History Main / HistoricalInJoke

12th Mar '17 11:21:17 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/{{Sharpe}}'' comments on the effectiveness of his recently used and very lethal Napoleonic rocket technology:
-->'''[=Sharpe=]''': Well, Mr Giliand, I wouldn't be surprised if one day we reach the moon with one of your rockets.
* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': Spike's a font of this type of joke.
** Spike inspired Music/BillyIdol.
** He also lampshades the trope in his first line, mocking a low-ranking vampire claiming to have been at the crucifixion of Jesus.

to:

* ''Series/{{Sharpe}}'' comments on ''Series/TheAdventuresOfBriscoCountyJr.'' has historical in-jokes in virtually every episode, as Brisco encounters some gizmo which is sure to be the effectiveness next "coming thing".
* ''Series/AshesToAshes'' had a scene in season 3 which made Gene Hunt responsible for the vandalism to the ''Series/BluePeter'' garden in the 80s.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'': The episode "Comes the Inquisitor" revealed at the end that the titular character was [[spoiler:UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper]].
* ''All''
of his recently used ''Series/{{Blackadder}}''.
* TheRoaringTwenties set ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'' has a few. The pilot features Arnold Rothstein cheating at poker, when eight years later he would be killed thanks to welching on a lost poker hand.
** One of Nucky's friends brags about finding a great new Italian investor in Boston. A few episodes later he's broke,
and very lethal Napoleonic rocket technology:
-->'''[=Sharpe=]''': Well, Mr Giliand, I wouldn't be surprised if one day
we reach learn that the moon with one investor's name was Charles Ponzi.
** Annoyed because
of your rockets.
Masseria's demands to put a tax on their profits, Lucky Luciano tells Meyer Lansky that their business is "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicilian_Mafia#.22Cosa_Nostra.22_and_other_names our thing]], not his!"
* ''Franchise/{{Buffyverse}}'':
**
''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': Spike's a font of this type of joke.
** *** Spike inspired Music/BillyIdol.
** *** He also lampshades the trope in his first line, mocking a low-ranking vampire claiming to have been at the crucifixion of Jesus.



** Spike knows Dracula (Dracula owes him money), and is rather annoyed at the latter for writing a book about his exploits, [[NiceJobFixingItVillain thus making it so that most mortals know how to kill vampires.]]
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'' had at least one of its own, with Angel saying he crashed Elvis and Priscilla's wedding.
* ''Series/QuantumLeap'' had at least one every episode, including (among other things) Sam teaching a five-year-old Music/MichaelJackson to moonwalk.
** Other notable figures Sam meets (or Leaps into!) include: Creator/MarilynMonroe, Music/ElvisPresley, Music/BuddyHolly, Creator/StephenKing, and Lee Harvey Oswald.
** Sam also suggests that a young would-be boxer who worked in a meatpacking factory train by sparring with the frozen beef carcasses hanging around his workplace, mentioning that it was "something I saw in a movie." The grateful young boxer thanks Sam and closes his locker, upon which is his name: "[[Creator/SylvesterStallone S. Stallone]]".
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' [[Recap/StarTrekS2E14WolfInTheFold "Wolf in the Fold"]] revealed the secret truth behind UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper: He was Redjac, a PuppeteerParasite which has been a serial killer on several planets, including Earth.
** The two-part episode ''Time's Arrow'' in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' has Data accidentally sent back to 1893 San Francisco where he meets the author Creator/MarkTwain and a young bellhop named Jack London, who has an inexplicable desire to visit Alaska.
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
*** In the episode "Trials and Tribble-ations", they actually did this to a bit of ''Star Trek'''s own history -- in something much more than a simple ContinuityNod, the episode revealed that there was much more going on in the background of the [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries original series]] episode "The Trouble with Tribbles" than was initially seen by viewers in the 1960s. Also, the scene of Tribbles continuing to fall down on Kirk's head, one every ten seconds or so, long after the storage compartment had been opened and most of the tribbles had fallen out proves to be the [=DS9=] team's tossing Tribbles aside once scanned.
*** In the episode "LittleGreenMen", where the [[RoswellThatEndsWell Roswell aliens]] turn out to be Ferengi.
** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
*** In the episode "Flashback", Tuvok [[FlashBack flashes back]] to his service aboard the ''Excelsior''... during the time of ''Film/{{Star Trek VI|The Undiscovered Country}}''. He's even the one who gave Sulu the tea that we see knocked over at the beginning of the movie. Interestingly, since the original ''Trek'' actors had aged a good bit, many scenes that happened exactly as seen in ''Star Trek VI'' had to be redone (or else, Sulu ages ten years once original footage kicks in). Watch 'em back to back and you'll notice the tiniest differences, like the way Valtane's hand moves when he puts it on the railing, or Sulu saying "Shields! Shields!" a bit more loudly, or a few camera angles being different. Also, the ''Excelsior'''s warp engines only glow in original (i.e., "shot for the show") footage, as a new model's being used -- although the nacelles of the movie model were wired to glow, they didn't.
*** An incident occurred during the filming of the above episode that is either the greatest historical in-joke, or the luckiest accident, of ''Star Trek'' history. During the flashback sequences, we see Dimitri Valtane die, despite his chronologically later appearance at the end of ''Star Trek VI''. [[WordOfGod The writers]] jokingly suggested he had a twin brother serving on the same ship, but the general {{fanon}} response was that he had been successfully resuscitated off screen. The former is now accepted as correct, however, because in the opening scenes of ''Star Trek VI'', because of a poor editing job, Valtane is seen to be manning two separate consoles on opposite sides of the bridge. Only one of him appears at the end, so the twin theory is actually the best solution.
*** In the two-parter "Future's End" the Digital Revolution only happens because of a crashed timeship.
** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pulled a cute one in the episode "Carbon Creek". ''Star Trek'' {{canon}} states that humanity met the Vulcans in the late 21st century after Cochrane's warp flight. Apparently, a little-known fact is that a Vulcan survey ship crashed in Pennsylvania in the '50s. A Vulcan woman raises money for a boy to go to college by introducing the bank owner to a strangely adhesive fabric, [[ETGaveUsWiFi better known as Velcro]], invented in the real world by "George" de Mestral. (The name of one of the Vulcans? Mestral.)
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' got some nice examples. Like in e.g. 'The Funniest Joke In The World': "It was a fantastic success, over 60.000 times as powerful as Britain's great pre-war joke ''(cue PM UsefulNotes/NevilleChamberlain waving around a ''certain'' piece of paper in public ''[[note]] The Munich Agreement.[[/note]]'')''!".
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' did a double in-joke by having an alternate dimension President UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy assassinate ''[[ItMakesSenseInContext himself]]'' -- from behind the grassy knoll.
** ''Timeslides'' has a few for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Using the titular 'timeslides', Lister travels back to a Hitler-led rally and attempts to persuade the crowd not to believe him because he's 'a complete nutter - and he's only got one testicle.' Lister returns from the past with a suitcase from Claus von Stauffenberg, which triggers a predictable panic if you know [[Film/{{Valkyrie}} who he was]].
* ''Series/TheXFiles'', "Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man", shows the CSM writing a fictionalized account of a mysterious government operative (himself) assassinating JFK and MLK. However, it is strongly implied that much of the story is made up to make him seem more important. He also gives a standing order for the Bills to never win a Super Bowl, which explains a lot.[[note]]CSM's operatives have been following his order a little too zealously. Since the episode aired in 1996, the Bills haven't even won a playoff game.[[/note]] He also apparently drugged the Russian goalie during the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" when the US men's hockey team beat the far superior Russian squad.
* Like in the ''Star Trek: The Original Series'' example above, ''Series/BabylonFive'' also revealed the secret truth behind UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper.
* Hilda's and Zelda's exploits in ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' are liberally sprinkled with historical in-jokes. "And that was how Aunt Hilda started something called the American Revolution."
-->"Oh, so ''that's'' why [the Parthenon is] in ruins!"\\
"Yes! Luckily, History blamed the Turks."
* ''Series/TheAdventuresOfBriscoCountyJr.'' has historical in-jokes in virtually every episode, as Brisco encounters some gizmo which is sure to be the next "coming thing".
* Naturally, ''Series/DoctorWho'', being a show centered around time travel, had plenty of these. The Doctor himself, for instance, wrote ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' down for Creator/WilliamShakespeare after the latter had sprained his wrist writing sonnets, and the Great Fire of London was started by a dying alien.
** In the new series episode "The Shakespeare Code", the Tenth Doctor accidentally suggested a good many of his most famous lines to the Bard, including "to be or not to be". The Doctor even gives him Creator/DylanThomas's "Rage, rage against the dying of the light", but tells Shakespeare that "it's been used." Also, Shakespeare wrote the sonnet beginning with "Shall I compare thee...?" to the Doctor's companion, who also happened to be the Dark Lady mentioned in some of his other poems. (Although that particular sonnet is ''not'' believed to be about the Dark Lady.)
** In the episode "Father's Day", the whole of [[TemporalParadox time itself begins screwing up due to interference with someone's death]], causing such stuff as a phone ringing which when picked up treats the listener to "Watson, come quickly, I need you...", [[spoiler: the first words ever spoken through a phone, by Alexander Graham Bell]].
** Similar to the way the Doctor name drops the famous historical figures he's met, Jack Harkness has a tendency to drop the names of famous historical figures he's ''dated'' in ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.
*** The Doctor does the same at least once, in "The End of Time", when Ten informs Ood Sigma (who seems completely unimpressed, and probably has no idea what he's talking about anyway) that he married Queen Elizabeth I and that one of her nicknames is no longer accurate. We get to see the wedding later on, in "The Day of the Doctor".
** And in the 2008 series it is also revealed that [[spoiler: the Doctor and his companion]] were responsible for the eruption of Vesuvius. Earlier in the same episode, we get both a historical in-joke and a ContinuityNod, as the Tenth Doctor very quickly tells Donna that "Before you ask, that fire had nothing to do with me. Well, a little bit..." referring to the Great Fire of Rome in AD 64, which in a ''very'' early episode was shown to have been inadvertently inspired by the First Doctor accidentally setting a map on fire with the light through his spectacles.
** Donna, being unaware of the exact point of Creator/AgathaChristie's career at the point where she meets her, tries to sell the author several of her own ideas, like ''Literature/MissMarple,'' or ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress''.
*** That same episode also deals with Creator/AgathaChristie's infamous disappearance. According to ''Doctor Who,'' a [[spoiler:giant alien wasp started killing people in the same way as in her books, due to being linked to her. So when the alien died, she in turn fell into a deep sleep and then turned up in the hotel that was was historically tied to her disappearance]].
** In series five, The Doctor and Amy go to visit Van Gogh; Amy greets the artist with lots and ''lots'' of sunflowers. Very subtle. (The Doctor also reveals in the same episode that apparently Creator/MichelangeloBuonarroti had a fear of heights.)
** The Eleventh Doctor gave UsefulNotes/RichardNixon the idea of taping everything in his office...so he'd know if he had his mind wiped by aliens.
*** The same episode also explains why there is a two second gap between the words "That's one small step for Man" and "One Giant Leap for Mankind"

to:

** *** Spike knows Dracula (Dracula owes him money), and is rather annoyed at the latter for writing a book about his exploits, [[NiceJobFixingItVillain thus making it so that most mortals know how to kill vampires.]]
* ** ''Series/{{Angel}}'' had at least one of its own, with Angel saying he crashed Elvis and Priscilla's wedding.
* ''Series/QuantumLeap'' had at least one every episode, including (among other things) Sam teaching a five-year-old Music/MichaelJackson to moonwalk.
** Other notable figures Sam meets (or Leaps into!) include: Creator/MarilynMonroe, Music/ElvisPresley, Music/BuddyHolly, Creator/StephenKing, and Lee Harvey Oswald.
** Sam also suggests that a young would-be boxer who worked in a meatpacking factory train by sparring with the frozen beef carcasses hanging around his workplace, mentioning that it was "something I saw in a movie." The grateful young boxer thanks Sam and closes his locker, upon which is his name: "[[Creator/SylvesterStallone S. Stallone]]".
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' [[Recap/StarTrekS2E14WolfInTheFold "Wolf in the Fold"]] revealed the secret truth behind UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper: He was Redjac, a PuppeteerParasite which has been a serial killer on several planets, including Earth.
** The two-part episode ''Time's Arrow'' in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' has Data accidentally sent back to 1893 San Francisco where he meets the author Creator/MarkTwain and a young bellhop named Jack London, who has an inexplicable desire to visit Alaska.
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
*** In the episode "Trials and Tribble-ations", they actually did this to a bit of ''Star Trek'''s own history -- in something much more than a simple ContinuityNod, the episode revealed that there was much more going on in the background of the [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries original series]] episode
A character from ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' called "The Trouble with Tribbles" than Angel Of Destiny" was initially seen by viewers in the 1960s. Also, the scene of Tribbles continuing to fall down on Kirk's head, one every ten seconds or so, long after the storage compartment had been opened and most of the tribbles had fallen out proves to be the [=DS9=] team's tossing Tribbles aside once scanned.
*** In the episode "LittleGreenMen", where the [[RoswellThatEndsWell Roswell aliens]] turn out to be Ferengi.
** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
*** In the episode "Flashback", Tuvok [[FlashBack flashes back]] to his service aboard the ''Excelsior''... during the time of ''Film/{{Star Trek VI|The Undiscovered Country}}''. He's even the one who gave Sulu the tea
reason Music/BritneySpears got famous.
* The [[ShortRunners single-season]] SciFi series ''Series/DarkSkies'' centered around this trope, "revealing"
that we see knocked over at the beginning of the movie. Interestingly, since the original ''Trek'' actors had aged a good bit, many scenes that happened exactly as seen in ''Star Trek VI'' had to be redone (or else, Sulu ages ten years once original footage kicks in). Watch 'em back to back and you'll notice the tiniest differences, like the way Valtane's hand moves when he puts it on the railing, or Sulu saying "Shields! Shields!" a bit more loudly, or a few camera angles being different. Also, the ''Excelsior'''s warp engines only glow in original (i.e., "shot for the show") footage, as a new model's being used -- although the nacelles of the movie model were wired to glow, they didn't.
*** An incident occurred during the filming of the above episode that is either the greatest historical in-joke,
aliens or the luckiest accident, of ''Star Trek'' history. During the flashback sequences, we see Dimitri Valtane die, despite his chronologically later appearance at the end of ''Star Trek VI''. [[WordOfGod The writers]] jokingly suggested he had a twin brother serving on the same ship, but the general {{fanon}} response was that he had been successfully resuscitated off screen. The former is now accepted as correct, however, because in the opening scenes of ''Star Trek VI'', because of a poor editing job, Valtane is seen GovernmentConspiracy to be manning two separate consoles on opposite sides of the bridge. Only one of him appears at the end, so the twin theory is actually the best solution.
*** In the two-parter "Future's End" the Digital Revolution only happens because of a crashed timeship.
** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pulled a cute one in the episode "Carbon Creek". ''Star Trek'' {{canon}} states that humanity met the Vulcans in the late 21st century after Cochrane's warp flight. Apparently, a little-known fact is that a Vulcan survey ship crashed in Pennsylvania in the '50s. A Vulcan woman raises money for a boy to go to college by introducing the bank owner to a strangely adhesive fabric, [[ETGaveUsWiFi better known as Velcro]], invented in the real world by "George" de Mestral. (The name of one of the Vulcans? Mestral.)
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' got some nice examples. Like in e.g. 'The Funniest Joke In The World': "It was a fantastic success, over 60.000 times as powerful as Britain's great pre-war joke ''(cue PM UsefulNotes/NevilleChamberlain waving around a ''certain'' piece of paper in public ''[[note]] The Munich Agreement.[[/note]]'')''!".
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' did a double in-joke by having an alternate dimension President UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy assassinate ''[[ItMakesSenseInContext himself]]'' -- from behind the grassy knoll.
** ''Timeslides'' has a few for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Using the titular 'timeslides', Lister travels back to a Hitler-led rally and attempts to persuade the crowd not to believe him because he's 'a complete nutter - and he's only got one testicle.' Lister returns from the past with a suitcase from Claus von Stauffenberg, which triggers a predictable panic if you know [[Film/{{Valkyrie}} who he was]].
* ''Series/TheXFiles'', "Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man", shows the CSM writing a fictionalized account of a mysterious government operative (himself) assassinating JFK and MLK. However, it is strongly implied that much of the story is made up to make him seem more important. He also gives a standing order for the Bills to never win a Super Bowl, which explains a lot.[[note]]CSM's operatives
fight them have been following his order a little too zealously. Since the episode aired involved in 1996, the Bills haven't even won a playoff game.[[/note]] He also apparently drugged the Russian goalie during the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" when the US men's hockey team beat the far superior Russian squad.
* Like in the ''Star Trek: The Original Series'' example above, ''Series/BabylonFive'' also revealed the secret truth behind UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper.
* Hilda's and Zelda's exploits in ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' are liberally sprinkled with historical in-jokes. "And that was how Aunt Hilda started something called the American Revolution."
-->"Oh, so ''that's'' why [the Parthenon is] in ruins!"\\
"Yes! Luckily, History blamed the Turks."
* ''Series/TheAdventuresOfBriscoCountyJr.'' has historical in-jokes in virtually
almost every episode, as Brisco encounters some gizmo which is sure to be major event over the next "coming thing".
course of the mid-60s, from the Kennedy assassination on down.
* Naturally, ''Series/DoctorWho'', being a show centered around time travel, had has plenty of these. these.
**
The Doctor himself, for instance, wrote ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' down for Creator/WilliamShakespeare after the latter had sprained his wrist writing sonnets, and the Great Fire of London was [[Recap/DoctorWhoS19E4TheVisitation started by a dying alien.
** In the new series episode "The Shakespeare Code", the Tenth Doctor accidentally suggested a good many of his most famous lines to the Bard, including "to be or not to be". The Doctor even gives him Creator/DylanThomas's "Rage, rage against the dying of the light", but tells Shakespeare that "it's been used." Also, Shakespeare wrote the sonnet beginning with "Shall I compare thee...?" to the Doctor's companion, who also happened to be the Dark Lady mentioned in some of his other poems. (Although that particular sonnet is ''not'' believed to be about the Dark Lady.)
** In the episode "Father's Day", the whole of [[TemporalParadox time itself begins screwing up due to interference with someone's death]], causing such stuff as a phone ringing which when picked up treats the listener to "Watson, come quickly, I need you...", [[spoiler: the first words ever spoken through a phone, by Alexander Graham Bell]].
** Similar to the way the Doctor name drops the famous historical figures he's met, Jack Harkness has a tendency to drop the names of famous historical figures he's ''dated'' in ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.
*** The Doctor does the same at least once, in "The End of Time", when Ten informs Ood Sigma (who seems completely unimpressed, and probably has no idea what he's talking about anyway) that he married Queen Elizabeth I and that one of her nicknames is no longer accurate. We get to see the wedding later on, in "The Day of the Doctor".
** And in the 2008 series it is also revealed that [[spoiler: the Doctor and his companion]] were responsible for the eruption of Vesuvius. Earlier in the same episode, we get both a historical in-joke and a ContinuityNod, as the Tenth Doctor very quickly tells Donna that "Before you ask, that fire had nothing to do with me. Well, a little bit..." referring to the Great Fire of Rome in AD 64, which in a ''very'' early episode was shown to have been inadvertently inspired by the First Doctor accidentally setting a map on fire with the light through his spectacles.
** Donna, being unaware of the exact point of Creator/AgathaChristie's career at the point where she meets her, tries to sell the author several of her own ideas, like ''Literature/MissMarple,'' or ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress''.
*** That same episode also deals with Creator/AgathaChristie's infamous disappearance. According to ''Doctor Who,'' a [[spoiler:giant alien wasp started killing people in the same way as in her books, due to being linked to her. So when the alien died, she in turn fell into a deep sleep and then turned up in the hotel that was was historically tied to her disappearance]].
** In series five, The Doctor and Amy go to visit Van Gogh; Amy greets the artist with lots and ''lots'' of sunflowers. Very subtle. (The Doctor also reveals in the same episode that apparently Creator/MichelangeloBuonarroti had a fear of heights.)
** The Eleventh Doctor gave UsefulNotes/RichardNixon the idea of taping everything in his office...so he'd know if he had his mind wiped by aliens.
*** The same episode also explains why there is a two second gap between the words "That's one small step for Man" and "One Giant Leap for Mankind"
alien]].



-->'''Romana:''' Newton? Who was Newton?
-->'''The Doctor:''' Old Isaac? Friend of mine on Earth. Discovered gravity. Well, I say he discovered gravity, I had to give him a bit of a prod.
-->'''Romana:''' What did you do?
-->'''The Doctor:''' Climbed up a tree.
-->'''Romana:''' And?
-->'''The Doctor:''' [[CoconutMeetsCranium Dropped an apple on his head.]]
-->'''Romana:''' Ah, and so he discovered gravity.
-->'''The Doctor:''' No, no, he told me to clear off out of his tree. I explained it to him afterwards at dinner.

to:

-->'''Romana:''' Newton? Who was Newton?
-->'''The
Newton?\\
'''The
Doctor:''' Old Isaac? Friend of mine on Earth. Discovered gravity. Well, I say he discovered gravity, I had to give him a bit of a prod.
-->'''Romana:'''
prod.\\
'''Romana:'''
What did you do?
-->'''The
do?\\
'''The
Doctor:''' Climbed up a tree.
-->'''Romana:''' And?
-->'''The
tree.\\
'''Romana:''' And?\\
'''The
Doctor:''' [[CoconutMeetsCranium Dropped an apple on his head.]]
-->'''Romana:'''
]]\\
'''Romana:'''
Ah, and so he discovered gravity.
-->'''The
gravity.\\
'''The
Doctor:''' No, no, he told me to clear off out of his tree. I explained it to him afterwards at dinner.dinner.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay "Father's Day"]], the whole of [[TemporalParadox time itself begins screwing up due to interference with someone's death]], causing such stuff as a phone ringing which when picked up treats the listener to "Watson, come quickly, I need you...", [[spoiler: the first words ever spoken through a phone, by Alexander Graham Bell]].
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]], the Tenth Doctor accidentally suggested a good many of his most famous lines to the Bard, including "to be or not to be". The Doctor even gives him Creator/DylanThomas's "Rage, rage against the dying of the light", but tells Shakespeare that "it's been used." Also, Shakespeare wrote the sonnet beginning with "Shall I compare thee...?" to the Doctor's companion, who also happened to be the Dark Lady mentioned in some of his other poems. (Although that particular sonnet is ''not'' believed to be about the Dark Lady.)
** Similar to the way the Doctor name drops the famous historical figures he's met, Jack Harkness has a tendency to drop the names of famous historical figures he's ''dated'' in ''Series/{{Torchwood}}''.
*** The Doctor does the same at least once, in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E17E18TheEndOfTime "The End of Time"]], when Ten informs Ood Sigma (who seems completely unimpressed, and probably has no idea what he's talking about anyway) that he married Queen Elizabeth I and that one of her nicknames is no longer accurate. We get to see the wedding later on, in [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor"]].
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E2TheFiresOfPompeii "The Fires of Pompeii"]]: [[spoiler: The Doctor and Donna]] were responsible for the eruption of Vesuvius. Earlier in the episode, we get both a historical in-joke and a ContinuityNod, as the Tenth Doctor very quickly tells Donna that "Before you ask, that fire had nothing to do with me. Well, a little bit..." referring to the Great Fire of Rome in AD 64, which in a ''very'' [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E4TheRomans early episode]] was shown to have been inadvertently inspired by the First Doctor accidentally setting a map on fire with the light through his spectacles.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E7TheUnicornAndTheWasp "The Unicorn and the Wasp"]]: Donna, being unaware of the exact point of Creator/AgathaChristie's career at the point where she meets her, tries to sell the author several of her own ideas, like ''Literature/MissMarple,'' or ''Literature/MurderOnTheOrientExpress''.
*** That same episode also deals with Creator/AgathaChristie's infamous disappearance. According to ''Doctor Who,'' a [[spoiler:giant alien wasp started killing people in the same way as in her books, due to being linked to her. So when the alien died, she in turn fell into a deep sleep and then turned up in the hotel that was was historically tied to her disappearance]].
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E10VincentAndTheDoctor "Vincent and the Doctor"]], the Doctor and Amy visit van Gogh; Amy greets the artist with lots and ''lots'' of sunflowers. Very subtle. (The Doctor also reveals in the same episode that apparently Creator/MichelangeloBuonarroti had a fear of heights.)
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon "Day of the Moon"]]: The Eleventh Doctor gave UsefulNotes/RichardNixon the idea of taping everything in his office . . . so he'd know if he had his mind wiped by aliens.
*** The same episode also explains why there is a two second gap between the words "That's one small step for Man" and "One Giant Leap for Mankind".
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E2DinosaursOnASpaceship "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship"]] explains why Queen Nefertiti mysteriously vanished from Egyptian records fourteen years into her husband's reign: Thanks to the Doctor, she met British [[GreatWhiteHunter big-game hunter]] John Riddell, from 1902, and ran off with him.



* ''All'' of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}''.
* The [[ShortRunners single-season]] SciFi series ''Series/DarkSkies'' centered around this trope, "revealing" that aliens or the GovernmentConspiracy to fight them have been involved in almost every major event over the course of the mid-60s, from the Kennedy assassination on down.
* ''Series/YoungIndianaJones'' sees Indy meeting virtually every major historical figure of the early 20th century before his 21st birthday.

to:

* ''All'' of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}''.
* The [[ShortRunners single-season]] SciFi series ''Series/DarkSkies'' centered around this trope, "revealing"
''Series/ForeverKnight'' had a UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper episode, with the secret being that aliens or he was a strange, beastly vampire that [[TooSpicyForYogSothoth Lacroix couldn't fully drain]]. He also was responsible for the GovernmentConspiracy crimes of a few other serial killers later on. There was also a flashback encounter between Lacroix and a young German soldier/artist who turned out to fight them be Hitler, as well as UsefulkNotes/RasputinTheMadMonk being a vampire sired by Lacroix.
* From the ''Series/{{Glee}}'' episode "The Rhodes Not Taken":
-->'''Emma''': A couple of years ago I started an online flirtation with an old high school flame, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan Andy]]. Things got weird and I called it off. And two months later (DramaticPause) Versace was dead. (DramaticPause) Dead.
* Sophia Petrillo, an immigrant from Sicily and a woman in her 80s by the time of the show, in ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'' made a lot of these. It's usually unclear if she's lying or joking, her memories have ''really'' been twisted by old age, or both. Among other things, she's claimed to have had affairs with Pablo Picasso (she ended it when she was offended by his portrait of her) and Sigmund Freud (Sophia recalls that he loved to drive through tunnels), to
have been involved in almost every major event friends and business partners with Mama Celeste until they fought over a man, to have been a contestant on a game show called ''Torture'' that was hosted by Mussolini, and to have been present at the course Valentine's Day Massacre with her husband and father when their car broke down in Chicago (although she does concede that it might have just been ''a'' Valentine's Day Massacre.)
** Since the entire main cast is over 50, the others all engage in this to a lesser extent. For example, Andy Rooney wanted to have an affair with Blanche but she turned him down, and Rose's high school history teacher may or may not have been Adolf Hitler after he faked his death and was hiding under an alias. The main evidence for this is that [[RefugeInAudacity Rose's high school gym teacher openly identified as Eva Braun]].
* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'': According to Gaugin's accounts, the reason why Creator/VincentVanGogh went mad and cut off his ear was because of a [[TheMuse muse (the mythical kind).]]
* ''{{Series/Highlander}}'' has a couple of these, most notably Methos and his three buddies inspiring the legend
of the mid-60s, from the Kennedy assassination on down.
* ''Series/YoungIndianaJones'' sees Indy meeting virtually every major historical figure
Four Horsemen of the early 20th century before his 21st birthday.Apocalypse. Then there's the immortal who was UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII's handmaiden, and Duncan taking part in Operation Valkyrie and the Battle of Culloden...
** One of the novels references Music/ElvisPresley dying because he was an immortal and was getting too famous, only he kept popping up in different places, explaining the Elvis sightings.



* In ''Series/LostGirl'', the Sudanese genocide is thought to be partially attributable to the Djieiene, a mystical spider whose bite causes HatePlague[=s=].
* In ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'', the court historian is none other than Geoffrey of Monmouth, the man who wrote the King Arthur legends. Of course, that's a bit of ArtisticLicense (at best) and CriticalResearchFailure (at worst); the historical Geoffrey of Monmouth lived about 500 years after when King Arthur would have been alive (were he real-no one knows for sure). Given that the Kingdom of Camelot does not appear to even be ''on an island'', that caveat is somewhat beside the point. No one is pretending these people are English ''or'' anywhere in actual history.
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' got some nice examples. Like in e.g. 'The Funniest Joke In The World': "It was a fantastic success, over 60.000 times as powerful as Britain's great pre-war joke ''(cue PM UsefulNotes/NevilleChamberlain waving around a ''certain'' piece of paper in public ''[[note]] The Munich Agreement.[[/note]]'')''!".
* ''Series/MurdochMysteries''
** A season 3 episode has Creator/HGWells in Toronto to speak at a meeting of the "Eugenics Society", a group dedicated to the improvement of humanity by scientific means. The event and the discovery that a local scientist is experimenting on animals give Wells an idea for a story about human experimentation, "...perhaps on a [[Literature/TheIslandOfDoctorMoreau remote island]]."
** A different episode had Creator/ArthurConanDoyle visiting the police station, where he finds Inspector Brackenreid is a great fan of his work. All through the episode, Brackenreid keeps telling him about an idea for a new Literature/SherlockHolmes book he had, and had thought of calling it "Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles". Doyle walks away at the end of the episode repeating the title to himself.
*** Doyle returns in a later episode, when they call him in to try and break through the delusion of a man who believes himself to be Sherlock. Doyle tries pointing out that Holmes died at Reichenbach Falls, and is taken aback when "Holmes" has a perfectly coherent explanation for both how he survived and where he's been since - the same one Doyle uses in "The Adventure of the Empty House". The episode also features a real criminal, who "Holmes" believes to be one of Moriarty's henchmen, called Sebastian Moran. Doyle mentions he likes the name.
** The episode "All That Glitters" has two: in the main story, Murdoch's investigation of the murder of an Ontario surveyor leads to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobalt_Silver_Rush Cobalt Silver Rush]]. In the B-plot, the painting Inspector Brakenreid did during his TenMinuteRetirement at the beginning of the season has been entered into a competition, and a young man is very impressed by it. The man, who particularly likes the way Brakenreid paints foliage with non-representative colours to make it stand out more (he ran out of green), eventually buys the painting for $15 to inspire his own work, at which point we learn his name is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Thomson Tom Thomson]].
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' had a story arc where Pearl, Observer, and Bobo travel back to ancient Rome. As they leave for their own time, Bobo steals a wheel of cheese, knocking down a candle in the hay-filled room and starting a fire that can be heard throughout the end credits. It's implied that this is the great fire that burned down the city.



* ''Series/PanAm'' is prone to a few of these, as it is set in the 1960's. Examples include:
** "It's Castro's country. He'll never keep it."
** "That Music/BobDylan will be famous, mark my words."
* ''Series/QuantumLeap'' had at least one every episode, including (among other things) Sam teaching a five-year-old Music/MichaelJackson to moonwalk.
** Other notable figures Sam meets (or Leaps into!) include: Creator/MarilynMonroe, Music/ElvisPresley, Music/BuddyHolly, Creator/StephenKing, and Lee Harvey Oswald.
** Sam also suggests that a young would-be boxer who worked in a meatpacking factory train by sparring with the frozen beef carcasses hanging around his workplace, mentioning that it was "something I saw in a movie." The grateful young boxer thanks Sam and closes his locker, upon which is his name: "[[Creator/SylvesterStallone S. Stallone]]".
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' did a double in-joke by having an alternate dimension President UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy assassinate ''[[ItMakesSenseInContext himself]]'' -- from behind the grassy knoll.
** "Timeslides" has a few for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Using the titular 'timeslides', Lister travels back to a Hitler-led rally and attempts to persuade the crowd not to believe him because he's 'a complete nutter - and he's only got one testicle.' Lister returns from the past with a suitcase from Claus von Stauffenberg, which triggers a predictable panic if you know [[Film/{{Valkyrie}} who he was]].



* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' had a story arc where Pearl, Observer, and Bobo travel back to ancient Rome. As they leave for their own time, Bobo steals a wheel of cheese, knocking down a candle in the hay-filled room and starting a fire that can be heard throughout the end credits. It's implied that this is the great fire that burned down the city.

to:

* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' had a story arc where Pearl, Observer, Hilda's and Bobo travel back to ancient Rome. As they leave for their own time, Bobo steals a wheel of cheese, knocking down a candle Zelda's exploits in the hay-filled room and starting a fire ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' are liberally sprinkled with historical in-jokes. "And that can be heard throughout was how Aunt Hilda started something called the end credits. It's implied that this is American Revolution."
-->"Oh, so ''that's'' why [the Parthenon is] in ruins!"\\
"Yes! Luckily, History blamed
the great fire that burned down the city.Turks."



* ''Series/AshesToAshes'' had a scene in season 3 which made Gene Hunt responsible for the vandalism to the ''Series/BluePeter'' garden in the 80s.
* ''Series/MurdochMysteries''
** A season 3 episode has Creator/HGWells in Toronto to speak at a meeting of the "Eugenics Society", a group dedicated to the improvement of humanity by scientific means. The event and the discovery that a local scientist is experimenting on animals give Wells an idea for a story about human experimentation, "...perhaps on a [[Literature/TheIslandOfDoctorMoreau remote island]]."
** A different episode had Creator/ArthurConanDoyle visiting the police station, where he finds Inspector Brackenreid is a great fan of his work. All through the episode, Brackenreid keeps telling him about an idea for a new Literature/SherlockHolmes book he had, and had thought of calling it "Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles". Doyle walks away at the end of the episode repeating the title to himself.
*** Doyle returns in a later episode, when they call him in to try and break through the delusion of a man who believes himself to be Sherlock. Doyle tries pointing out that Holmes died at Reichenbach Falls, and is taken aback when "Holmes" has a perfectly coherent explanation for both how he survived and where he's been since - the same one Doyle uses in "The Adventure of the Empty House". The episode also features a real criminal, who "Holmes" believes to be one of Moriarty's henchmen, called Sebastian Moran. Doyle mentions he likes the name.
** The episode "All That Glitters" has two: in the main story, Murdoch's investigation of the murder of an Ontario surveyor leads to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobalt_Silver_Rush Cobalt Silver Rush]]. In the B-plot, the painting Inspector Brakenreid did during his TenMinuteRetirement at the beginning of the season has been entered into a competition, and a young man is very impressed by it. The man, who particularly likes the way Brakenreid paints foliage with non-representative colours to make it stand out more (he ran out of green), eventually buys the painting for $15 to inspire his own work, at which point we learn his name is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Thomson Tom Thomson]].
* A character from ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' called "The Angel Of Destiny" was the reason Music/BritneySpears got famous.
* In ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'', the court historian is none other than Geoffrey of Monmouth, the man who wrote the King Arthur legends. Of course, that's a bit of ArtisticLicense (at best) and CriticalResearchFailure (at worst); the historical Geoffrey of Monmouth lived about 500 years after when King Arthur would have been alive (were he real-no one knows for sure). Given that the Kingdom of Camelot does not appear to even be ''on an island'', that caveat is somewhat beside the point. No one is pretending these people are English ''or'' anywhere in actual history.
* ''{{Warehouse 13}}'' loves these. Expect to hear at least two per episode. Usually in a one-line throw away gag, or even just items sitting innocently on shelves in the background.
* In ''Series/LostGirl'', the Sudanese genocide is thought to be partially attributable to the Djieiene, a mystical spider whose bite causes HatePlague[=s=].
* From the ''Series/{{Glee}}'' episode "The Rhodes Not Taken":
-->'''Emma''': A couple of years ago I started an online flirtation with an old high school flame, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan Andy]]. Things got weird and I called it off. And two months later (DramaticPause) Versace was dead. (DramaticPause) Dead.
* TheRoaringTwenties set ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'' has a few. The pilot features Arnold Rothstein cheating at poker, when eight years later he would be killed thanks to welching on a lost poker hand.
** One of Nucky's friends brags about finding a great new Italian investor in Boston. A few episodes later he's broke, and we learn that the investor's name was Charles Ponzi.
** Annoyed because of Masseria's demands to put a tax on their profits, Lucky Luciano tells Meyer Lansky that their business is "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicilian_Mafia#.22Cosa_Nostra.22_and_other_names our thing]], not his!"



* Happens in ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace''. While in 1957, Harper manages to invent both the poodle skirt and the sock hop. Max invents the high-five, but twenty years too early, so it ends up being called a "max" instead, which Alex considers a CloseEnoughTimeline.
* A quote attributed to the historical UsefulNotes/LouisXIV is, "I am the State." In fact, he said the opposite: "I depart, but the State shall always remain." In the ''Series/YoungBlades'' episode "The Girl from Upper Gaborski," [[HistoricalDomainCharacter Louis]] utters a similar quote "I am the mighty state of France!" — while flexing shirtless in the mirror and fantasizing about how to impress women. Putting the quote in the mouth of a 15-year-old SpoiledBrat / CloudCuckoolander someone who's just discovered women and the fact that he has royal power explains how the same person could say both quotes.
* ''Series/PanAm'' is prone to a few of these, as it is set in the 1960's. Examples include:
** "It's Castro's country. He'll never keep it."
** "That Music/BobDylan will be famous, mark my words."
* Perhaps a bit early to count as "historical", but the 2013 UsefulNotes/ComicRelief ''Series/TheVicarOfDibley'' skit is set during the 2012 vote by the Church of England laity as to whether to allow woman bishops. Dibley parish is inexplicably represented by Jim Trott, who's "[[VerbalTic No ... no ... no ... no ... no ... no ... yes!]]" is interpreted as meaning most of the parish council is against it. Which is why the motion was lost [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20415689 by six votes]].
* Sophia Petrillo, an immigrant from Sicily and a woman in her 80s by the time of the show, in ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'' made a lot of these. It's usually unclear if she's lying or joking, her memories have ''really'' been twisted by old age, or both. Among other things, she's claimed to have had affairs with Pablo Picasso (she ended it when she was offended by his portrait of her) and Sigmund Freud (Sophia recalls that he loved to drive through tunnels), to have been friends and business partners with Mama Celeste until they fought over a man, to have been a contestant on a game show called ''Torture'' that was hosted by Mussolini, and to have been present at the Valentine's Day Massacre with her husband and father when their car broke down in Chicago (although she does concede that it might have just been ''a'' Valentine's Day Massacre.)
** Since the entire main cast is over 50, the others all engage in this to a lesser extent. For example, Andy Rooney wanted to have an affair with Blanche but she turned him down, and Rose's high school history teacher may or may not have been Adolf Hitler after he faked his death and was hiding under an alias. The main evidence for this is that [[RefugeInAudacity Rose's high school gym teacher openly identified as Eva Braun]].
* It's something of a RunningGag in ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' for Xena and Gabrielle to inadvertently stumble across historical or mythological events or people. Among other things, Xena is revealed to have led the pirates that kidnapped Julius Caesar, Gabrielle attended a bard competition with a young Homer (no, not [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons that one]]), Xena's experience with healing inspired Hypocrites's famous Hippocratic oath, ''and'' they both fought at Troy (although between this show and Hercules the Trojan war happened at least 4 times, once against fish people). [[AnachronismStew Never mind that said events occurred and people lived many centuries apart.]] [[MST3KMantra It's all part of the fun.]]
* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'': According to Gaugin's accounts, the reason why Creator/VincentVanGogh went mad and cut off his ear was because of a [[TheMuse muse (the mythical kind).]]

to:

* Happens in ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace''. While in 1957, Harper manages to invent both ''Series/{{Sharpe}}'' comments on the poodle skirt effectiveness of his recently used and very lethal Napoleonic rocket technology:
-->'''[=Sharpe=]''': Well, Mr Giliand, I wouldn't be surprised if one day we reach
the sock hop. Max invents the high-five, but twenty years too early, so it ends up being called a "max" instead, which Alex considers a CloseEnoughTimeline.
* A quote attributed to the historical UsefulNotes/LouisXIV is, "I am the State." In fact, he said the opposite: "I depart, but the State shall always remain." In the ''Series/YoungBlades'' episode "The Girl from Upper Gaborski," [[HistoricalDomainCharacter Louis]] utters a similar quote "I am the mighty state of France!" — while flexing shirtless in the mirror and fantasizing about how to impress women. Putting the quote in the mouth of a 15-year-old SpoiledBrat / CloudCuckoolander someone who's just discovered women and the fact that he has royal power explains how the same person could say both quotes.
* ''Series/PanAm'' is prone to a few of these, as it is set in the 1960's. Examples include:
** "It's Castro's country. He'll never keep it."
** "That Music/BobDylan will be famous, mark my words."
* Perhaps a bit early to count as "historical", but the 2013 UsefulNotes/ComicRelief ''Series/TheVicarOfDibley'' skit is set during the 2012 vote by the Church of England laity as to whether to allow woman bishops. Dibley parish is inexplicably represented by Jim Trott, who's "[[VerbalTic No ... no ... no ... no ... no ... no ... yes!]]" is interpreted as meaning most of the parish council is against it. Which is why the motion was lost [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20415689 by six votes]].
* Sophia Petrillo, an immigrant from Sicily and a woman in her 80s by the time of the show, in ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'' made a lot of these. It's usually unclear if she's lying or joking, her memories have ''really'' been twisted by old age, or both. Among other things, she's claimed to have had affairs
moon with Pablo Picasso (she ended it when she was offended by his portrait one of her) and Sigmund Freud (Sophia recalls that he loved to drive through tunnels), to have been friends and business partners with Mama Celeste until they fought over a man, to have been a contestant on a game show called ''Torture'' that was hosted by Mussolini, and to have been present at the Valentine's Day Massacre with her husband and father when their car broke down in Chicago (although she does concede that it might have just been ''a'' Valentine's Day Massacre.)
** Since the entire main cast is over 50, the others all engage in this to a lesser extent. For example, Andy Rooney wanted to have an affair with Blanche but she turned him down, and Rose's high school history teacher may or may not have been Adolf Hitler after he faked his death and was hiding under an alias. The main evidence for this is that [[RefugeInAudacity Rose's high school gym teacher openly identified as Eva Braun]].
* It's something of a RunningGag in ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' for Xena and Gabrielle to inadvertently stumble across historical or mythological events or people. Among other things, Xena is revealed to have led the pirates that kidnapped Julius Caesar, Gabrielle attended a bard competition with a young Homer (no, not [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons that one]]), Xena's experience with healing inspired Hypocrites's famous Hippocratic oath, ''and'' they both fought at Troy (although between this show and Hercules the Trojan war happened at least 4 times, once against fish people). [[AnachronismStew Never mind that said events occurred and people lived many centuries apart.]] [[MST3KMantra It's all part of the fun.]]
* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'': According to Gaugin's accounts, the reason why Creator/VincentVanGogh went mad and cut off his ear was because of a [[TheMuse muse (the mythical kind).]]
your rockets.



* ''Series/ForeverKnight'' had a UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper episode, with the secret being that he was a strange, beastly vampire that [[TooSpicyForYogSothoth Lacroix couldn't fully drain]]. He also was responsible for the crimes of a few other serial killers later on. There was also a flashback encounter between Lacroix and a young German soldier/artist who turned out to be Hitler, as well as UsefulkNotes/RasputinTheMadMonk being a vampire sired by Lacroix.
* ''{{Series/Highlander}}'' has a couple of these, most notably Methos and his three buddies inspiring the legend of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Then there's the immortal who was UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII's handmaiden, and Duncan taking part in Operation Valkyrie and the Battle of Culloden...
** One of the novels references Music/ElvisPresley dying because he was an immortal and was getting too famous, only he kept popping up in different places, explaining the Elvis sightings.

to:

* ''Series/ForeverKnight'' had a UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper episode, with ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' [[Recap/StarTrekS2E14WolfInTheFold "Wolf in the Fold"]] revealed
the secret being that he truth behind UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper: He was Redjac, a strange, beastly vampire that [[TooSpicyForYogSothoth Lacroix couldn't fully drain]]. He also was responsible for the crimes of PuppeteerParasite which has been a few other serial killers later on. There was also a flashback encounter between Lacroix killer on several planets, including Earth.
** The two-part episode ''Time's Arrow'' in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' has Data accidentally sent back to 1893 San Francisco where he meets the author Creator/MarkTwain
and a young German soldier/artist bellhop named Jack London, who turned has an inexplicable desire to visit Alaska.
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
*** In the episode "Trials and Tribble-ations", they actually did this to a bit of ''Star Trek'''s own history -- in something much more than a simple ContinuityNod, the episode revealed that there was much more going on in the background of the [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries original series]] episode "The Trouble with Tribbles" than was initially seen by viewers in the 1960s. Also, the scene of Tribbles continuing to fall down on Kirk's head, one every ten seconds or so, long after the storage compartment had been opened and most of the tribbles had fallen out proves to be the [=DS9=] team's tossing Tribbles aside once scanned.
*** In the episode "LittleGreenMen", where the [[RoswellThatEndsWell Roswell aliens]] turn
out to be Hitler, Ferengi.
** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
*** In the episode "Flashback", Tuvok [[FlashBack flashes back]] to his service aboard the ''Excelsior''... during the time of ''Film/{{Star Trek VI|The Undiscovered Country}}''. He's even the one who gave Sulu the tea that we see knocked over at the beginning of the movie. Interestingly, since the original ''Trek'' actors had aged a good bit, many scenes that happened exactly
as well as UsefulkNotes/RasputinTheMadMonk seen in ''Star Trek VI'' had to be redone (or else, Sulu ages ten years once original footage kicks in). Watch 'em back to back and you'll notice the tiniest differences, like the way Valtane's hand moves when he puts it on the railing, or Sulu saying "Shields! Shields!" a bit more loudly, or a few camera angles being different. Also, the ''Excelsior'''s warp engines only glow in original (i.e., "shot for the show") footage, as a vampire sired new model's being used -- although the nacelles of the movie model were wired to glow, they didn't.
*** An incident occurred during the filming of the above episode that is either the greatest historical in-joke, or the luckiest accident, of ''Star Trek'' history. During the flashback sequences, we see Dimitri Valtane die, despite his chronologically later appearance at the end of ''Star Trek VI''. [[WordOfGod The writers]] jokingly suggested he had a twin brother serving on the same ship, but the general {{fanon}} response was that he had been successfully resuscitated off screen. The former is now accepted as correct, however, because in the opening scenes of ''Star Trek VI'', because of a poor editing job, Valtane is seen to be manning two separate consoles on opposite sides of the bridge. Only one of him appears at the end, so the twin theory is actually the best solution.
*** In the two-parter "Future's End" the Digital Revolution only happens because of a crashed timeship.
** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pulled a cute one in the episode "Carbon Creek". ''Star Trek'' {{canon}} states that humanity met the Vulcans in the late 21st century after Cochrane's warp flight. Apparently, a little-known fact is that a Vulcan survey ship crashed in Pennsylvania in the '50s. A Vulcan woman raises money for a boy to go to college
by Lacroix.
* ''{{Series/Highlander}}'' has
introducing the bank owner to a couple strangely adhesive fabric, [[ETGaveUsWiFi better known as Velcro]], invented in the real world by "George" de Mestral. (The name of these, most notably Methos one of the Vulcans? Mestral.)
* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this a few times. One instance had Jackie being annoyed because a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on the news. In another case involving wrestling, wrestler Rocky Johnson talks with Red and Eric about his own son,
and his three buddies inspiring belief that he'd grow up to be the legend most [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson electrifying man in all of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Then there's the immortal who was UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII's handmaiden, and Duncan taking part in Operation Valkyrie and the Battle of Culloden...
** One of the novels references Music/ElvisPresley dying because he was an immortal and was getting too famous, only he kept popping up in different places, explaining the Elvis sightings.
wrestling.]] Red wishes him sarcastic good luck with that.



* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this a few times. One instance had Jackie being annoyed because a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on the news. In another case involving wrestling, wrestler Rocky Johnson talks with Red and Eric about his own son, and his belief that he'd grow up to be the most [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson electrifying man in all of wrestling.]] Red wishes him sarcastic good luck with that.

to:

* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this Perhaps a few times. One instance had Jackie bit early to count as "historical", but the 2013 UsefulNotes/ComicRelief ''Series/TheVicarOfDibley'' skit is set during the 2012 vote by the Church of England laity as to whether to allow woman bishops. Dibley parish is inexplicably represented by Jim Trott, who's "[[VerbalTic No ... no ... no ... no ... no ... no ... yes!]]" is interpreted as meaning most of the parish council is against it. Which is why the motion was lost [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20415689 by six votes]].
* ''{{Warehouse 13}}'' loves these. Expect to hear at least two per episode. Usually in a one-line throw away gag, or even just items sitting innocently on shelves in the background.
* Happens in ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace''. While in 1957, Harper manages to invent both the poodle skirt and the sock hop. Max invents the high-five, but twenty years too early, so it ends up
being annoyed because called a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on "max" instead, which Alex considers a CloseEnoughTimeline.
* A quote attributed to
the news. historical UsefulNotes/LouisXIV is, "I am the State." In another case involving wrestling, wrestler Rocky Johnson talks with Red fact, he said the opposite: "I depart, but the State shall always remain." In the ''Series/YoungBlades'' episode "The Girl from Upper Gaborski," [[HistoricalDomainCharacter Louis]] utters a similar quote "I am the mighty state of France!" — while flexing shirtless in the mirror and Eric fantasizing about his own son, how to impress women. Putting the quote in the mouth of a 15-year-old SpoiledBrat / CloudCuckoolander someone who's just discovered women and his belief the fact that he'd grow he has royal power explains how the same person could say both quotes.
* It's something of a RunningGag in ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' for Xena and Gabrielle to inadvertently stumble across historical or mythological events or people. Among other things, Xena is revealed to have led the pirates that kidnapped Julius Caesar, Gabrielle attended a bard competition with a young Homer (no, not [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons that one]]), Xena's experience with healing inspired Hypocrites's famous Hippocratic oath, ''and'' they both fought at Troy (although between this show and Hercules the Trojan war happened at least 4 times, once against fish people). [[AnachronismStew Never mind that said events occurred and people lived many centuries apart.]] [[MST3KMantra It's all part of the fun.]]
* ''Series/TheXFiles'', "Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man", shows the CSM writing a fictionalized account of a mysterious government operative (himself) assassinating JFK and MLK. However, it is strongly implied that much of the story is made
up to be make him seem more important. He also gives a standing order for the most [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson electrifying man Bills to never win a Super Bowl, which explains a lot.[[note]]CSM's operatives have been following his order a little too zealously. Since the episode aired in all 1996, the Bills haven't even won a playoff game.[[/note]] He also apparently drugged the Russian goalie during the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" when the US men's hockey team beat the far superior Russian squad.
* ''Series/YoungIndianaJones'' sees Indy meeting virtually every major historical figure
of wrestling.]] Red wishes him sarcastic good luck with that.the early 20th century before his 21st birthday.
6th Feb '17 7:46:31 AM superkeijikun
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* ''VideoGame/{{Yakuza 0}}'' takes place during Japan's "Bubble Economy", a period of economic prosperity. One of Goro Majima's sidequests involves rescuing a politician being attacked by store owners for wanting to implement a sales tax. Afterwards, Majima talks with the politician and makes some suggestions which, in retrospect, would be implemented only a few years later and result in the "Lost Decade", a severe economic recession that Japan is still recovering from to this day.
2nd Feb '17 12:21:55 AM unokkun
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Added DiffLines:

*** Tolkien ''probably'' did not intend that reference as this trope: the Akallabêth (included in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'') is a reimagining of the Atlantis story, which (as also happened to ''Literature/TheHobbit'' / ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'') [[CanonWelding got dragged]] into the same canon as ''The Silmarillion''. The name ''Atalantë'' ([[ConLang actual Quenya]] for "The Downfallen") is far from the first linguistic pun in Tolkien's work.
12th Jan '17 2:43:29 PM Abracadabrantes
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Added DiffLines:

** A series of missions in ''Unity'' has Arno protecting Désirée Clary, then Napoleon's fiancée, with the help of Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte, who ends up falling for her over the course of the missions. In later years, Bernadotte became a massive thorn in Napoleon's side and Désirée's influence was probably one of the reasons why he was never disgraced or even imprisoned.
11th Jan '17 12:35:32 AM PsychoGecko
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* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this a few times. One instance had Jackie being annoyed because a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on the news. In another case involving wrestling, wrestler Rocky Maivia talks with Red and Eric about his own son, and his belief that he'd grow up to be the most [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson electrifying man in all of wrestling.]] Red wishes him sarcastic good luck with that.

to:

* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this a few times. One instance had Jackie being annoyed because a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on the news. In another case involving wrestling, wrestler Rocky Maivia Johnson talks with Red and Eric about his own son, and his belief that he'd grow up to be the most [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson electrifying man in all of wrestling.]] Red wishes him sarcastic good luck with that.
11th Jan '17 12:34:20 AM PsychoGecko
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* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this a few times. One instance had Jackie being annoyed because a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on the news.

to:

* ''Series/That70sShow'' did this a few times. One instance had Jackie being annoyed because a regular television program she watched wasn't airing as usual because it was bumped by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_hostage_crisis some hostage crisis]] being on the news. In another case involving wrestling, wrestler Rocky Maivia talks with Red and Eric about his own son, and his belief that he'd grow up to be the most [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson electrifying man in all of wrestling.]] Red wishes him sarcastic good luck with that.
26th Dec '16 8:39:37 PM nombretomado
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* ''AshesToAshes'' had a scene in season 3 which made Gene Hunt responsible for the vandalism to the ''Series/BluePeter'' garden in the 80s.

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* ''AshesToAshes'' ''Series/AshesToAshes'' had a scene in season 3 which made Gene Hunt responsible for the vandalism to the ''Series/BluePeter'' garden in the 80s.
21st Dec '16 1:04:10 AM TheMike
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* The Bakumatsu chapter of ''VideoGame/LiveALive'' sees the ninja Oboro-maru set out to stop a man named Ode Iou from throwing Japan into war by infiltrating his castle, rescuing a man he has prisoner, and killing him. The man turns out to be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakamoto_Ry%C5%8Dma Ryoma Sakamoto]], and you have the option of joining him at the end of the chapter. If you choose to, Oboro-maru becomes Sakamoto's bodyguard, and is seen stopping an assassination attempt. In real life, Ryoma Sakamoto was assassinated.
17th Dec '16 9:10:41 PM jormis29
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* In the 1931 film ''Film/WaterlooBridge'', the setting is around 1917. Th characters joke about Americans, and the idea of prohibition. They laugh and say it never will happen. Well, guess what was still ravaging on in American in 1931?

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* In the 1931 film ''Film/WaterlooBridge'', the setting is around 1917. Th The characters joke about Americans, and the idea of prohibition. They laugh and say it never will happen. Well, guess what was still ravaging on in American in 1931?
17th Dec '16 7:20:15 PM LongTallShorty64
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* In the 1931 film ''Film/WaterlooBridge'', the setting is around 1917. Th characters joke about Americans, and the idea of prohibition. They laugh and say it never will happen. Well, guess what was still ravaging on in American in 1931?
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HistoricalInJoke