History Main / InWhichATropeIsDescribed

13th Apr '17 2:08:16 AM Trying2CIt
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* Howard Pyle does this with his chapter names in his children's literature versions of ''Myth/RobinHood'' and ''Myth/KingArthur''.
29th Dec '16 12:35:50 AM Trying2CIt
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A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name that is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention; many 18th- and 19th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) works had extended titles that pretty much summed up the main events of the installment, but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.

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A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name that is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention; many 18th- 17th- and 19th-century 18th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) 19th-century) works had extended titles that pretty much summed up the main events of the installment, but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.



This trope probably descends from the poets' practice (common in the Renaissance era) of putting short summaries called "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument_%28literature%29 arguments]]" before every section of their poems.

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This trope probably descends comes from the poets' practice (common in the Renaissance era) of putting short summaries called "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument_%28literature%29 arguments]]" before every section of their poems.
29th Dec '16 12:30:31 AM Trying2CIt
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!! In Which the Details of the literary Convention "In Which a Trope Is Described" shall be Disseminated

A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name which is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention--many 18th- and 19th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) works had extended titles which pretty much summed up the main events of the installment--but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.

to:

!! In Which the Details of the literary Convention "In Which a Trope Is Described" shall will be Disseminated

A convention of giving a chapter (or work) a name which that is a summation of the contents ''of the chapter'' (or work). It used to be a serious writing convention--many convention; many 18th- and 19th-century (and occasionally, early 20th-century) works had extended titles which that pretty much summed up the main events of the installment--but installment, but it is not as likely to be taken seriously today. In modern works, this is a [[TitleTropes titling convention]] with an intentionally {{Retraux}} feel.



An equally old-fashioned variant is when the title consists of a number of short phrases which enumerate the main plot points of the chapter (and occasionally irrelevant side details). For instance: "A Trope is described.--The Summary of its Qualities.--'In Which Examples Are Listed'.--The Contributors provide the aforemention'd Examples.--End of the Page"

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An equally old-fashioned variant is when the title consists of a number of short phrases which that enumerate the main plot points of the chapter (and occasionally irrelevant side details). For instance: "A Trope is described.--The Summary of its Qualities.--'In Which Examples Are Listed'.--The Contributors provide the aforemention'd Examples.--End of the Page"
22nd Dec '16 6:57:23 PM Xtifr
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* Kim Stanley Robinson's ''The Years of Rice and Salt'' is divided into several sections, but the first section features chapter headings in this style.

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* Kim Stanley Robinson's ''The Years of Rice and Salt'' ''Literature/TheYearsOfRiceAndSalt'' is divided into several sections, but the first section features chapter headings in this style.
26th Oct '16 12:04:08 PM Korodzik
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* The Polish novel ''Księga urwisów'' uses the "plot point listing" variant for nearly all chapters.

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* The Polish novel ''Księga urwisów'' uses the "plot point listing" variant for nearly all chapters. Such as "An opportunity comes up. Unforeseen obstacle. Escape".
26th Oct '16 12:01:39 PM Korodzik
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* The Polish novel ''Księga urwisów'' uses the "plot point listing" variant for nearly all chapters.
20th Oct '16 6:04:20 AM ClatoLawa
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* Each of the chapters in ''Fanfic/TangledUpInYou'', several of them rather misleading, such as "In Which Someone Gets Marinette Very Wet" ( by convincing her to jump into a swimming pool.)

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* Each of the chapters in ''Fanfic/TangledUpInYou'', several of them rather misleading, misleading out of context, such as "In Which Someone Gets Marinette Very Wet" ( by (by convincing her to jump into a swimming pool.)
20th Oct '16 5:56:10 AM ClatoLawa
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* Each of the chapters in ''Fanfic/TangledUpInYou'', several of them rather misleading, such as "In Which Someone Gets Marinette Very Wet" ( by convincing her to jump into a swimming pool.)
29th Aug '16 3:07:16 PM RedMuseAniMusic
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[[folder: Western Animation]]
* My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic has the season five episode 'The one where Pinkie Pie knows' which is a parody on the comedy series Friends.


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[[folder:Western Animation]]
* My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic has the season five episode 'The one where Pinkie Pie knows' which is a parody on the comedy series Friends.
[[/folder]]
18th Aug '16 1:04:34 PM Divra
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* ''Literature/AManCalledOve'' gives every chapter a title which begins with "A man called Ove..." and always has something to do with the events therein. For example the chapter in which Ove reluctantly allows a disowned gay teenager and a stray cat to stay at his house is called "A man called Ove isn't running a goddamned hotel".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InWhichATropeIsDescribed