History Main / InjunCountry

29th Jun '16 5:26:39 PM nombretomado
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* ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' ends with our protagonist announcing that it is his intention to move out here and have a hollerin' good time with the Injuns. In the TV series ''The New Adventures of HuckleberryFinn'', he actually ends up in ''India''.

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* ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' ''Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' ends with our protagonist announcing that it is his intention to move out here and have a hollerin' good time with the Injuns. In the TV series ''The New Adventures of HuckleberryFinn'', Huckleberry Finn'', he actually ends up in ''India''.
13th Jun '16 12:31:16 AM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/{{Prey}}'' stars a ''badass'' Indian protagonist who doesn't believe in his tribe's teachings, but with the help of a near-death experience and a spirit journey to his grandfather gains the ability to escape his worldly body and cheat death.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Prey}}'' ''VideoGame/Prey2006'' stars a ''badass'' Indian protagonist who doesn't believe in his tribe's teachings, but with the help of a near-death experience and a spirit journey to his grandfather gains the ability to escape his worldly body and cheat death.
26th Apr '16 2:02:06 PM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

* The movies based on the stories of Creator/KarlMay (see under literature) were little better in that regard. Being [[CaliforniaDoubling shot in Croatia]] did little to help. The DefaWesterns inspired by the West-German Karl May movies at least tried to portray real historic characters and events, but were not shot anywhere close to the real US either, for obvious reasons.[[note]] The DEFA being an East German company during the cold war and all[[/note]]
26th Apr '16 1:58:07 PM Jhonny
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* The works of 19th century writer Literature/KarlMay are the uber-example of this trope for anyone who learned to read in German as a kid. Despite never having been to the then still Wild West himself[[note]] presumably because he spent several years in prison for fraud[[/note]], he wrote vivid first-person accounts of "his" encounters with NobleSavage Apache Literature/{{Winnetou}}.

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* The works of 19th century writer Literature/KarlMay Creator/KarlMay are the uber-example of this trope for anyone who learned to read in German as a kid. Despite never having been to the then still Wild West himself[[note]] presumably because he spent several years in prison for fraud[[/note]], he wrote vivid first-person accounts of "his" encounters with NobleSavage Apache Literature/{{Winnetou}}.
26th Apr '16 1:57:37 PM Jhonny
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* The works of 19th century writer Karl May are the uber-example of this trope for anyone who learned to read in German as a kid. Despite never having been to the then still Wild West himself[[note]] presumably because he spent several years in prison for fraud[[/note]], he wrote vivid first-person accounts of "his" encounters with NobleSavage Apache Literature/{{Winnetou}}.

to:

* The works of 19th century writer Karl May Literature/KarlMay are the uber-example of this trope for anyone who learned to read in German as a kid. Despite never having been to the then still Wild West himself[[note]] presumably because he spent several years in prison for fraud[[/note]], he wrote vivid first-person accounts of "his" encounters with NobleSavage Apache Literature/{{Winnetou}}.
29th Feb '16 12:04:13 PM Morgenthaler
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* In ''TheNewWorld'', the Virginian Powhatan tribe is portrayed, and they are much different from the standard Great Plains stereotype. Though ominous and warlike at first, they enjoy a much more favorable portrayal then the initial white settlers. The Powhatan are shown to be clean, fit, and prosperous, while the English fort is filthy and filled with sick, hideous, mean people. As the film goes on, however, Pocahontas learns to appreciate English culture as well, and she is enchanted by England when she visits it.

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* In ''TheNewWorld'', ''Film/TheNewWorld'', the Virginian Powhatan tribe is portrayed, and they are much different from the standard Great Plains stereotype. Though ominous and warlike at first, they enjoy a much more favorable portrayal then the initial white settlers. The Powhatan are shown to be clean, fit, and prosperous, while the English fort is filthy and filled with sick, hideous, mean people. As the film goes on, however, Pocahontas learns to appreciate English culture as well, and she is enchanted by England when she visits it.



* ''TheOutlawJoseyWales'' takes place in a revisionist Injun Country. The primary conflict is between white soldiers on opposite sides of the Civil War. Josey acquires an Indian companion who grouses about the white man but also subverts various stereotypes. While holed up in a ranch house that has been fortified against Indian attack, Josey has a heart-to-heart with the honorable chief of the local tribe to avoid a conflict with them.

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* ''TheOutlawJoseyWales'' ''Film/TheOutlawJoseyWales'' takes place in a revisionist Injun Country. The primary conflict is between white soldiers on opposite sides of the Civil War. Josey acquires an Indian companion who grouses about the white man but also subverts various stereotypes. While holed up in a ranch house that has been fortified against Indian attack, Josey has a heart-to-heart with the honorable chief of the local tribe to avoid a conflict with them.



* In ''{{Appaloosa}}'', the heroes chase the villains into Injun Country. When they're all attacked by a war band, the white folks all agree to a truce until they get out of Injun Country.

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* In ''{{Appaloosa}}'', ''Film/{{Appaloosa}}'', the heroes chase the villains into Injun Country. When they're all attacked by a war band, the white folks all agree to a truce until they get out of Injun Country.



* Hilariously lampooned in ''CannibalTheMusical'', where Alfred Packer and his party pass through a Ute settlement. All of the Native Americans are played by ''Japanese'' actors. There's even a scene showing the tribal warriors practicing their katas in front of teepees made from Japanese flags. The chief points out all the stereotypical aspects of their camp and dress to try to convince the whites that they're genuine.

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* Hilariously lampooned in ''CannibalTheMusical'', ''Film/CannibalTheMusical'', where Alfred Packer and his party pass through a Ute settlement. All of the Native Americans are played by ''Japanese'' actors. There's even a scene showing the tribal warriors practicing their katas in front of teepees made from Japanese flags. The chief points out all the stereotypical aspects of their camp and dress to try to convince the whites that they're genuine.
4th Dec '15 1:18:05 PM DoudechaChroma
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Unlike other settings, there is no common physical aspect to this trope, as RealLife American Indians are a diverse group that have lived in a variety of places, such as the lush forests of the Appalachian Highlands, the arid deserts of the Great Plains, and the Intermontane Plateaus of the west. Instead, Injun Country as used in media is a state of mind -- a place where the normal rules of the Civilized World do not apply, broached only by those daring enough to venture into the unknown.

The characterization of Injun Country has changed over the years. It began as a staple of TheWestern and tabloid entertainment, where American expansion brought white settlers into conflict with natives in TheWildWest. In these works, the American Indians were depicted as HollywoodNatives or [[TheSavageIndian bloodthirsty savages]], with a "primitive" lifestyle and the ever-present threat of a scalping. Sympathetic Indian characters were almost always [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy honorable brave]] collaborators with whites, while "[[MixedAncestry Half-Breed]]" characters could go either way

Today's portrayals of Injun Country have changed due to ValuesDissonance. While the landscape remains the same, frequently such revisionist works will depicted the natives as earthy {{Noble Savage}}s or {{Magical Native American}}s who lived in an [[{{Arcadia}} Edenic utopia]] before the White Man's arrival tore it all down. Though the Indians usually remained a threat to the heroes, they also acknowledge the injustices of the settlers.

An emerging variation can also be seen in present-day works set on modern indian reservations, TheRez, which are often shown as an awkward mix of lavish casinos and abject poverty. The contrast has become fodder for comedy and satire, and also leading to new character types, such as opportunistic Indian hucksters dazzling gullible visitors with fake rituals and spurious wisdom.

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Unlike other settings, there is no common physical aspect to this trope, as RealLife Native American Indians are a diverse group that have lived in a variety of places, such as the lush forests of the Appalachian Highlands, the arid deserts of the Great Plains, and the Intermontane Plateaus of the west. Instead, Injun Country as used in media is a state of mind -- a place where the normal rules of the Civilized World do not apply, broached only by those daring enough to venture into the unknown.

The characterization of Injun Country has changed over the years. It began as a staple of TheWestern and tabloid entertainment, where American expansion brought white settlers into conflict with natives in TheWildWest. In these works, the American Indians Native Americans were depicted as HollywoodNatives or [[TheSavageIndian bloodthirsty savages]], with a "primitive" lifestyle and the ever-present threat of a scalping. Sympathetic Indian Native characters were almost always [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy honorable brave]] collaborators with whites, while "[[MixedAncestry Half-Breed]]" characters could go either way

Today's portrayals of Injun Country have changed due to ValuesDissonance. While the landscape remains the same, frequently such revisionist works will depicted the natives as earthy {{Noble Savage}}s or {{Magical Native American}}s who lived in an [[{{Arcadia}} Edenic utopia]] before the White Man's arrival tore it all down. Though the Indians Natives usually remained a threat to the heroes, they also acknowledge the injustices of the settlers.

An emerging variation can also be seen in present-day works set on modern indian native reservations, TheRez, which are often shown as an awkward mix of lavish casinos and abject poverty. The contrast has become fodder for comedy and satire, and also leading to new character types, such as opportunistic Indian hucksters dazzling gullible visitors with fake rituals and spurious wisdom.
4th Dec '15 1:14:42 PM DoudechaChroma
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This is a {{Setting}} that broadly covers the locations where American Indians (also Red Indians, Native Americans, Amerinds, or [[CanadaEh First Nations]]) can be found.

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This is a {{Setting}} that broadly covers the locations where American Indians (also Red Indians, Native Americans, Amerinds, or Americans (also [[CanadaEh First Nations]]) can be found.
31st Oct '15 4:40:46 PM nombretomado
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* Little Plum is a comic strip in the [[BritishComics British Anthology Comic]] ''TheBeano'' is set in injun country with the strip mainly being about a young indian boy from the smellyfoot tribe. It is full of indian stereotypes and all the indian characters speak broken english which consists of normal english but with the word the being replaced with um.

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* Little Plum is a comic strip in the [[BritishComics British Anthology Comic]] ''TheBeano'' ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' is set in injun country with the strip mainly being about a young indian boy from the smellyfoot tribe. It is full of indian stereotypes and all the indian characters speak broken english which consists of normal english but with the word the being replaced with um.
18th Oct '15 5:47:36 PM nombretomado
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* The Saint of Killers' backstory in ''{{Preacher}}'' involves him rescuing a young woman from Injun Country. When she tells him about the horrible things they did, he tells her bluntly that they learned it from the whites. While in reality Native American tribes were no strangers to brutality, they did learn scalping from Europeans during the French and Indian War.

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* The Saint of Killers' backstory in ''{{Preacher}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'' involves him rescuing a young woman from Injun Country. When she tells him about the horrible things they did, he tells her bluntly that they learned it from the whites. While in reality Native American tribes were no strangers to brutality, they did learn scalping from Europeans during the French and Indian War.
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