History Main / HyperSpaceArsenal

16th Aug '16 11:10:32 PM Galacton
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Video game characters, particularly in {{First Person Shooter}}s and {{Adventure Game}}s, have a seemingly superhuman ability to carry incredible amounts of stuff at one time, usually an array of weapons along with a couple hundred pounds of ammunition for each one. It doesn't limit their ability to run and jump and crawl through small spaces at all. What's more, when you see them during {{cutscene}}s in first-person games and third-person games, you can't see where they've stowed these things, even when they're wearing clothes that are more or less form-fitting. It seems they've put them away in the [[{{Hammerspace}} same realm]] where {{Hyperspace Mallet}}s are kept.

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Video game characters, particularly in {{Adventure Game}}s and {{First Person Shooter}}s and {{Adventure Game}}s, Shooter}}s, have a the seemingly superhuman ability to carry incredible amounts of stuff with them at one time, usually an array of weapons along with a couple hundred pounds of the ammunition for each one. It doesn't limit their ability to run and jump and crawl through small spaces at all. What's more, when you see them during {{cutscene}}s in first-person games and third-person games, you can't see where they've stowed these things, even when they're wearing clothes that are more or less form-fitting. It seems they've put them away in the [[{{Hammerspace}} same realm]] where {{Hyperspace Mallet}}s are kept.
8th Aug '16 3:36:03 AM Ripburger
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* ''VideoGame/XCom: UFO Defense'' uses a grid inventory in which each unit has a certain number of cells, in different shapes, on his belt, limbs, in his hands, and in his backpack. However, the backpack and items carried are never actually shown, except for the gun they hold. It still qualifies as this trope as most player-controlled units are perfectly capable of stowing a human body (unconscious or dead) or most alien corpses. In both cases, the mass is not visible, though it has a seriously detrimental effect on how quickly the unit can move per turn.

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* ''VideoGame/XCom: UFO Defense'' ''VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense'' uses a grid inventory in which each unit has a certain number of cells, in different shapes, on his belt, limbs, in his hands, and in his backpack. However, the backpack and items carried are never actually shown, except for the gun they hold. It still qualifies as this trope as most player-controlled units are perfectly capable of stowing a human body (unconscious or dead) or most alien corpses. In both cases, the mass is not visible, though it has a seriously detrimental effect on how quickly the unit can move per turn.
6th Aug '16 5:29:03 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' allows you to carry just two weapons and eight grenades, although you can also carry as many as four steamer trunk-sized boxes of rockets along with your 4 foot long rocket launcher. He's a genetically-engineered SuperSoldier in PoweredArmour strong enough to flip over ''tanks''. The only issue is where the ammo goes. ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' further averts this, with both player weapons being visible, unless you pick up a turret. They still have no ammo pouches. A Bungie employee explained this due to Master Chief's armor being magnetized in some way. On the ammo and grenade supply: "Who knows? It's magic." This example is conspicuous because a large fraction of the serious-shooter gaming-industry [[FollowTheLeader has followed Bungie's lead]] with ''Halo'', thus making the trope less common in the genre.

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* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' allows you to carry just two weapons and about eight grenades, although you can also carry as many as four steamer trunk-sized boxes of rockets along with your 4 foot long rocket launcher. He's You ''are'' usually playing as a genetically-engineered SuperSoldier in PoweredArmour strong enough to flip over ''tanks''. The ''tanks''; the only issue is where the ammo goes. Games from ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' onward further averts avert this, with both player of the player's weapons being visible, unless visible (unless you pick up a turret. They turret), though they still have no ammo pouches. A Bungie Creator/{{Bungie}} employee once explained this due to Master Chief's ability to just stick a gun on his back as being a result of his armor being magnetized in some way. On the ammo and grenade supply: "Who knows? It's magic." This example is conspicuous because a large fraction of the serious-shooter gaming-industry [[FollowTheLeader has followed Bungie's lead]] with ''Halo'', in limiting the player's arsenal, thus making the this trope less common in the genre.
1st Aug '16 9:05:40 PM Jacob175
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* ''VisualNovel/HotelDuskRoom215'' and its sequel ''VisualNovel/LastWindow'' isn't quite as bad about it as other games, as the items Kyle carries are mostly small enough that he could easily carry the majority of them in his pockets and even puts some away when he's done with them, but towards the end, the sheer number does get a little silly. A much more obvious and ridiculous moments comes in ''Last Window'' where he has to avert ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything and actually do his job as a salesman, which involves shoving every potential product into his inventory at once, enough to fill a small cardboard box and including two large bottles of laundry soap, and still walk around just fine.
26th Jul '16 11:22:47 PM RezaMaulana98
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* Everyone in ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'' carries infinite ammo for their weapons. Special mention given to Reaper, who has an endless supply of loaded twin shotguns in his longcoat, in which said shotguns are thrown away whenever he ran out of ammo; and Junkrat, who has an endless supply of the tire thing on his back that he uses for his ultimate.
6th Jul '16 1:15:29 PM JoieDeCombat
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* The ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' test of the trope occurred during their "Video Game Special" and involved an FPS-style combat course modeled after''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''. Adam and Jamie ran the course once discarding each weapon as they picked up a new one, then did it again keeping each new piece of equipment as they found it until they were carrying an 80-pound load. Both struggled visibly during the second run, taking nearly twice as long to complete the course as they did the first time through. Professional MMA fighter Brendan Schaub, on the other hand, made it through the course just as fast with the full load as he did unencumbered - not only that, but in his enthusiasm he forgot to actually use the backpack to store any of the items, and ''still'' finished the course faster encumbered than either Adam or Jamie managed in their control runs, leading to the "Plausible" verdict.

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* The ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' test of the trope occurred during their "Video Game Special" and involved an FPS-style combat course modeled after''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''.after ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''. Adam and Jamie ran the course once discarding each weapon as they picked up a new one, then did it again keeping each new piece of equipment as they found it until they were carrying an 80-pound load. Both struggled visibly during the second run, taking nearly twice as long to complete the course as they did the first time through. Professional MMA fighter Brendan Schaub, on the other hand, made it through the course just as fast with the full load as he did unencumbered - not only that, but in his enthusiasm he forgot to actually use the backpack to store any of the items, items he was carrying, and ''still'' finished the course faster encumbered than either Adam or Jamie managed in their control runs, leading to the "Plausible" verdict.
6th Jul '16 1:14:42 PM JoieDeCombat
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* The ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' tested how realistic it would be to try to carry an increasingly large arsenal of weapons and equipment through an FPS-style combat course (modeled on ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''). Adam and Jamie both struggled to manage the 80-pound load, taking twice as long to complete the course carrying everything as they did when they discarded each weapon upon finding a new one. Professional MMA fighter Brendan Schaub, on the other hand, made it through the course just as fast with the full load as he did unencumbered - not only that, but in his enthusiasm he forgot to actually use the backpack to store any of the items, and ''still'' finished the course faster encumbered than either Adam or Jamie managed in their control runs. The conclusion reached was that a video game hero can actually carry quite a lot of gear without being significantly impeded, if he's a trained fighter in excellent physical condition instead of an average guy.

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* The ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' tested how realistic it would be to try to carry an increasingly large arsenal test of weapons the trope occurred during their "Video Game Special" and equipment through involved an FPS-style combat course (modeled on ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''). modeled after''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''. Adam and Jamie both ran the course once discarding each weapon as they picked up a new one, then did it again keeping each new piece of equipment as they found it until they were carrying an 80-pound load. Both struggled to manage visibly during the 80-pound load, second run, taking nearly twice as long to complete the course carrying everything as they did when they discarded each weapon upon finding a new one. the first time through. Professional MMA fighter Brendan Schaub, on the other hand, made it through the course just as fast with the full load as he did unencumbered - not only that, but in his enthusiasm he forgot to actually use the backpack to store any of the items, and ''still'' finished the course faster encumbered than either Adam or Jamie managed in their control runs. The conclusion reached was that a video game hero can actually carry quite a lot of gear without being significantly impeded, if he's a trained fighter in excellent physical condition instead of an average guy. runs, leading to the "Plausible" verdict.
6th Jul '16 1:11:23 PM JoieDeCombat
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* The ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' tested how realistic it would be to try to carry an increasingly large arsenal of weapons and equipment through an FPS-style combat course (modeled on ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''). Adam and Jamie both struggled to manage the 80-pound load, taking twice as long to complete the course carrying everything as they did when they discarded each weapon upon finding a new one. Professional MMA fighter Brendan Schaub, on the other hand, made it through the course just as fast with the full load as he did unencumbered - not only that, but in his enthusiasm he forgot to actually use the backpack to store any of the items, and ''still'' finished the course faster encumbered than either Adam or Jamie managed in their control runs. The conclusion reached was that a video game hero can actually carry quite a lot of gear without being significantly impeded, if he's a trained fighter in excellent physical condition instead of an average guy.
12th Jun '16 10:16:39 PM KBABZ
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** The movie that ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank2016'' is based on explains it with telequipping, which teleports a weapon or gadget from the Hall of Heroes into your hands whilst wearing a Galactic Ranger Protosuit, and both works share the same visuals for this feature. In the game this is actually a plot hole, because Ratchet can telequip before being inducted into the Rangers ([[UnreliableNarrator but given that Captain Qwark is telling the story]]...).
3rd Jun '16 12:57:04 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' has always adhered to this trope, but ''Doom 3'' is probably the most blatant perpetrator. By the end of the game you're carrying a handgun, a shotgun, a machine gun, a chaingun, a bunch of grenades, a plasma rifle, a rocket launcher, a chainsaw, a PDA, a flashlight, a {{BFG}} whose barrel alone is bigger than a microwave oven, not to mention all the attendant ammunition, which can include fifty or so rockets and several BFG fuel cells the size of your head. Then in the cutscenes the character is seen carrying naught but a dinky shotgun.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' has always adhered to this trope, but ''Doom 3'' is probably the most blatant perpetrator. By trope. For example, by the end of the game ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'', you're carrying a handgun, a shotgun, a machine gun, a chaingun, a bunch of grenades, a plasma rifle, a rocket launcher, a chainsaw, a PDA, a flashlight, a {{BFG}} whose barrel alone is bigger than a microwave oven, not to mention all the attendant ammunition, which can include fifty or so rockets and several BFG fuel cells the size of your head. Then in the cutscenes the character is seen carrying naught but a dinky shotgun.
** ''VideoGame/Doom2016'', if anything, goes ''even further''. In addition to almost all the equipment mentioned above, you've also got a double-barreled shotgun, a [[MagneticWeapons Gauss cannon]], and a bunch of weapon attachments. Given that the main character [[spoiler:wears magic demon-forged armor, has Seraphim enhancements, and]] is implied to be something beyond human, his Hyperspace Arsenal is presumably part of his powerset.
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