History Main / INeverSaidItWasPoison

19th Jun '16 11:06:04 AM Ebrbfureh
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* In ''FanFic/{{Pokeumans}}'' [[spoiler: Mindy]] gives herself away by accusing Brandon of stealing the Gemstone Files - documents that no-one in the base except the headmistress know even exist.

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* In ''FanFic/{{Pokeumans}}'' [[spoiler: Mindy]] gives herself away by accusing Brandon of stealing the Gemstone Files - documents Files—documents that no-one in the base except the headmistress know even exist.



* ''Film/MinorityReport'' has the villain realize the protagonists are onto him when he's caught in one of these. [[spoiler:Anderton's wife asks about Anne Lively's death, and Burgess pretends not to know about it, but says he'll see if "anyone drowned a woman by the name of - what did you say her name was?". "Anne Lively... but I never said she drowned."]]

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* ''Film/MinorityReport'' has the villain realize the protagonists are onto him when he's caught in one of these. [[spoiler:Anderton's wife asks about Anne Lively's death, and Burgess pretends not to know about it, but says he'll see if "anyone drowned a woman by the name of - what of—what did you say her name was?". "Anne Lively... but I never said she drowned."]]



--> '''Riggs''': Hey, I didn't say his name was 'Jack' - You'd better start telling me more than Jack Shit.

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--> '''Riggs''': Hey, I didn't say his name was 'Jack' - You'd 'Jack'—You'd better start telling me more than Jack Shit.



-->'''Moran:''' "So you want to hear a theory? You went down that garage to buy this sword from that guy -- what's his name?"

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-->'''Moran:''' "So you want to hear a theory? You went down that garage to buy this sword from that guy -- what's guy—what's his name?"



* In ''Film/ReindeerGames'', when everything's seemingly over [[spoiler: and Rudy, Ashley and Gabe - the survivors of the casino robbery - have gathered, Ashley mentions Rudy's cellmate Nick was stabbed with a shiv... but Rudy only told her his cellmate was killed; he never told her ''how''. A few moments later, a now-doubting Gabe gets offed by Ashley, and Nick turns out to have [[HesJustHiding been hiding]]...]]

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* In ''Film/ReindeerGames'', when everything's seemingly over [[spoiler: and Rudy, Ashley and Gabe - the Gabe—the survivors of the casino robbery - have robbery—have gathered, Ashley mentions Rudy's cellmate Nick was stabbed with a shiv... but Rudy only told her his cellmate was killed; he never told her ''how''. A few moments later, a now-doubting Gabe gets offed by Ashley, and Nick turns out to have [[HesJustHiding been hiding]]...]]



** Also common in ''Literature/TwoMinuteMysteries'', by the same author - things like "Dr. Smith was murdered, where were you at the time?" "I haven't been to a dentist in years."

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** Also common in ''Literature/TwoMinuteMysteries'', by the same author - things author—things like "Dr. Smith was murdered, where were you at the time?" "I haven't been to a dentist in years."



* Janet Tashjian's novel ''Multiple Choice'' has the main character fall victim to this. Monica chooses to write something nasty about her best friend on the upstairs school bathroom's stalls. When confronted about it, she denies vehemently, and convinces her friend that she wasn't the one who wrote it. As they walk away, she lets slip that "I'm never even up there" - despite her friend never saying which bathroom it was. A fight ensues.

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* Janet Tashjian's novel ''Multiple Choice'' has the main character fall victim to this. Monica chooses to write something nasty about her best friend on the upstairs school bathroom's stalls. When confronted about it, she denies vehemently, and convinces her friend that she wasn't the one who wrote it. As they walk away, she lets slip that "I'm never even up there" - despite there"—despite her friend never saying which bathroom it was. A fight ensues.



* In Creator/GrahamMcNeill's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} Literature/HorusHeresy'' novel ''False Gods'', Loken knows that Erebus is lying to him because he pointed out that the interex had accused them of stealing a kinebrach's sword -- and in fact, the interex had only accused them of stealing a weapon.

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* In Creator/GrahamMcNeill's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} Literature/HorusHeresy'' novel ''False Gods'', Loken knows that Erebus is lying to him because he pointed out that the interex had accused them of stealing a kinebrach's sword -- and sword—and in fact, the interex had only accused them of stealing a weapon.



* {{Literature/Spenser}} gets one of several hints the Stapleton family in ''Small Vices'' is lying about their son and his alleged non-involvement in the case Spenser has been hired to investigate when they specifically refer to it as a sex crime, since the fact that the victim was also murdered was far more likely to be of note to people who had supposedly only heard of it in passing. Their referring to it only a sex crime makes sense when, at the end of the book, [[spoiler:it's revealed it wasn't actually a murder - the victim and their son were playing a sex game involving EroticAsphyxiation and she accidentally died during it.]]

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* {{Literature/Spenser}} gets one of several hints the Stapleton family in ''Small Vices'' is lying about their son and his alleged non-involvement in the case Spenser has been hired to investigate when they specifically refer to it as a sex crime, since the fact that the victim was also murdered was far more likely to be of note to people who had supposedly only heard of it in passing. Their referring to it only a sex crime makes sense when, at the end of the book, [[spoiler:it's revealed it wasn't actually a murder - the murder—the victim and their son were playing a sex game involving EroticAsphyxiation and she accidentally died during it.]]



** In yet another case, Monk is called in to help along the investigation of what appears to be a woman's suicide. When the woman's co-workers are told about it, one of them immediately asks about the suicide note. Later, Monk points out that suicide notes aren't especially common, and the guy didn't ask if there was a note -- he ''knew'' there was a note. [[RuleOfDrama Pay no attention to the fact that most people don't know about the frequency of suicide notes]].

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** In yet another case, Monk is called in to help along the investigation of what appears to be a woman's suicide. When the woman's co-workers are told about it, one of them immediately asks about the suicide note. Later, Monk points out that suicide notes aren't especially common, and the guy didn't ask if there was a note -- he note—he ''knew'' there was a note. [[RuleOfDrama Pay no attention to the fact that most people don't know about the frequency of suicide notes]].



--->'''[=MacGyver=]: '''That's right, he did. That's exactly what he did. But you had no way of knowing that. Jeffrey, you opened the door, but you never looked inside. You never saw a periscope - at least, not this afternoon.

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--->'''[=MacGyver=]: '''That's right, he did. That's exactly what he did. But you had no way of knowing that. Jeffrey, you opened the door, but you never looked inside. You never saw a periscope - at periscope—at least, not this afternoon.



** In "A Deadly State of Mind," Columbo finds a witness to a crime - a blind man. So they bring their suspect, Dr. Collier, in, and [[spoiler:have a guy in shades walk in, sit down, and identify Dr. Collier as the man who nearly ran into him while driving away from the Donner house on the day of the murder. Dr. Collier claims to be able to use his medical training to tell the man is blind, and hands him a newspaper... which he reads perfectly. Columbo reveals it's actually the blind man's similar-looking brother, and there was no way Dr. Collier should've thought he was blind. Unless, of course, he had seen him while fleeing the scene of the crime.]]

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** In "A Deadly State of Mind," Columbo finds a witness to a crime - a crime—a blind man. So they bring their suspect, Dr. Collier, in, and [[spoiler:have a guy in shades walk in, sit down, and identify Dr. Collier as the man who nearly ran into him while driving away from the Donner house on the day of the murder. Dr. Collier claims to be able to use his medical training to tell the man is blind, and hands him a newspaper... which he reads perfectly. Columbo reveals it's actually the blind man's similar-looking brother, and there was no way Dr. Collier should've thought he was blind. Unless, of course, he had seen him while fleeing the scene of the crime.]]



** In "Butterfly with Shades of Gray," there is a subversion, since Fielding Chase mentions that the victim was shot in the back. Most viewers assume that Chase only knows this because he is the shooter, but Chase does give a reasonable explanation to make it seem like he didn't commit the crime (since he made it seem like he was on the phone with the victim when he was killed) - by stating that the victim would have told him over the phone that someone was aiming a gun at him, but since he didn't, he obviously was turned away from the shooter.

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** In "Butterfly with Shades of Gray," there is a subversion, since Fielding Chase mentions that the victim was shot in the back. Most viewers assume that Chase only knows this because he is the shooter, but Chase does give a reasonable explanation to make it seem like he didn't commit the crime (since he made it seem like he was on the phone with the victim when he was killed) - by killed)—by stating that the victim would have told him over the phone that someone was aiming a gun at him, but since he didn't, he obviously was turned away from the shooter.



** Another ''Mathnet'' example was "the Case of the Missing Air", involving a shock jock, Byle Dupe, suspected of robbing businesses who stopped sponsoring his radio show. While Dupe eventually is captured in the act, George Frankly and Kate Monday are convinced he's their man earlier on. Why? While questioning him on the robberies, Dupe claims to have been doing his radio show when the robberies took place - yet the time the robberies occurred were not made public.

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** Another ''Mathnet'' example was "the Case of the Missing Air", involving a shock jock, Byle Dupe, suspected of robbing businesses who stopped sponsoring his radio show. While Dupe eventually is captured in the act, George Frankly and Kate Monday are convinced he's their man earlier on. Why? While questioning him on the robberies, Dupe claims to have been doing his radio show when the robberies took place - yet place—yet the time the robberies occurred were not made public.



-->'''Benny''': It's like losing a -- how did you know she fell?

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-->'''Benny''': It's like losing a -- how a—how did you know she fell?



* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', [[spoiler:Adachi]] reveals himself by saying that he thought everyone was sure that "[[spoiler:Namatame]] put them in [the television]" -- no one but the murderer and the protagonists could have known that that was how the victims were killed. He had also cast suspicion on himself in an earlier instance when the protagonists [[spoiler:find a list of everyone that Namatame had put into the television: Adachi shows no surprise at the contents of the list despite the fact that it included people who were rescued before being murdered (and were therefore classed as mere "disappearances" that had no relation to the murders).]]

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', [[spoiler:Adachi]] reveals himself by saying that he thought everyone was sure that "[[spoiler:Namatame]] put them in [the television]" -- no television]"—no one but the murderer and the protagonists could have known that that was how the victims were killed. He had also cast suspicion on himself in an earlier instance when the protagonists [[spoiler:find a list of everyone that Namatame had put into the television: Adachi shows no surprise at the contents of the list despite the fact that it included people who were rescued before being murdered (and were therefore classed as mere "disappearances" that had no relation to the murders).]]



-->'''Unnamed court official:''' Your majesty, th-the queen! She--\\
'''King Orenthal:''' --Was poisoned by three drops of skull-spider venom placed in her wine?? '''[[BigNo NOOOOO!!]]'''\\

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-->'''Unnamed court official:''' Your majesty, th-the queen! She--\\
She—\\
'''King Orenthal:''' --Was —Was poisoned by three drops of skull-spider venom placed in her wine?? '''[[BigNo NOOOOO!!]]'''\\



'''King Orenthal:''' I'll find the scapeg-- real killers if it's the last thing I do!!

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'''King Orenthal:''' I'll find the scapeg-- scapeg— real killers if it's the last thing I do!!



* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': In the episode "The Hidden Enemy" one of the clones betrays his brothers. Captain Rex and Commander Cody discover a listening device planted in their command center, and begin to question a squad of suspected clones about it. The turncoat mentions the Jedi had left -- something only Rex and Cody knew at the time. Though strangely enough, he wasn't one of the suspects.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': In the episode "The Hidden Enemy" one of the clones betrays his brothers. Captain Rex and Commander Cody discover a listening device planted in their command center, and begin to question a squad of suspected clones about it. The turncoat mentions the Jedi had left -- something left—something only Rex and Cody knew at the time. Though strangely enough, he wasn't one of the suspects.
18th Jun '16 9:22:42 PM QueensrycheMike
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* This was how WFAA sportscaster Dale Hansen managed to trap three officials at Southern Methodist University into admitting they had been paying players on their football team. Hansen had gotten an envelope from a former SMU player who had alleged that he'd been paid by the program and that the envelope had money in it. Hansen then showed the envelope to the officials, and at first, administrator Henry Lee Parker admitted that he'd sent the envelope, but then immediately backtracked, as did the other two officials. At this point, Hansen knew the allegations were true because he'd never mentioned to Parker what had allegedly been in the envelope. Until then, all he had was the word of the former player. If the officials hadn't sent money, they wouldn't have backtracked from their original admission. This eventually led to SMU's football program being put on the NCAA's Death Penalty, meaning the program sanctioned cannot operate at all for a period of time.

to:

* This was how WFAA sportscaster Dale Hansen managed to trap three officials at Southern Methodist University into admitting they had been paying players on their football team. Hansen had gotten an envelope from a former SMU player who had alleged that he'd been paid by the program and that the envelope had money in it. Hansen then showed the envelope to the officials, and at first, administrator Henry Lee Parker admitted that he'd sent the envelope, but then immediately backtracked, as did the other two officials. At this point, Hansen knew the allegations were true because he'd never mentioned to Parker what had allegedly been in the envelope. Until then, all he had was the word of the former player. If the officials hadn't sent money, they wouldn't have backtracked from their original admission. This eventually led to SMU's football program being put on given the NCAA's Death Penalty, meaning the program sanctioned cannot operate at all for a period of time.
18th Jun '16 1:56:33 PM mhnospa
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* Parodied in ''Series/AngieTribeca'':
--> '''Angie Tribeca:''' One last question. Any idea how your cufflink was found inside an illegal ferret?
--> '''Mr Frontbutt:''' Well, I travel all over the world. It may have fallen when I was in the mountains. You know, these Himalayan soft bellies, they'll eat anything.
--> '''Angie Tribeca:''' I didn't say it was a Himalayan soft belly.
--> '''Mr Frontbutt:''' Well, you didn't say it wasn't.
--> '''Angie Tribeca:''' Damn it, he's good.
5th Jun '16 4:25:28 PM Dravencour
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** One story had Encyclopedia figuring out which member of a gang robbed a grocery store, his only piece of evidence being a knife left stuck into a watermelon. When confronting the gang, one of the members says his knife is an inch longer... despite the knife never having been taken out of the melon, and the watermelon specifically having been described as "huge" so that even the longer knife blade would still be completely hidden.

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** One story had Encyclopedia figuring out which member of a gang robbed a grocery store, his only piece of evidence being a knife left stuck into a watermelon. When confronting the gang, one of the members says the blade of his knife is an inch a half-inch longer... despite the knife never having been taken out of the melon, and the watermelon specifically having been described as "huge" so that even the longer knife blade would still be completely hidden. True to form, the member in question turns out to have been the robber.
19th May '16 6:21:10 PM Odacon_Spy
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* Used in one of the in-game skill books in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series (it levels up your Alchemy). The author of the book recounts a dinner party where everyone (including the author) is spying on the host. After the soup course is brought out, the host declares that all spies in his household have been poisoned, and the antidote is in the soup. Everyone tries to hold out, but one eventually gives in and frantically drinks the soup. [[spoiler:It turns out that the soup contained the poison, and the host was testing his employees.]]
19th May '16 9:08:36 AM Omeganian
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheRobotsOfDawn'', Elijah discusses the matter of Jander's deactivation with Amadiro, and suddenly Amadiro states that the woman at whose house the RidiculouslyHumanRobot was had a very unusual definition of husband. While it might have made sense for him that the robot was her ''lover'' (it's a FreeLoveFuture), there is no way he could have figured out the ''husband'' part; for Aurorans, marriage is a union with a potential for kids, so a RoboticSpouse in totally ridiculous. As such, he manages to prove Amadiro was attempting a GrandTheftPrototype (he desperately needed such robots, and their designer refused to cooperate) by thoroughly questioning Jander, so the guy is forced to fold before the investigation destroys his career completely.
8th May '16 8:50:29 AM DoctorCooper
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* ''Anime/{{Monster}}'' has this happen once too. In Episode Six, a couple of detectives are apparently transporting Tenma and Anna Liebert to their police station.(They actually work for Johan Leibert.) Tenma eventually figures this out when one of them calls him "Dr. Tenma" even though he only told them his name and not that he was a doctor.

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* ''Anime/{{Monster}}'' ''Manga/{{Monster}}'' has this happen once too. In Episode Six, a couple of detectives are apparently transporting Tenma and Anna Liebert to their police station.(They actually work for Johan Leibert.Liebert.) Tenma eventually figures this out when one of them calls him "Dr. Tenma" even though he only told them his name and not that he was a doctor.



* Not quite the same, but related: In the third season of ''Anime/SailorMoon'', Mistress 9 is posing as Hotaru to talk to Sailor Moon. Eventually, she refers to Sailor Moon by her real name, which tips her off: "Hotaru...how did you know I'm Usagi Tsukino?"

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* Not quite the same, but related: In the third season of ''Anime/SailorMoon'', Mistress 9 is posing as Hotaru to talk to Sailor Moon. Eventually, she refers to Sailor Moon by her real name, which tips her off: "Hotaru...how did you know I'm Usagi Tsukino?"
8th May '16 6:14:32 AM Morgenthaler
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* The eponymous [[ATouchOfFrost Frost]] pulls off a straight "but I never said it was murder" version. It fails as the suspect calmly points out the police don't send senior officers to inform people that their employee has been in an traffic accident.

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* ''Series/ATouchOfFrost'': The eponymous [[ATouchOfFrost Frost]] Frost pulls off a straight "but I never said it was murder" version. It fails as the suspect calmly points out the police don't send senior officers to inform people that their employee has been in an traffic accident.
4th May '16 6:53:47 PM QueensrycheMike
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* This was how WFAA sportscaster Dale Hansen managed to trap three officials at Southern Methodist University into admitting they had been paying players on their football team. Hansen showed an envelope to the officials, and at first, administrator Henry Lee Parker admitted that he'd sent the envelope, but then immediately backtracked, as did the other two officials. Hansen had gotten the envelope from a former SMU player who had alleged that he'd been paid by the program and that the envelope had money in it. At this point, Hansen knew the allegations were true because he'd never mentioned to Parker what was in the envelope. If the officials hadn't sent money, they wouldn't have at backtracked from their original admission. This eventually led to SMU's football program being put on the NCAA's Death Penalty, meaning the program sanctioned cannot operate at all for a period of time.

to:

* This was how WFAA sportscaster Dale Hansen managed to trap three officials at Southern Methodist University into admitting they had been paying players on their football team. Hansen had gotten an envelope from a former SMU player who had alleged that he'd been paid by the program and that the envelope had money in it. Hansen then showed an the envelope to the officials, and at first, administrator Henry Lee Parker admitted that he'd sent the envelope, but then immediately backtracked, as did the other two officials. Hansen had gotten the envelope from a former SMU player who had alleged that he'd been paid by the program and that the envelope had money in it. At this point, Hansen knew the allegations were true because he'd never mentioned to Parker what was had allegedly been in the envelope. Until then, all he had was the word of the former player. If the officials hadn't sent money, they wouldn't have at backtracked from their original admission. This eventually led to SMU's football program being put on the NCAA's Death Penalty, meaning the program sanctioned cannot operate at all for a period of time.
4th May '16 6:50:15 PM QueensrycheMike
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Added DiffLines:

* This was how WFAA sportscaster Dale Hansen managed to trap three officials at Southern Methodist University into admitting they had been paying players on their football team. Hansen showed an envelope to the officials, and at first, administrator Henry Lee Parker admitted that he'd sent the envelope, but then immediately backtracked, as did the other two officials. Hansen had gotten the envelope from a former SMU player who had alleged that he'd been paid by the program and that the envelope had money in it. At this point, Hansen knew the allegations were true because he'd never mentioned to Parker what was in the envelope. If the officials hadn't sent money, they wouldn't have at backtracked from their original admission. This eventually led to SMU's football program being put on the NCAA's Death Penalty, meaning the program sanctioned cannot operate at all for a period of time.
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