History Main / HiroshimaAsAUnitOfMeasure

2nd Jan '17 11:24:30 PM TheSinful
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In ''FanFic/ThisBites'', [[spoiler:when they notice that the Going Merry's ''talking'' audibly on the SBS, Pekoms says he wants no part of seizing the ship even if Big Mom wants it, stating that the antics of the Straw Hat crew are ''Emperor'' levels of crazy. At ''minimum.'']]

to:

* In ''FanFic/ThisBites'', [[spoiler:when they notice that the Going Merry's ''talking'' audibly on the SBS, Pekoms says he wants no part of seizing the ship even if Big Mom wants it, stating that the antics of the Straw Hat crew are ''Emperor'' levels of crazy. At ''minimum.'']]'']]
* Louise and Cattleya measure how mean someone is in ''Fanfic/{{Overlady}}'' using Centi-Eleanores aka one hundredth as mean as their eldest sister Eleanore. Louise is shocked when Cattleya describes someone as being worth 80 Centi-Eleanores, given that most don't even reach 20.
21st Dec '16 7:29:51 AM kyojikasshu
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Technology discussion boards have used "Libraries of Congress," in reference to the physical U.S. legislative library of the same name, as a measure of storage capacity. Various actual figures are occasionally tossed around as a baseline (often hovering in the tens of terabytes), but they vary widely, and now that people with a cursory knowledge of computers are familiar with kilo, mega, giga and terabytes, the term is now used as a joke more often than not. An [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O818btW2PYY IBM commercial]] even had Creator/AveryBrooks pose the question, "How many Libraries of Congress per second can your software handle?"

to:

* Technology discussion boards have used "Libraries of Congress," in reference to the physical U.S. legislative library of the same name, as a measure of storage capacity. Various actual figures are occasionally tossed around as a baseline (often hovering in the tens of terabytes), but they vary widely, and now that people with a cursory knowledge of computers are familiar with kilo, mega, giga and terabytes, the term is now used as a joke more often than not. An [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O818btW2PYY IBM commercial]] even had Creator/AveryBrooks Avery Brooks pose the question, "How many Libraries of Congress per second can your software handle?"
21st Dec '16 7:29:17 AM kyojikasshu
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Technology discussion boards have used "Libraries of Congress," in reference to the physical U.S. legislative library of the same name, as a measure of storage capacity. Various actual figures are occasionally tossed around as a baseline (often hovering in the tens of terabytes), but they vary widely, and now that people with a cursory knowledge of computers are familiar with kilo, mega, giga and terabytes, the term is now used as a joke more often than not.

to:

* Technology discussion boards have used "Libraries of Congress," in reference to the physical U.S. legislative library of the same name, as a measure of storage capacity. Various actual figures are occasionally tossed around as a baseline (often hovering in the tens of terabytes), but they vary widely, and now that people with a cursory knowledge of computers are familiar with kilo, mega, giga and terabytes, the term is now used as a joke more often than not. An [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O818btW2PYY IBM commercial]] even had Creator/AveryBrooks pose the question, "How many Libraries of Congress per second can your software handle?"
9th Dec '16 3:22:20 AM iroanxi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Fan Works]]
In ''FanFic/ThisBites'', [[spoiler:when they notice that the Going Merry's ''talking'' audibly on the SBS, Pekoms says he wants no part of seizing the ship even if Big Mom wants it, stating that the antics of the Straw Hat crew are ''Emperor'' levels of crazy. At ''minimum.'']]
[[/folder]]
29th Nov '16 12:50:59 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the UnitedKingdom, volume is sometimes measured in Albert Halls (and as [[Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand The Beatles]] told us, 1 Albert Hall = 4000 Holes).

to:

** In the UnitedKingdom, volume is sometimes measured in Albert Halls (and as [[Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand The Beatles]] Music/TheBeatles told us, us in ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand'', 1 Albert Hall = 4000 Holes).
24th Sep '16 8:01:08 AM tracer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Many common units of measurements likely started this way. For example, an "atm" is the pressure of sea level Earth's atmosphere, a "bar" is an amount of pressure about that of Earth's atmosphere, but consistent with metric units. Temperature scales were based on boiling and freezing points of water -- Celsius sets 0° and 100° at those points for distilled water, while Fahrenheit originally had 32° as the freezing point of water and 96° as human body temperature.[[note]]Fahrenheit gave 32° as the freezing point of water, 96° as the average body temperature of a human being, and 212° as the boiling point of water. However, scientists who came after him could not set a scale that got all three of those values to correctly line up with the things they were measuring, so they took the two they could measure precisely -- the freezing and boiling points of water -- and adjusted the third accordingly, giving us the modern standard of 98.6° for human body temperature.[[/note]]

to:

* Many common units of measurements likely started this way. For example, an "atm" is the pressure of sea level Earth's atmosphere, a "bar" is an amount of pressure about that of Earth's atmosphere, but consistent with metric units. Temperature scales were based on boiling and freezing points of water -- Celsius sets 0° and 100° at those points for distilled water, while Fahrenheit originally had 32° as the freezing point of water and 96° as human body temperature.[[note]]Fahrenheit gave 32° as the freezing point of water, 96° as the average body temperature of a human being, and 212° as the boiling point of water. However, scientists who came after him could not set a scale that got all three of those values to correctly line up with the things they were measuring, so they took the two they could measure precisely -- the freezing and boiling points of water -- and adjusted the third accordingly, giving us the modern standard of 98.6° for human body temperature.[[/note]] (And human body temperature varies enough from individual to individual that the best you can say is that it's 37°C plus-or-minus 1°C; 98.6°F is a ridiculously overprecise value.)[[/note]]
24th Sep '16 7:57:22 AM tracer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The temperature on Venus is typically described as "hot enough to melt lead".

to:

* The temperature on Venus is typically described as either "hot enough to melt lead".lead" or "hotter than a self-cleaning oven".
5th Sep '16 1:27:58 AM LucaEarlgrey
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Elementary school mathematics textbooks, such as those by Houghton Mifflin, will teach students the basics of length measurement by having them use "paper-clip units", i.e. measuring how long something is by lining up identically-sized paper clips along the length of an object, or simply using a tear-out ruler from a workbook with paper clip graphics printed on it.
27th Jul '16 3:52:58 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Used as a question in TheBBC Radio 4 cryptic quiz show ''Round Britain Quiz'': "If London buses times Jumbo jets equal Wales, why would Wales times Eiffel Towers offer a field of contest to Phelps and Spitz?" (Length times width equals area, and area times height equals volume, measured in Olympic swimming pools.)

to:

* Used as a question in TheBBC Creator/TheBBC Radio 4 cryptic quiz show ''Round Britain Quiz'': "If London buses times Jumbo jets equal Wales, why would Wales times Eiffel Towers offer a field of contest to Phelps and Spitz?" (Length times width equals area, and area times height equals volume, measured in Olympic swimming pools.)
23rd Jul '16 4:30:44 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There is a story by CarlBarks with DonaldDuck and his nephews, where they are travelling into space via a virtual machine [[WesternAnimation/DuckTales Gyro Gearloose]] made. Donald takes them to bigger places where he recreates earthly stuff on vast scales, constantly using comparative scales for his nephews and the readers to grasp. This is mixed with using objects of continuously lesser scales -- first insects, than dust, snowflakes, etc -- surpassing them. The story is called 'Donald's Big Imagination'. A grasshopper from Betelgeuse is imagined having 5 ocean liners on its back and the circumference of the star uses a time-scale analogy, namely "Earth's fastest rocket takes 100 years to fly around it".

to:

* There is a story by CarlBarks Creator/CarlBarks with DonaldDuck WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck and his nephews, where they are travelling into space via a virtual machine [[WesternAnimation/DuckTales Gyro Gearloose]] made. Donald takes them to bigger places where he recreates earthly stuff on vast scales, constantly using comparative scales for his nephews and the readers to grasp. This is mixed with using objects of continuously lesser scales -- first insects, than dust, snowflakes, etc -- surpassing them. The story is called 'Donald's Big Imagination'. A grasshopper from Betelgeuse is imagined having 5 ocean liners on its back and the circumference of the star uses a time-scale analogy, namely "Earth's fastest rocket takes 100 years to fly around it".
This list shows the last 10 events of 397. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HiroshimaAsAUnitOfMeasure