History Main / ItRunsOnNonsensoleum

12th Sep '16 2:01:49 AM MinisterOfSinister
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*** This is typified in their most common upgrade to any vehicles' speed: they paint them red, because "[[LawOfChromaticSuperiority da red wuns go fasta]]!" So while the real reason is that Orks have tremendous PsychicPowers, their explanations fit this trope perfectly.

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*** ** This is typified in their most common upgrade to any vehicles' speed: they paint them red, because "[[LawOfChromaticSuperiority da red wuns go fasta]]!" So while the real reason is that Orks have tremendous PsychicPowers, their explanations fit this trope perfectly.



** It should be noted that this varies wildly DependingOnTheWriter. For example, in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts novels, the eponymous commissar has no problems commandeering an ork buggy beyond the fact that it was designed for a significantly stronger being and as such lacks power steering. Another example is that of a unit of Ork-hunter Imperial Guard who will often loot Ork guns and use them, again with no problems. The general idea is that Ork technology works, and the Orks' psychic power simply makes it work ''better''. This interpretation is supported by the rules for TabletopGame/RogueTrader, which presents stats for an Ork gun that is exceedingly unreliable and prone to jams, but runs far more smoothly than it ought to in the hands of an Ork.

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** It should be noted that this varies wildly DependingOnTheWriter. For example, in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts novels, the eponymous commissar has no problems commandeering an ork Ork buggy beyond the fact that it was designed for a significantly stronger being and as such lacks power steering. Another example is that of a unit of Ork-hunter Imperial Guard who will often loot Ork guns and use them, again with no problems. The general idea is that Ork technology works, and the Orks' psychic power simply makes it work ''better''. This interpretation is supported by the rules for TabletopGame/RogueTrader, which presents stats for an Ork gun that is exceedingly unreliable and prone to jams, but runs far more smoothly than it ought to in the hands of an Ork.
9th Sep '16 12:24:25 AM DougSMachina
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There's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "hard" science fiction]], which adheres only to what is currently known or theorized. And then there's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "soft" science fiction]], which usually either offers little to no explanation beyond "it's a time machine!/ray gun!/clone!, etc", or makes use of TechnoBabble, which is when the writer gives a reason that sounds science-ish and expects WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief to take care of the rest. But there is some science fiction, usually on the "softest" end of the scale, that deliberately uses what is obviously nonsensical science, with no illusions about the audience ever taking it as anything but a joke. It may explain the scientific principles on which the [[AppliedPhlebotinum phlebotinum]] works, but the principles are so outlandish that the audience has to shrug and say, "[[RuleOfFunny it's comedy]]".

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There's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "hard" science fiction]], which adheres only to what is currently known or theorized. And then there's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "soft" science fiction]], which usually either offers little to no explanation beyond "it's a time machine!/ray gun!/clone!, etc", or makes use of TechnoBabble, which is when the writer gives a reason that sounds science-ish and expects trusts the WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief to take care of the rest. But there is some science fiction, usually on the "softest" end of the scale, that deliberately uses what is obviously nonsensical science, with no illusions about the audience ever taking it as anything but a joke. It may explain the scientific principles on which the [[AppliedPhlebotinum phlebotinum]] works, but the principles are so outlandish that the audience has to shrug and say, "[[RuleOfFunny it's comedy]]".
27th Aug '16 3:04:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''DragonTails'' with [[http://dragon-tails.com/comics/archive.php?date=010911 Bluey's Science Explained]].
* ''TheLifeOfNobTMouse'' is built on this trope. Characters are not born, they just appear. There's a city built on a giant wodge of putty plugging a hole in the universe where the Big Bang happened. Waving a jelly on a stick with pink-icing buns stuck on it will summon a letterbox that lets you ''post yourself to another universe''. The list goes on and on.

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* ''DragonTails'' ''Webcomic/DragonTails'' with [[http://dragon-tails.com/comics/archive.php?date=010911 Bluey's Science Explained]].
* ''TheLifeOfNobTMouse'' ''Webcomic/TheLifeOfNobTMouse'' is built on this trope. Characters are not born, they just appear. There's a city built on a giant wodge of putty plugging a hole in the universe where the Big Bang happened. Waving a jelly on a stick with pink-icing buns stuck on it will summon a letterbox that lets you ''post yourself to another universe''. The list goes on and on.



* ''AnsemRetort'': time travel is achieved through binge-drinking. Neither why nor how is ever coherently explained. [[FridgeBrilliance Because everyone's too drunk to give a coherent explanation.]]

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* ''AnsemRetort'': ''Webcomic/AnsemRetort'': time travel is achieved through binge-drinking. Neither why nor how is ever coherently explained. [[FridgeBrilliance Because everyone's too drunk to give a coherent explanation.]]
13th Aug '16 4:22:20 AM Morgenthaler
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** It should be noted that this varies wildly DependingOnTheWriter. For example, in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts novels, the eponymous commissar has no problems commandeering an ork buggy beyond the fact that it was designed for a significantly stronger being and as such lacks power steering. Another example is that of a unit of Ork-hunter Imperial Guard who will often loot Ork guns and use them, again with no problems. The general idea is that Ork technology works, and the Orks' psychic power simply makes it work ''better''. This interpretation is supported by the rules for RogueTrader, which presents stats for an Ork gun that is exceedingly unreliable and prone to jams, but runs far more smoothly than it ought to in the hands of an Ork.

to:

** It should be noted that this varies wildly DependingOnTheWriter. For example, in one of the Gaunt's Ghosts novels, the eponymous commissar has no problems commandeering an ork buggy beyond the fact that it was designed for a significantly stronger being and as such lacks power steering. Another example is that of a unit of Ork-hunter Imperial Guard who will often loot Ork guns and use them, again with no problems. The general idea is that Ork technology works, and the Orks' psychic power simply makes it work ''better''. This interpretation is supported by the rules for RogueTrader, TabletopGame/RogueTrader, which presents stats for an Ork gun that is exceedingly unreliable and prone to jams, but runs far more smoothly than it ought to in the hands of an Ork.
28th Jul '16 1:59:46 AM DougSMachina
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There's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "hard" science fiction]], which adheres only to what is currently known or theorized. And then there's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "soft" science fiction]], which usually either offers little to no explanation beyond "it's a time machine!/ray gun!/clone!, etc", or makes use of TechnoBabble, which is when the writer throws gibberish at you and expects WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief to take care of the rest. But there is some science fiction, usually on the "softest" end of the scale, that deliberately uses what is obviously nonsensical science, with no illusions about the audience ever taking it as anything but a joke. It may explain the scientific principles on which the [[AppliedPhlebotinum phlebotinum]] works, but the principles are so outlandish that the audience has to shrug and say, "[[RuleOfFunny it's comedy]]".

to:

There's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "hard" science fiction]], which adheres only to what is currently known or theorized. And then there's [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness "soft" science fiction]], which usually either offers little to no explanation beyond "it's a time machine!/ray gun!/clone!, etc", or makes use of TechnoBabble, which is when the writer throws gibberish at you gives a reason that sounds science-ish and expects WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief to take care of the rest. But there is some science fiction, usually on the "softest" end of the scale, that deliberately uses what is obviously nonsensical science, with no illusions about the audience ever taking it as anything but a joke. It may explain the scientific principles on which the [[AppliedPhlebotinum phlebotinum]] works, but the principles are so outlandish that the audience has to shrug and say, "[[RuleOfFunny it's comedy]]".
23rd Jul '16 6:14:14 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/KryptoTheSuperdog'', tiny aliens land on Earth to refuel their spaceship, the fuel in question being ''sugar''. (And they're rather sickened to discover humans ''eat'' what is their equivalent of gasoline.)
27th Jun '16 2:50:38 PM Morgenthaler
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** Creator/AlanMoore played with this in ''ComicBook/TomorrowStories'', where kid supergenius Jack B. Quick buttered cats to create antigravity devices. His parents quickly reminded him, however, that the cat would eventually lick off the butter and fall, which they did just in time to fall on the [[ShoutOut mutated pigs]] who had had a [[AnimalFarm Communist revolution]].

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** Creator/AlanMoore played with this in ''ComicBook/TomorrowStories'', where kid supergenius Jack B. Quick buttered cats to create antigravity devices. His parents quickly reminded him, however, that the cat would eventually lick off the butter and fall, which they did just in time to fall on the [[ShoutOut mutated pigs]] who had had a [[AnimalFarm [[Literature/AnimalFarm Communist revolution]].
13th Jun '16 10:36:40 PM Whitewings
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* There have been cases of people inventing things, such as extremely heat resistant paint, working from "theories" which bear no resemblance at all to actual scientific fact. The inventions work, but the inventor's explanations are pure example of this trope.
20th May '16 3:04:03 PM Shishkahuben
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** In one episode, [[MadScientist Dr. Doofenshmirtz]] [[ItMakesSenseInContext accidentally teleports a house full of people into his pants.]] Confused as to why his teleporter had that option, he realizes he mixed its wheel's setting up with his dry-cleaning wheel... which raises the question of why he has a dry-cleaning wheel.
-->'''Doofenshmirtz''' (talking for the wheel): I am a dry-cleaning wheel. Why do I exist?


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** James Woods is, at one point, seemingly KilledOffForReal but than turns up again later. When asked for an explanation he gives an absurd and laughably insane explanation involving a woman's soul being transferred into his body to sustain him. It [[CloudCuckooLander fits perfectly with the character]].


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* ''TheSimpsons'' episode "Don't Fear the Roofer", near the end. In the story, Homer gets his new friend Ray Magini to fix his roof. However, other people soon begin to postulate that Ray doesn't actually exist, since everyone who was with Homer when he spoke to Ray claimed not to have actually seen him. Thinking that Homer is delusional, his family takes him to the doctor, and after several treatments of painful therapy, Homer thinks he's back to sanity again. But then they find out that Ray was real all along, and that there were logical explanations as to why no one else saw him -- except for one case where Bart couldn't see Ray even though he was in plain sight and should have been able to. Guest star StephenHawking then shows up and delivers the trope -- a miniature black hole had appeared between Bart and Ray that absorbed the light from Ray so Bart couldn't see him.
** It also helps that Bart's was the only scenario with an obvious explanation in the first place. The building supplies piled in his arms would have obstructed Ray from his view. Of course that would be too easy.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'', [[ThoseTwoGuys Flem and Earl]] were seemingly stranded in the middle of an ocean, [[ClipShow reminiscing on memories]] that didn't actually happen. In the end, it turns out they were stuck in their bathtub the entire time, suffering from "[[RuleOfFunny Steam Induced Amnesia]]."
** Which is then lampshaded, as the Red Guy demonstrates it to the audience by intentionally breathing in steam which causes him to lose his memory and suddenly think he's Amelia Earhart.
17th Apr '16 1:48:16 AM Morgenthaler
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** John Rogers, one of the film's writers, is a physics major. The writers were entirely aware that what they were proposing was ludicrously incorrect, but deliberately patterned TheCore in the style of a 60's Science Hero movie; it's not realism that's important, it's verisimilitude. It's also worth mentioning that the craft was originally written to have a windshield, and that there were ''dinosaurs'' in one of the earlier scripts[[note]]A ShoutOut to ''Journey To The Center Of the Earth'', which posited that there was a prehistoric landscape inside the Earth's center.[[/note]]

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** John Rogers, one of the film's writers, is a physics major. The writers were entirely aware that what they were proposing was ludicrously incorrect, but deliberately patterned TheCore ''The Core'' in the style of a 60's Science Hero movie; it's not realism that's important, it's verisimilitude. It's also worth mentioning that the craft was originally written to have a windshield, and that there were ''dinosaurs'' in one of the earlier scripts[[note]]A ShoutOut to ''Journey To The Center Of the Earth'', which posited that there was a prehistoric landscape inside the Earth's center.[[/note]]
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