History Main / HordesFromTheEast

26th Apr '16 8:19:30 PM Theriocephalus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The HordesFromTheEast will often act like TheHorde, [[IThoughtItMeant but they don't have to.]] Hordes From the East will always be presented as a feared foreign danger, but their behavior can vary. There's a chance that they don't pillage at all, or that they use clever strategies in battle instead of just brute force.

to:

The HordesFromTheEast Hordes from the East will often act like TheHorde, [[IThoughtItMeant but they don't have to.]] Hordes From from the East will always be presented as a feared foreign danger, but their behavior can vary. There's a chance that they don't pillage at all, or that they use clever strategies in battle instead of just brute force.
26th Apr '16 8:18:52 PM Theriocephalus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** More complicated examples occur as the series progresses. The Seanchan initially seem to be an alien horde (riding [[FantasticMounts alien animals]], to boot), but they come from the ''West'', and their culture is quickly revealed to be very complex and less concerned with rape-and-pillage than actual productive imperialism. The [[spoiler: Sharans]] invade in the last book, come from a land further East than the Aiel, and are definitely an alien horde for narrative purposes, but their means of invasion is giant portals, so they don't actually invade from the East.

to:

** More complicated examples occur as the series progresses. The Seanchan initially seem to be an alien horde (riding [[FantasticMounts [[HorseOfADifferentColor alien animals]], to boot), but they come from the ''West'', and their culture is quickly revealed to be very complex and less concerned with rape-and-pillage than actual productive imperialism. The [[spoiler: Sharans]] invade in the last book, come from a land further East than the Aiel, and are definitely an alien horde for narrative purposes, but their means of invasion is giant portals, so they don't actually invade from the East.



** Such "regularity" came with the fact that usually nomads from Central Asia had nothing really to live on save for herding animals. Whenever their population explodes, the explosion is often manifested by a roving horde that seeks to live in arable lands that can support such huge populations.

to:

** Such "regularity" came with the fact that usually nomads from Central Asia had nothing really to live on save for herding animals. Whenever their population explodes, exploded, the explosion is was often manifested by a roving horde that seeks seeking to live in arable lands that can could support such huge populations.



* The Ottoman Empire was a prime example of this trope to the countries of Central and Southeastern Europe - being Muslims, the Ottomans were always presented as the supreme threat to Christian civilization. It doesn't help that they also spoke a language very different to the local ones. They also have the advantage of having gunpowder weapons at their disposal which maintained their power and dominace.

to:

* The Ottoman Empire was a prime example of this trope to the countries of Central and Southeastern Europe - -- being Muslims, the Ottomans were always presented as the supreme threat to Christian civilization. It doesn't help that they also spoke a language very different to the local ones. They also have had the advantage of having gunpowder weapons at their disposal which maintained their power and dominace.
24th Mar '16 6:47:09 PM WillKeaton
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ChroniclesOfNarnia: While actually geographically to the South Calormen is based on somewhat on this trope. But Lewis makes a concerted effort, especially in ''A Horse and His Boy'' to subvert it by showing that many individual Calormen are good people and will go to Aslan's Country. And even the very patriotic Narnian Bree can show an amount of respect and admiration for aspect of the Calromen culture, like their love of ArabianKnights style storytelling.

to:

* ChroniclesOfNarnia: ''ChroniclesOfNarnia'': While actually geographically to the South Calormen is based on somewhat on this trope. But Lewis makes a concerted effort, especially in ''A Horse and His Boy'' to subvert it by showing that many individual Calormen are good people and will go to Aslan's Country. And even the very patriotic Narnian Bree can show an amount of respect and admiration for aspect of the Calromen culture, like their love of ArabianKnights style storytelling.
17th Mar '16 3:28:52 PM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The backstory concerning the decline of Gondor has a nomadic people called the Wain-Riders come out of the East perhaps twelve hundred years before the War of the Ring. They are horsemen whose primitive dwellings are built onto carts - ''wains'' in archaic English - who run rings around the infantry of Gondor. Tolkein appears to be describing the mongols, or a people like them, here. The families coming up behind Ghengiz Khan's armies loaded their ''yurt'' dwellings onto carts to make their dwelling places more portable so as to better follow the armies.
4th Mar '16 3:02:21 AM FurryKef
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** And while less spiritually true to this trope but literally fitting it, there are times when the "hordes" are numerous but from an otherwise "developed" culture using a superior population to expand against its' weaker neighbors. The other realms of Indonesia in the way of Majaphit, the peoples of Central Asia ([[HoistByTheirOwnPetard who would normally be the source of this trope]]) in the way of the Song Chinese, and the Chinese of the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar probably wouldn't have cared that the hordes attacking them were from complex and settled societies.

to:

*** And while less spiritually true to this trope but literally fitting it, there are times when the "hordes" are numerous but from an otherwise "developed" culture using a superior population to expand against its' its weaker neighbors. The other realms of Indonesia in the way of Majaphit, the peoples of Central Asia ([[HoistByTheirOwnPetard who would normally be the source of this trope]]) in the way of the Song Chinese, and the Chinese of the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar probably wouldn't have cared that the hordes attacking them were from complex and settled societies.
7th Feb '16 10:20:36 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[TheCrusades The Crusader armies]], from the Muslim point of view (despite having come from the West). Though the first Crusade began when the Muslim armies conquered Jerusalem.

to:

* [[TheCrusades [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades The Crusader armies]], from the Muslim point of view (despite having come from the West). Though the first Crusade began when the Muslim armies conquered Jerusalem.
23rd Jan '16 10:22:56 AM LordGro
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[AC:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'': Invoked (with humorous intentions) in the opening narration of episode "The Attila the Hun Show":
-->''"In the 5th century, as the once mighty Roman Empire crumbled, the soft underbelly of Western Europe lay invitingly exposed to the barbarian hordes to the East: Alaric the Visigoth, Gaiseric the Vandal, and Theoderic the Ostrogoth in turn swept westward in a reign of terror. But none surpassed in power and cruelty the mighty--Attila the Hun. ... Ladies and gentlemen, it's The Attila the Hun Show!"''
21st Jan '16 8:36:21 AM LordInsane
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** {{Inverted}} with the [[SillinessSwitch Sunset Invasion]] {{DLC}} where the Aztecs invade Europe from across the Atlantic Ocean.

to:

** {{Inverted}} with the [[SillinessSwitch Sunset Invasion]] {{DLC}} where the Aztecs invade Europe from across the Atlantic Ocean. In fact, inverting it was one of the points of the DLC -- while usually historicity was a greater concern than balance, going ahistorical for a while meant that (if the DLC is used, of course) western European lords no longer have the advantage over their eastern European counterparts that there isn't a rampaging horde a'coming for them.
12th Jan '16 5:14:58 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Dragonkin in ''{{Runescape}}'' are an example of this. Movario describes them as evil bird spirits of the East. When they ravaged the plane of Kethsi, a manuscript found thousands of years later by the player says they appeared in the East ([[FridgeLogic which is odd since Kethsi is almost certainly a round planet]] in the same solar system as [[GodOfGood Arm]][[WingedHumanoid adyl's]] home planet). When they finally appear in game, the player finds them ravaging a pirate island on the Eastern fringes of the world map.

to:

* The Dragonkin in ''{{Runescape}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}'' are an example of this. Movario describes them as evil bird spirits of the East. When they ravaged the plane of Kethsi, a manuscript found thousands of years later by the player says they appeared in the East ([[FridgeLogic which is odd since Kethsi is almost certainly a round planet]] in the same solar system as [[GodOfGood Arm]][[WingedHumanoid adyl's]] home planet). When they finally appear in game, the player finds them ravaging a pirate island on the Eastern fringes of the world map.
9th Dec '15 2:54:31 AM direguy
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In VII they resemble desert nomads and raiders, fighting or fleeing from other factions who want to re-enslave them.
This list shows the last 10 events of 127. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HordesFromTheEast