a little magic) or he can kill the other smith (which ''also'' usually takes years of effort, planning, and more than a little magic). Liriel notes that although the stereotypical image of drow is that they would prefer the second way, in actual practice that's not always the case.

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** The twist however is, that any noble who survives can report the murders. Which usually leads to ''every'' other noble clan teaming up against the offenders to punish their "crimes". As a result, attacks on the castles of noble families rarely leave [[YouKilledMyFather any survivors]]. But drow are opportunistic bastards, so in the days and weeks following the "mysterious disappearance" of an entire clan, there are frequently some [[CousinOliver Cousin Oliver]]s {{Cousin Oliver}}s appearing in "random" other families.
** Drow princess Liriel Baenre actually discusses this system (and drow society in general) with a couple of curious surface dwellers in the novel ''Windwalker''. She uses the example of a renowned master swordsmith and an up-and-coming rival, and notes that there are two accepted ways for the younger smith to get the older one's position - -- he can genuinely dedicate himself to becoming more skilled (which usually takes years of effort, planning, and more than a little magic) or he can kill the other smith (which ''also'' usually takes years of effort, planning, and more than a little magic). Liriel notes that although the stereotypical image of drow is that they would prefer the second way, in actual practice that's not always the case.



*** Druids worked similarly in AD&D. There were only a limited number of a druids of higher rank in the world at any given time; to advance past a certain level, you would have to seek out and kill[[note]]or defeat in some other manner; the loser goes down a level[[/note]] a higher ranking druid. The highest rank - the Great Druid, of which there is only one - usually abdicated his position after some years rather than being killed by another druid. Presumably once you get to that position, you see the writing on the wall. Of course, then the Great Druid gains a level and becomes a hierophant who's not beholden to the druidic order anymore.
*** Monks in 1st Ed AD&D also followed this system - it kicked in quite early in the level progression, with there being only one monk of every level above 8th. It should be noted that in contrast to the evil Assassins, druid and monk promotions both allowed for a non-lethal victory.
* The Ork hierarchy in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' tends to work this way, ditto the Dark Eldar: if you succeed in killing the previous Warboss/Archite, the former officeholder clearly didn't deserve the job.

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*** Druids worked similarly in AD&D. There were only a limited number of a druids of higher rank in the world at any given time; to advance past a certain level, you would have to seek out and kill[[note]]or defeat in some other manner; the loser goes down a level[[/note]] a higher ranking druid. The highest rank - -- the Great Druid, of which there is only one - -- usually abdicated his position after some years rather than being killed by another druid. Presumably once you get to that position, you see the writing on the wall. Of course, then the Great Druid gains a level and becomes a hierophant who's not beholden to the druidic order anymore.
*** Monks in 1st Ed AD&D also followed this system - -- it kicked in quite early in the level progression, with there being only one monk of every level above 8th. It should be noted that in contrast to the evil Assassins, druid and monk promotions both allowed for a non-lethal victory.
* The Ork hierarchy in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' tends to work this way, ditto the Dark Eldar: if you succeed in killing the previous Warboss/Archite, the former officeholder clearly didn't deserve the job.



*** The way the game was originally designed, during the moment where Gradenko or later Zhukov gets killed, instead they would be fighting to the death. A pistol conviently lands in front of you. And then, you got to choose who to shoot - Stalin? Or Gradenko. This opens many worms since Gradenko was an Alliance defector.

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*** The way the game was originally designed, during the moment where Gradenko or later Zhukov gets killed, instead they would be fighting to the death. A pistol conviently lands in front of you. And then, you got to choose who to shoot - Stalin? Or -- Stalin or Gradenko. This opens many worms since Gradenko was an Alliance defector.



* GodOfWar4 reveals that [[spoiler:Kratos ascended to godhood again (against his will, interestingly) by killing all the Greek gods and then killing the final remaining god - himself]]. Once again, one of the worst successors possible.

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* GodOfWar4 reveals that [[spoiler:Kratos ascended to godhood again (against his will, interestingly) by killing all the Greek gods and then killing the final remaining god - -- himself]]. Once again, one of the worst successors possible.



* ''VideoGame/MiddleEarthShadowOfMordor'': This game deals with [[AlwaysChaoticEvil classic stereotypical orcs]]. Of COURSE you're going to see this on a regular weekly basis. Can work for or against you - in order to benefit from this trope, you need to look for opportunities to defeat enemy warchiefs whose lieutenants are under your command, while defending warchiefs whose aspiring lieutenants are not under your command. Having lieutenants under your control is vital to this process.

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* ''VideoGame/MiddleEarthShadowOfMordor'': This game deals with [[AlwaysChaoticEvil classic stereotypical orcs]]. Of COURSE you're going to see this on a regular weekly basis. Can work for or against you - -- in order to benefit from this trope, you need to look for opportunities to defeat enemy warchiefs whose lieutenants are under your command, while defending warchiefs whose aspiring lieutenants are not under your command. Having lieutenants under your control is vital to this process.



** This also comes with a bit of LoopholeAbuse in that you don't have to actually fight the Rak'shir duel yourself to rank up - so long as someone above you dies, you rise in rank, even if you weren't the one throwing down the gauntlet. [[ManipulativeBastard Alarak]] exploited this in the fluff to jump to First Ascendant ([[TheDragon the position directly under the Tal'darim leader, the Highlord]]) by setting up a Rak'shir duel between the previous First Ascendant and the Highlord where everyone above him in rank got killed.

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** This also comes with a bit of LoopholeAbuse in that you don't have to actually fight the Rak'shir duel yourself to rank up - -- so long as someone above you dies, you rise in rank, even if you weren't the one throwing down the gauntlet. [[ManipulativeBastard Alarak]] exploited this in the fluff to jump to First Ascendant ([[TheDragon the position directly under the Tal'darim leader, the Highlord]]) by setting up a Rak'shir duel between the previous First Ascendant and the Highlord where everyone above him in rank got killed.



** Mainly for this reason, there's a rather small proportion of Roman emperors whose sons succeeded them. At least once, there were six separate claimants to the imperial throne - with a few exceptions, no matter what kind of crisis the empire might be in you could generally count on there being someone else who was trying to get on top.

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** Mainly for this reason, there's a rather small proportion of Roman emperors whose sons succeeded them. At least once, there were six separate claimants to the imperial throne - -- with a few exceptions, no matter what kind of crisis the empire might be in you could generally count on there being someone else who was trying to get on top.
14th Dec '17 9:10:40 PM Theriocephalus
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'': In the UnderwaterCity of Ahmas, where society is essentially a giant gladiatorial arena, the most expedient way of becoming king is often to fight and kill the previous king, as the current monarch did when he took the throne.
14th Dec '17 6:22:20 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'': [[spoiler: Lucius eventually kills Baron Von Strucker (after drugging him for the means to control the Winter Soldier) and seizes control of HYDRA by force.]]

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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'': [[spoiler: Lucius eventually kills Baron Von Strucker (after drugging him for the means to control the Winter Soldier) and seizes control of HYDRA by force.]]
6th Dec '17 1:40:55 PM Xtifr
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* ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'' has a few short stories that show this as the inevitable conclusion of working at the Laundry, a vast entity of the civil service that no one's allowed to leave (mainly because of [[CosmicHorrorStory their line of work]]). It's dead man's shoes all the way up, and some folks underneath take pains to vacate the shoes of the one above them...

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* ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'' ''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'' has a few short stories that show this as the inevitable conclusion of working at the Laundry, a vast entity of the civil service that no one's allowed to leave (mainly because of [[CosmicHorrorStory their line of work]]). It's dead man's shoes all the way up, and some folks underneath take pains to vacate the shoes of the one above them...
1st Dec '17 8:15:33 AM Prfnoff
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* The game ''Star Trek: Klingon Academy'' deals with the potential consequences of this: The Klingon Empire circa the sixth movie was having a decline in quality commanders because people who were skilled in dueling but not in running a starship kept ending up in senior positions through this trope, so General Chang created a command school to train junior officers in shiphandling.

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* The game ''Star Trek: Klingon Academy'' ''VideoGame/StarTrekKlingonAcademy'' deals with the potential consequences of this: The Klingon Empire circa the sixth movie was having a decline in quality commanders because people who were skilled in dueling but not in running a starship kept ending up in senior positions through this trope, so General Chang created a command school to train junior officers in shiphandling.
19th Nov '17 1:30:19 PM Gamermaster
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* ''Webcomic/{{Drowtales}}: Princess Snadhya'rune and her sisters killed their mother by forming a demon-summoning group on the outskirts of the Drow capital Chel, sending it in open war on the city, and burying their mother alive during the chaos while pinning the blame on the one sister who stayed loyal. The sisters used body doubles of the queen to rule from the lesser thrones, but they argue over actual policy. They've been fighting for the queen's throne ever since.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Drowtales}}: ''Webcomic/{{Drowtales}}'': Princess Snadhya'rune and her sisters killed their mother by forming a demon-summoning group on the outskirts of the Drow capital Chel, sending it in open war on the city, and burying their mother alive during the chaos while pinning the blame on the one sister who stayed loyal. The sisters used body doubles of the queen to rule from the lesser thrones, but they argue over actual policy. They've been fighting for the queen's throne ever since.
19th Nov '17 9:17:28 AM Gamermaster
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* In ''Anime/Katekyo Hitman Reborn!'' Squalo takes over the Varia by engaging in an epic swordfight with, and eventually beheading, the former Head. [[spoiler: Squalo cuts off his own dominant hand before the fight and wins while exhausted from blood-loss.]] The Varia promptly proclaim the fourteen-and-a-half year old the new Head of the Varia. About a week later he ups and gives it to Xanxus.

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* In ''Anime/Katekyo Hitman Reborn!'' ''Anime/KatekyoHitmanReborn'' Squalo takes over the Varia by engaging in an epic swordfight with, and eventually beheading, the former Head. [[spoiler: Squalo cuts off his own dominant hand before the fight and wins while exhausted from blood-loss.]] The Varia promptly proclaim the fourteen-and-a-half year old the new Head of the Varia. About a week later he ups and gives it to Xanxus.
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