History Main / InternationalPopSongEnglish

16th Aug '15 3:42:40 PM nombretomado
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It's neither [[AmericanAccents American]] nor [[BritishAccents British]], nor any other dialect of English. If you start out as a pop singer in a non-English-speaking country, it's the way you learn to pronounce song lyrics and possibly English words in general - because that's what plays on the radio. If you choose to use an actual dialect or accent instead, no matter whether it's your own or a different one, you avert this trope.

to:

It's neither [[AmericanAccents [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents American]] nor [[BritishAccents British]], nor any other dialect of English. If you start out as a pop singer in a non-English-speaking country, it's the way you learn to pronounce song lyrics and possibly English words in general - because that's what plays on the radio. If you choose to use an actual dialect or accent instead, no matter whether it's your own or a different one, you avert this trope.
6th May '14 7:05:16 PM WoolieWool
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* The word "me" is frequently pronounced homonymously with "May". The same vowel may less commonly be altered in other words.

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* The word "me" long E sound is frequently pronounced homonymously with "May". The same changed from a high to a mid or even low vowel may less commonly be altered in other words.
("me" becomes "may"). Lower vowels are easier to sing (larger passage for air to flow through), especially at a high pitch or volume.
23rd Sep '12 12:51:07 PM IronLion
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to:

\n\n* The word "me" is frequently pronounced homonymously with "May". The same vowel may less commonly be altered in other words.
2nd Aug '12 2:21:26 PM troacctid
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2nd Aug '12 2:20:31 PM troacctid
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''As this is an OmnipresentTrope, there's no need to post examples here. You are encouraged to list this trope on the respective artists' pages, though.''

to:

''As this is an OmnipresentTrope, there's no need to post examples here. You are encouraged to list this trope on the respective artists' pages, though.''

17th Mar '12 7:48:49 AM doubleyouteeeff
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* The "o" in "gone", "body" etc. is pronounced as in General American (lower tongue position and long).

to:

* The "o" in "gone", "lot", "body" etc. is pronounced as in General American (lower tongue position and long).long, like "palm").


Added DiffLines:

* The vowel in "caught", "walk", etc. is either diphthongized to sound like the one in "mouth" or merged with "lot".
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