History Main / GrowingUpSucks

19th Sep '16 8:32:12 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played with in the Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality series. In "On a Pale Horse," babies (except those born from rape, hardship or some other sin) are all inherently bound for Heaven. Those born in sin are undecided. As soon as they reach a certain age, their free will takes over and they may end up in Heaven or Hell based on their decisions and actions.
8th Sep '16 5:09:01 PM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Some TruthInTelevision here, as plenty of girls do give up (or are forced to give up) horses for boys, college, or marriage and a family of their own. Many of them return to the sport later if their time and resources allow it. Some wind up moving to a city and cannot keep horses any more, but go back to riding in midlife. (Plus some larger cities have places -- usually parks -- where you can keep horses and ride.)

to:

** Some TruthInTelevision here, as plenty of girls do give up (or are forced to give up) horses for boys, college, or marriage and a family of their own. Many of them return to the sport later if their time and resources allow it. Some wind up moving to a city and cannot keep horses any more, but go back to riding in midlife. (Plus some larger cities have places -- usually parks -- where you can keep horses and ride. Grant Park in Chicago and Central Park in New York are famous for this.)
25th Jul '16 2:53:51 PM Taskmaster123
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

Happens ''a great deal'' in the real world when someone leaves adolescence and their teen-age years behind and realizes that while childhood is not always a picnic; things are different when mom and dad aren't paying their bills anymore, and they have to find a place to live, buy health insurance, work at a job they may not like in order to have money in the bank, and otherwise deal with all the things that made their parents so uncool and boring. One of the first steps into being a full-fledged adult is realizing all the sacrifices your parents had to make and the insane hoops they had to jump through to keep a roof over your head and food on the table...
10th Jul '16 10:39:46 PM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Engel}} also has this...[[spoiler: Although the Engel believe themselves to be Angels sent by god, the truth is that they are children enhanced by nanites and surgery to be superpowered defenders of the people. As they grow older, it becomes harder to pass as sexless celestial beings, and the brainwashing wears off. So before this happens, the church returns the Engel to Heaven... funny thing is, without all the drugs and hypnotic suggestion, the gates to Heaven look a hell of a lot more like a furnace.]]

to:

* {{Engel}} ''TabletopGame/{{Engel}}'' also has this...this. [[spoiler: Although the Engel believe themselves to be Angels sent by god, the truth is that they are children enhanced by nanites and surgery to be superpowered defenders of the people. As they grow older, it becomes harder to pass as sexless celestial beings, and the brainwashing wears off. So before this happens, the church returns the Engel to Heaven... funny thing is, without all the drugs and hypnotic suggestion, the gates to Heaven look a hell of a lot more like a furnace.]]


















26th Jun '16 1:42:32 AM bt8257
Is there an issue? Send a Message


May result in a viewer having a "Screw that!" moment, leading to selective FanonDisContinuity.

to:

May result in a viewer having a "Screw that!" moment, leading to selective FanonDisContinuity.
FanonDiscontinuity.
21st Jun '16 12:32:25 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played with in the IncarnationsOfImmortality series. In "On a Pale Horse," babies (except those born from rape, hardship or some other sin) are all inherently bound for Heaven. Those born in sin are undecided. As soon as they reach a certain age, their free will takes over and they may end up in Heaven or Hell based on their decisions and actions.

to:

* Played with in the IncarnationsOfImmortality Literature/IncarnationsOfImmortality series. In "On a Pale Horse," babies (except those born from rape, hardship or some other sin) are all inherently bound for Heaven. Those born in sin are undecided. As soon as they reach a certain age, their free will takes over and they may end up in Heaven or Hell based on their decisions and actions.
26th May '16 3:02:52 PM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* One of the most popular strips in {{Zits}} has Jeremy's mom grabbing him, unzip his body to reveal his six-year-old self. Then they spend several panels doing whatever activities a six-year-old would do with his mother (but a teen wouldn't be caught dead doing) before going back in his body and zipping it back up.

to:

* One of the most popular strips in {{Zits}} ComicStrip/{{Zits}} has Jeremy's mom grabbing him, unzip his body to reveal his six-year-old self. Then they spend several panels doing whatever activities a six-year-old would do with his mother (but a teen wouldn't be caught dead doing) before going back in his body and zipping it back up.
18th May '16 2:07:36 PM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Epitomized in this monologue from ''NightCourt'': "I don't know what's real anymore. When I was young, my mother told me Santa Claus was real. But when I got older... she told me he wasn't. One book says Jesus is real; one book says he isn't. We're living in the greatest country in the world... and we're murdering each other in the streets. What did they expect when they made us believe in the tooth fairy and the Easter Bunny then gave us the nuclear bomb to play with. Hey diddle diddle the cat and the fiddle is a lie like all the rest, the astronauts killed the man in the moon, growing up took care of the rest." Made sadder because the speaker is a friend of Harry's dad Buddy-- and mentally ill (he spends most of the episode not talking at all).

to:

* Epitomized in this monologue from ''NightCourt'': ''Series/NightCourt'': "I don't know what's real anymore. When I was young, my mother told me Santa Claus was real. But when I got older... she told me he wasn't. One book says Jesus is real; one book says he isn't. We're living in the greatest country in the world... and we're murdering each other in the streets. What did they expect when they made us believe in the tooth fairy and the Easter Bunny then gave us the nuclear bomb to play with. Hey diddle diddle the cat and the fiddle is a lie like all the rest, the astronauts killed the man in the moon, growing up took care of the rest." Made sadder because the speaker is a friend of Harry's dad Buddy-- and mentally ill (he spends most of the episode not talking at all).
6th May '16 12:40:54 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A touching scene from ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'' shows this trope from a different angle when we learn the past of [[AffirmativeActionGirl Jessie, a toy cowgirl]]. She started off being Emily's best friend, but as the girl grows up, Jessie is forgotten and eventually donated. Being reminded that Andy will eventually outgrow him is enough to temporarily convince Woody that living on display in a toy museum is better than being loved temporarily by a child.

to:

* ''Franchise/ToyStory'':
**
A touching scene from ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'' shows this trope from a different angle when we learn the past of [[AffirmativeActionGirl Jessie, a toy cowgirl]]. She started off being Emily's best friend, but as the girl grows up, Jessie is forgotten and eventually donated. Being reminded that Andy will eventually outgrow him is enough to temporarily convince Woody that living on display in a toy museum is better than being loved temporarily by a child.









* In ''HisDarkMaterials'', the changeover from childhood to maturity is marked not with a loss of the child's powers, but that of their daemon -- they lose their ShapeShifting ability and remain in one form for their rest of their life. Given that the daemon is an anima/animus of the child, however, this development is directly linked to their bonded human rather than the daemon. Most likely a metaphor for "becoming set in your ways", the lack of prejudice and adaptability children are supposed to have being sacrificed for the reassurance of a firm identity - and this is treated as a joyous occasion by the two main characters.
** If anything HisDarkMaterials subverts. The entire theme of the series is pretty much "Growing up has its compensations."
** Although [[spoiler:Lyra does lose the ability to read the alethiometer, and of course only grown-ups are vulnerable to the Spectres]].

to:

* In ''HisDarkMaterials'', ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'', the changeover from childhood to maturity is marked not with a loss of the child's powers, but that of their daemon -- they lose their ShapeShifting ability and remain in one form for their rest of their life. Given that the daemon is an anima/animus of the child, however, this development is directly linked to their bonded human rather than the daemon. Most likely a metaphor for "becoming set in your ways", the lack of prejudice and adaptability children are supposed to have being sacrificed for the reassurance of a firm identity - and this is treated as a joyous occasion by the two main characters.
**
characters. If anything HisDarkMaterials ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'' subverts. The entire theme of the series is pretty much "Growing up has its compensations."
**
" Although [[spoiler:Lyra does lose the ability to read the alethiometer, and of course only grown-ups are vulnerable to the Spectres]].



* In the ''Literature/MaryPoppins'' book series, everyone in the world is born with the ability to communicate telepathically with animals and to remember the strange spiritual journey which led them to their moment of birth. People lose this ability and forget everything that happens to them in their early infancy once they begin talking. (Mary Poppins has somehow managed to retain both her early memories and abilities, which is how she communicates with both animals ''and'' with the younger, pre-toddler-age Banks children.)
** It's always vaguely implied (and definitely Fanon) that while the Banks family and the world they live in is human, Mary herself is supernatural. A popular theory is that she's a fairy of some sort, temporarily exiled from her usual world (which is why she comes and goes from the Banks' lives like she does). It would certainly explain a lot about her, if it's true.

to:

* In the ''Literature/MaryPoppins'' book series, everyone in the world is born with the ability to communicate telepathically with animals and to remember the strange spiritual journey which led them to their moment of birth. People lose this ability and forget everything that happens to them in their early infancy once they begin talking. (Mary Poppins has somehow managed to retain both her early memories and abilities, which is how she communicates with both animals ''and'' with the younger, pre-toddler-age Banks children.)
**
) It's always vaguely implied (and definitely Fanon) that while the Banks family and the world they live in is human, Mary herself is supernatural. A popular theory is that she's a fairy of some sort, temporarily exiled from her usual world (which is why she comes and goes from the Banks' lives like she does). It would certainly explain a lot about her, if it's true.









* "I Won't Grow Up" from Creator/{{Disney}}'s {{film}} and musical of ''Theatre/PeterPan''.
** Rendered as a cheerily anarchic [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12IV1I0lqXg punk rock tune]] by The Fools, and by Sloppy Seconds.

to:

* "I Won't Grow Up" from Creator/{{Disney}}'s {{film}} [[Disney/PeterPan film]] and musical of ''Theatre/PeterPan''.
**
''Theatre/PeterPan''. Rendered as a cheerily anarchic [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12IV1I0lqXg punk rock tune]] by The Fools, and by Sloppy Seconds.


Added DiffLines:

* "The Happy Birthday Song" by Arrogant Worms is a very negative but [[LyricalDissonance cheerful]] birthday song about how life becomes boring and repetitive the longer you live, and that you will die someday.
4th May '16 7:34:17 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Shounen Note'' is about a [[ChildProdigy prodigious]] boy soprano at the cusp of puberty. His voice will pretty soon start cracking and he'll loose his talent. He says he can still sing but another boy soprano notes it won't be the same as it was when he was a soprano.
* Manga/OyasumiPunpun has a ''very'' dark take on this. It treats growing up as a process of disillusionment for many of the characters, where they lose sight of their dreams, realize ugly truths about themselves, and suffer from personal loss and doubt. This is especially noticeable with the protagonist, who gradually loses his innocence due to the abuse, indifference, callousness and pettiness he experiences growing up and becomes a much worse person as a result.

to:

* ''Shounen Note'' ''Manga/ShounenNote'' is about a [[ChildProdigy prodigious]] boy soprano at the cusp of puberty. His Yutaka's voice will pretty soon start cracking and he'll loose his talent. soprano abilities. He says notes he can still sing but another Vladimir (who is also a boy soprano soprano) notes it won't be the same as it was when he was a soprano.
* Manga/OyasumiPunpun ''Manga/OyasumiPunpun'' has a ''very'' dark take on this. It treats growing up as a process of disillusionment for many of the characters, where they lose sight of their dreams, realize ugly truths about themselves, and suffer from personal loss and doubt. This is especially noticeable with the protagonist, who gradually loses his innocence due to the abuse, indifference, callousness and pettiness he experiences growing up and becomes a much worse person as a result.
This list shows the last 10 events of 129. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GrowingUpSucks