History Main / GimmickMatches

24th Apr '16 5:26:53 AM ArcaneAzmadi
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** The infamous Hell in a Cell between Wrestling/MickFoley and Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''Wrestling/KingOfTheRing '98'' involved Foley taking two big falls: once getting thrown off the top of the 20-foot cage into the SpanishAnnouncersTable, and then (while badly injured from that first bump) getting chokeslammed ''through'' the roof of the cell. Until WWE started toning things down for safety reasons, attempts to replicate the HolyShitQuotient of that match were common.

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** The infamous Hell in a Cell between Wrestling/MickFoley and Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''Wrestling/KingOfTheRing '98'' involved Foley taking two big falls: once getting thrown off the top of the 20-foot 16-foot cage into the SpanishAnnouncersTable, and then (while badly injured from that first bump) getting chokeslammed ''through'' the roof of the cell. Until WWE started toning things down for safety reasons, attempts to replicate the HolyShitQuotient of that match were common.
2nd Apr '16 4:47:06 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Note that when British Freestyle wrestling was big, back in the '70s and '80s ''all'' its matches were best out of three, or as Brian Crabtree (the MC) always put it "Two falls, two submissions or a knockout to decide the winner." Hence the ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' sketch "The Wrestling Epilogue", with a priest and a professor getting into the ring together, "The existence or otherwise of God to be decided by two falls, two submissions or a knockout". You can see it on Youtube [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBEP5c-SUEQ here]]. Hence also the line in ''Literature/GoodOmens'' "Three rounds, one Fall, no submission" to describe the war between Heaven and Hell. 2 out of 3 remains the standard match in Mexican ''lucha libre'' (but not every where in the Spanish speaking or Latin world)

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** Note that when British Freestyle wrestling was big, back in the '70s and '80s ''all'' its matches were best out of three, or as Brian Crabtree (the MC) always put it "Two falls, two submissions or a knockout to decide the winner." Hence the ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' sketch "The Wrestling Epilogue", with a priest and a professor getting into the ring together, "The existence or otherwise of God to be decided by two falls, two submissions or a knockout". You can see it on Youtube [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBEP5c-SUEQ here]]. Hence also the line in ''Literature/GoodOmens'' "Three rounds, one Fall, no submission" to describe the war between Heaven and Hell. 2 out of 3 remains the standard match in Mexican ''lucha libre'' (but not every where everywhere in the Spanish speaking or Latin world)



** ''Relevos Australianos'' -- a three on three minimum match where each team has a captain and victory is achieved either by be eliminating one team's captain or by eliminating all of a captain's teammates. Despite the name, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff it is more commonly seen in Mexico]] than Australia.

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** ''Relevos Australianos'' -- a three on three minimum match where each team has a captain and victory is achieved either by be eliminating one team's captain or by eliminating all of a captain's teammates. Despite the name, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff it is more commonly seen in Mexico]] than Australia.



** Rounds tend to be an unpopular gimmick, with The American Wrestling Federation's attempt to revive them in the USA instead nearly killing it off for good there. The format has remained somewhat popular in some regions such as the UK, however.

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** Rounds tend to be an unpopular gimmick, with The American Wrestling Federation's attempt to revive them in the USA instead nearly killing it off for good there. The format has remained somewhat popular in some regions such as the UK, however.however, [[FanNickname leading many to these]] "British Rounds Matches".



** WWE has the ''Money in the Bank'' Match, originally at Wrestling/WrestleMania, but now with [[Wrestling/MoneyInTheBank its own PPV]]; anywhere from six to ten wrestlers compete at once, and the prize being hung above the ring is a briefcase, inside which is a contract which the winner can use to get a world championship match anytime he wants within one calendar year of winning it. Almost every time the contract has been cashed in, the one doing the cashing won the title, usually by doing so right after the current champion has taken a nasty beating from a previous challenger and is in little to no condition to fight back. There were only two exceptions to the battered champion strategy. The first was Wrestling/RobVanDam's cashing against then-WWE Champion Wrestling/JohnCena at ECW One Night Stand, which RVD announced weeks beforehand and simply gave him "homefield" advantage. The other was on the 1000th episode of Raw where Cena did the same to Wrestling/CMPunk. Only twice has the briefcase holder lost the cash-in match; first with the aforementioned Cena match and the second time with Wrestling/DamienSandow. Most winners of the Money in the Bank match have been heels: only RVD, CM Punk (twice), Wrestling/{{Kane}}, Daniel Bryan, Cena, and Wrestling/RandyOrton have won the match as faces, and in the cases of Punk the second time, Kane, Bryan, and Orton, turned heel very shortly (or in Orton's case, immediately) after winning the title.

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** WWE has the ''Money in the Bank'' Match, originally at Wrestling/WrestleMania, but now later with [[Wrestling/MoneyInTheBank its own PPV]]; anywhere from six to ten wrestlers compete at once, and the prize being hung above the ring is a briefcase, inside which is a contract which the winner can use to get a world championship match anytime he wants within one calendar year of winning it. Almost every time the contract has been cashed in, the one doing the cashing won the title, usually by doing so right after the current champion has taken a nasty beating from a previous challenger and is in little to no condition to fight back. There were only two exceptions to the battered champion strategy. The first was Wrestling/RobVanDam's cashing against then-WWE Champion Wrestling/JohnCena at ECW One Night Stand, which RVD announced weeks beforehand and simply gave him "homefield" advantage. The other was on the 1000th episode of Raw where Cena did the same to Wrestling/CMPunk. Only twice has the briefcase holder lost the cash-in match; first with the aforementioned Cena match and the second time with Wrestling/DamienSandow. Most winners of the Money in the Bank match have been heels: only RVD, CM Punk (twice), Wrestling/{{Kane}}, Daniel Bryan, Cena, and Wrestling/RandyOrton have won the match as faces, and in the cases of Punk the second time, Kane, Bryan, and Orton, turned heel very shortly (or in Orton's case, immediately) after winning the title.


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** Wrestling/KenShamrock has hosted professional wrestling matches in his mixed martial arts training facility "The Lion's Den", which naturally uses a multi sided cage rather than a squared circle wrestling ring.


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** The WWF did a variation of a no disqualification "empty arena" contest called a "Dungeon Match", where Wrestling/OwenHart challenged Wrestling/KenShamrock to come to his basement (AKA the legendary Hart Family Dungeon) for a fight.
27th Mar '16 7:20:18 AM Gimere
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* ''Iron Man'' -- This match goes on for a predetermined length of time, and continues even if a wrestler scores a pinfall, submission, or other decision; instead, each decision counts as a point, and the wrestler with the most points in the end wins. Tropes: Like the 2-out-of-3 falls match, [[DownToTheLastPlay this one usually ends up tied until the closing minutes of the bout.]] At any point when it is not tied (until the closing moments) the {{face}} is always behind. Sometimes if it is tied at the bell, everyone is confused, {{Calvinball}} kicks in, someone wins and the loser complains. The ''Ultimate Submission'' match is a variant of the Iron Man match where only submissions count for points.

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* ''Iron Man'' -- This match goes on for a predetermined length of time, time[[note]]often, though not always, one hour[[/note]], and continues even if a wrestler scores a pinfall, submission, or other decision; instead, each decision counts as a point, and the wrestler with the most points in the end wins. Tropes: Like the 2-out-of-3 falls match, [[DownToTheLastPlay this one usually ends up tied until the closing minutes of the bout.]] At any point when it is not tied (until the closing moments) the {{face}} is always behind. Sometimes if it is tied at the bell, everyone is confused, {{Calvinball}} kicks in, someone wins and the loser complains. The ''Ultimate Submission'' match is a variant of the Iron Man match where only submissions count for points.



** The more common variation (this match is very rare) is the heel wrestler taking a big lead, then the face wrestler racing to either tie the score or force overtime. In the most famous Iron Man match to actually feature pinfalls, [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] was racing to tie the score against [[Wrestling/TripleH HHH]]; as he was WWF Champion at the time, he would retain his title in the event of a draw (a convention which has been retained since).

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** The more common variation (this match is very rare) is the heel wrestler taking a big lead, then the face wrestler racing to either tie the score or force overtime. In the most famous Iron Man match to actually feature pinfalls, [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] was racing to tie the score against [[Wrestling/TripleH HHH]]; Wrestling/TripleH; as he was WWF Champion at the time, he would retain his title in the event of a draw (a convention which has been retained since).



** TNA, somewhat predictably, came up with a ludicrous variant where the participants have to fight into the cage.

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** TNA, somewhat predictably, came up with a ludicrous variant where the participants have to fight into ''into'' the cage.



** The infamous Hell in a Cell between Wrestling/MickFoley and Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''Wrestling/KingOfTheRing '98'' involved Foley taking two big falls: once getting thrown off the top of the 20-foot cage into the SpanishAnnouncersTable, and then (while badly injured from that first bump) getting chokeslammed ''through'' the roof of the cell. Until the WWE started toning things down for safety, attempts to replicate the HolyShitQuotient of that match were common.

to:

** The infamous Hell in a Cell between Wrestling/MickFoley and Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''Wrestling/KingOfTheRing '98'' involved Foley taking two big falls: once getting thrown off the top of the 20-foot cage into the SpanishAnnouncersTable, and then (while badly injured from that first bump) getting chokeslammed ''through'' the roof of the cell. Until the WWE started toning things down for safety, safety reasons, attempts to replicate the HolyShitQuotient of that match were common.



*** WWF did a one-time variation of this where they rented an entire arena and then...didn't sell tickets (instead broadcasting the match to a ''filled'' arena elsewhere[[note]]This was "Halftime Heat", a WWF event that was going up against the SuperBowl, so they had to play their best hand[[/note]]). This was called the ''Empty Arena'' match and was basically a Hardcore Match but without the audience, allowing [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] and [[Wrestling/MickFoley Mankind]] to brawl all through the audience area that would normally be filled with people. Mankind won the WWF Championship by pinning The Rock using a forklift and a pallet (hey, his shoulders were down) and this match was never used again (due to the prohibitive cost-usually a promotion will later sell tickets for later matches in that same arena and show the empty seats to them on a screen or something or just use an arena they own).

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*** WWF did a one-time variation of this where they rented an entire arena and then...didn't sell tickets (instead broadcasting the match to a ''filled'' arena elsewhere[[note]]This was "Halftime Heat", ''Halftime Heat'', a WWF event that was going up against the SuperBowl, UsefulNotes/SuperBowl, so they had to play their best hand[[/note]]). This was called the ''Empty Arena'' match and was basically a Hardcore Match but without the audience, allowing [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] and [[Wrestling/MickFoley Mankind]] to brawl all through the audience area that would normally be filled with people. Mankind won the WWF Championship by pinning The Rock using a forklift and a pallet (hey, his shoulders were down) and this match was never used again (due to the prohibitive cost-usually a promotion will later sell tickets for later matches in that same arena and show the empty seats to them on a screen or something or just use an arena they own).



* ''Bra & Panties Match'' -- Two female wrestlers (or more likely, two non-wrestling pieces of eye candy) get in the ring and "violence" ensues until one of them is stripped of all clothing save their underwear. Used to be an "evening gown match" or a men's equivalent "tuxedo match" until the mid 90s Attitude era and was traditionally limited to valets and managers until that same era saw full time wrestlers participate in them. Tropes: Typically the heel loses and is humiliated by it, fleeing the ring trying to cover up... and then the victorious face willingly strips down ANYWAY and parades around the ring for the (usually male) fans to enjoy.

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* ''Bra & Panties Match'' -- Two female wrestlers (or more likely, two non-wrestling pieces of eye candy) get in the ring and "violence" ensues until one of them is stripped of all clothing save their underwear. Used to be an "evening gown match" or a men's equivalent "tuxedo match" until the mid 90s Attitude era and was traditionally limited to valets and managers until that same era saw full time wrestlers participate in them. Tropes: Typically the heel loses and is humiliated by it, fleeing the ring trying to cover up... and then the victorious face willingly strips down ANYWAY anyway and parades around the ring for the (usually male) fans to enjoy.



** In WWE's version of FCW, a "Money In The Bank" variation of the pole match with multiple participants and the winner getting a title shot, was done fairly often, especially with the "divas".

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** In WWE's version of FCW, a "Money In The Bank" variation of the pole match with multiple participants and the winner getting a title shot, was done fairly often, especially with the "divas".Divas.



** In a 2011 "I Quit" match between Wrestling/JohnCena[[note]](Who has an impressive record in "I Quit" matches (i.e. undefeated), which makes sense, considering [[{{Determinator}} his gimmick.]])[[/note]] and Wrestling/TheMiz, a similar tactic was used by Miz in order to seemingly win the match, but on the account of the referee finding the cellphone that played the supposed recording of (an out-of-context) Cena saying "I quit!", Miz ended up losing the match to Cena.

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** In a 2011 "I Quit" match between Wrestling/JohnCena[[note]](Who has an impressive record in "I Quit" matches (i.e. undefeated), (undefeated, which makes sense, considering [[{{Determinator}} his gimmick.]])[[/note]] and Wrestling/TheMiz, a similar tactic was used by Miz in order to seemingly win the match, but on the account of the referee finding the cellphone that played the supposed recording of (an out-of-context) Cena saying "I quit!", Miz ended up losing the match to Cena.



** An I Quit match that made the ''loser'' seem royally BadAss was the one between Wrestling/BretHart and Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin: the match ended with Austin ''passing out'', but never saying "I Quit".

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** An I Quit match that made the ''loser'' seem royally BadAss {{Badass}} was the one between Wrestling/BretHart and Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin: the match ended with Austin ''passing out'', but never saying "I Quit".
19th Mar '16 12:43:16 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** One such match between Kaz and [[Wrestling/{{Goldust}} Black Reign]] had four boxes on poles. Three held mousetraps, the winning box held Black Reign's pet rat.

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** One such match between Kaz [[Wrestling/FrankieKazarian Kaz]] and [[Wrestling/{{Goldust}} Black Reign]] had four boxes on poles. Three held mousetraps, the winning box held Black Reign's pet rat.



** The ''Pole and Paddle'' variation was one that Wrestling/TrishStratus did rather often. The match consisted of two attractive females, and the object in question was a spanking paddle; once one wrestler won the match by gaining it, she could spank the user. Usually done solely for fanservice, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3Ydn6DoMDA with one very notorious exception]] involving a rather irate Wrestling/MollyHolly.

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** The ''Pole and Paddle'' variation was one that Wrestling/TrishStratus did rather often. The match consisted of two attractive females, and the object in question was a spanking paddle; once one wrestler won the match by gaining it, she could spank the user.loser. Usually done solely for fanservice, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3Ydn6DoMDA with one very notorious exception]] involving a rather irate Wrestling/MollyHolly.
18th Mar '16 8:38:36 AM 313Bluestreak
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*** Notably averted by the Wrestling/ShawnMichaels[=/=]Wrestling/TripleH[=/=]Wrestling/ChrisBenoit match at WrestleMania XX, and the rematch at Backlash. No FaceHeelTurn from either Michaels or Benoit, and Wrestling/TripleH didn't win - [[CanonDiscontinuity Benoit]] [[ToBeAMaster did]]. Both times. The first by making Wrestling/TripleH tap out, and the second by making Shawn Michaels tap out.

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*** Notably averted by the Wrestling/ShawnMichaels[=/=]Wrestling/TripleH[=/=]Wrestling/ChrisBenoit match at WrestleMania XX, and the rematch at Backlash.Wrestling/{{Backlash}}. No FaceHeelTurn from either Michaels or Benoit, and Wrestling/TripleH didn't win - [[CanonDiscontinuity Benoit]] [[ToBeAMaster did]]. Both times. The first by making Wrestling/TripleH tap out, and the second by making Shawn Michaels tap out.
28th Feb '16 4:14:50 PM bryancrain88
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** ''Wrestling/RoyalRumble'' -- WWE's signature variation of the Battle Royal has 30 men[[note]](20 in 1988, expanded to 40 in 2011 but back to 30 in 2012)[[/note]] with a twist: It starts with two wrestlers in the ring, and a new wrestler is added every 2 minutes, Although it has had 1, 1 1/2 and 2 minute intervals, the actual timing of the entrances varies on how "into" the match the crowd are. An entire pay-per-view event is built around it, and since 1993 the winner gets a shot at one of the two top titles at Wrestling/WrestleMania, which is held approximately two months afterwards. Tropes: Expect one of the first two wrestlers to last to the final four. If there's anybody that the evil boss has spent the last month trying to keep out of the match, watch him; he'll be the one to win it all. At one point, a dominant heel will go on an elimination spree but not actually win the match. Also, the last wrestler to enter ''rarely'' wins, despite the obvious theoretical advantage to entering last. Only Wrestling/JohnCena and Wrestling/TheUndertaker have done so, and it can be said Cena's win was more because of the element of surprise -- this was Cena's return from an injury.

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** ''Wrestling/RoyalRumble'' -- WWE's signature variation of the Battle Royal has 30 men[[note]](20 in 1988, expanded to 40 in 2011 but back to 30 in 2012)[[/note]] with a twist: It starts with two wrestlers in the ring, and a new wrestler is added every 2 minutes, Although it has had 1, 1 1/2 and 2 minute intervals, the actual timing of the entrances varies on how "into" the match the crowd are. An entire pay-per-view event is built around it, and since 1993 the winner gets a shot at one of the two top titles at Wrestling/WrestleMania, which is held approximately two months afterwards. Tropes: Expect one of the first two wrestlers to last to the final four. If there's anybody that the evil boss has spent the last month trying to keep out of the match, watch him; he'll be the one to win it all. At one point, a dominant heel will go on an elimination spree but not actually win the match. Also, the last wrestler to enter ''rarely'' wins, despite the obvious theoretical advantage to entering last. Only Wrestling/JohnCena Wrestling/JohnCena, Wrestling/TheUndertaker, and Wrestling/TheUndertaker Wrestling/TripleH have done so, and it can be said Cena's win was more because of the element of surprise -- this was Cena's return from an injury.
14th Feb '16 7:12:24 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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* ''Steel Cage Match'' -- The ring is surrounded by a chainlink fence cage; you must win by pinfall, submission, or escaping the cage (either by exiting through the door, or climbing over the top[[note]]{Sometimes the door is padlocked after the wrestlers enter, so that climbing out is the ''only'' way to escape. Well, unless something ridiculous happens like a wrestler getting bodyslammed through the floor of the ring and escaping ''under'' the cage. Yes, WWE has actually ended a cage match in that manner.}[[/note]]; this stipulation was popularised by the WWF). In traditional Wrestling/{{WWE}} cage matches the ONLY win method is escape, but modern matches usually ignore this as the drama of someone slowly climbing up gets old after awhile. Tropes: Good or bad, nobody tries for the pin, submission, or outside the door victories until they get desperate; everybody tries to climb over the top first. A wrestler perched on the top will often give up his impending victory and instead jump back into the cage with a splash, elbow drop, or other move.

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* ''Steel Cage Match'' -- The ring is surrounded by a chainlink fence cage; you must win by pinfall, submission, or escaping the cage (either by exiting through the door, or climbing over the top[[note]]{Sometimes the door is padlocked after the wrestlers enter, so that climbing out is the ''only'' way to escape. Well, unless something ridiculous happens like a wrestler getting bodyslammed through the floor of the ring and escaping ''under'' the cage. Yes, WWE has actually ended a cage match in that manner.}[[/note]]; this stipulation was popularised by the WWF). In traditional Wrestling/{{WWE}} cage matches the ONLY win method is escape, but modern post territorial era matches usually ignore this as the drama of someone slowly climbing up gets old after awhile. Tropes: Good or bad, nobody tries for the pin, submission, or outside the door victories until they get desperate; everybody tries to climb over the top first. A wrestler perched on the top will often give up his impending victory and instead jump back into the cage with a splash, elbow drop, or other move.



* ''War Games: The Match Beyond'' -- a signature match of defunct promotion WCW; the War Games match started with two rings, side-by-side, surrounded with a steel cage, and two teams of four (originally five, including the managers of the Road Warriors and the Four Horsemen in the original NWA War Games) wrestlers each. One wrestler from each team starts the match. After five minutes, one team (determined by coin toss) gets to send another man in, making it two-on-one. Two minutes later, the other side gets to send a man in. The two teams alternate sending men into the cage, every two minutes, until all eight men are in. At this point, "the match beyond" officially begins. Up until this point, there is no way to end the match; after this, the first team to make one of their opponents submit is declared the winner. TNA has run a variation of this match with only one ring, calling it ''Lethal Lockdown''. Tropes: The {{heel}}s ''always'' win the coin toss, making sure that the {{face}}s are a man down (and thus, the underdogs) going through the majority of the match. This also increases the drama when the faces are able to even the odds after every advantage period.

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* ''War Games: The Match Beyond'' -- a signature match of defunct promotion WCW; the War Games match started with two rings, side-by-side, surrounded with a steel cage, and two teams of four (originally five, including the managers of the [[Wrestling/LegionOfDoom Road Warriors Warriors]] and the Four Horsemen Wrestling/TheFourHorsemen in the original NWA War Games) wrestlers each. One wrestler from each team starts the match. After five minutes, one team (determined by coin toss) gets to send another man in, making it two-on-one. Two minutes later, the other side gets to send a man in. The two teams alternate sending men into the cage, every two minutes, until all eight men are in. At this point, "the match beyond" officially begins. Up until this point, there is no way to end the match; after this, the first team to make one of their opponents submit is declared the winner. TNA has run a variation of this match with only one ring, calling it ''Lethal Lockdown''. Tropes: The {{heel}}s ''always'' win the coin toss, making sure that the {{face}}s are a man down (and thus, the underdogs) going through the majority of the match. This also increases the drama when the faces are able to even the odds after every advantage period.



* ''Battle Royal'' -- A match with a large number of participants (usually 20, but see Royal Rumble below) begin in the ring. The winner is the last man standing. Elimination is being thrown from the ring and landing on the floor outside (usually over the top rope, though Diva battle royals sometimes only requiring having exited the ring). Tropes: The biggest wrestler almost never wins, but it usually takes three or four (or sometimes ten or more) guys to eliminate him.[[note]] This trope was averted when this gimmick match was born in the 1970s; Andre the Giant specialized in winning them.[[/note]] Also expect at least one elimination by someone who's already been eliminated (or occasionally by somebody who's not an actual participant). There will also often be one wrestler who's universally hated by faces and heels alike, who everybody teams up to eliminate immediately.

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* ''Battle Royal'' -- A match with a large number of participants (usually 20, but see Royal Rumble below) begin in the ring. The winner is the last man standing. Elimination is being thrown from the ring and landing on the floor outside (usually over the top rope, though Diva battle royals sometimes only requiring having exited the ring). Tropes: The biggest wrestler almost never wins, but it usually takes three or four (or sometimes ten or more) guys to eliminate him.[[note]] This trope was averted when this gimmick match was born in the 1970s; Andre the Giant Wrestling/AndreTheGiant specialized in winning them.[[/note]] Also expect at least one elimination by someone who's already been eliminated (or occasionally by somebody who's not an actual participant). There will also often be one wrestler who's universally hated by faces and heels alike, who everybody teams up to eliminate immediately.



* ''[[NoHoldsBarredContest No Disqualification/No Holds Barred/Street Fight/Extreme Rules]]'' -- These match types in the modern era connote an "anything goes" scenario where the only way to win is through pinfall or submission, with subtle variations depending on the elements each match type emphasizes. Falls counting anywhere is optional, but not standard like in the eponymous match type or a normal hardcore match. No DQ and No Holds Barred matches originally (and often still do) functioned like regular matches, with the former just disregarding the DQ rule and the latter allowing "banned" moves. Street fights sometimes have participants compete in "street clothes" rather than wrestling gear, and weapons are improvised from the surroundings or brought by the participants themselves.

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* ''[[NoHoldsBarredContest No Disqualification/No Holds Barred/Street Fight/Extreme Rules]]'' -- These match types in the modern post territory era connote an "anything goes" scenario where the only way to win is through pinfall or submission, with subtle variations depending on the elements each match type emphasizes. Falls counting anywhere is optional, but not standard like in the eponymous match type or a normal hardcore match. No DQ and No Holds Barred matches originally (and often still do) functioned like regular matches, with the former just disregarding the DQ rule and the latter allowing "banned" moves. Street fights sometimes have participants compete in "street clothes" rather than wrestling gear, and weapons are improvised from the surroundings or brought by the participants themselves.
16th Jan '16 10:37:10 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** "Two out of three falls" was actually the standard in the very early years of professional wrestling, with "One-fall" becoming the norm when wrestling made the jump from "sport" to "sports entertainment".

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** "Two out of three falls" was actually the standard in the very early years of professional wrestling, with "One-fall" becoming the norm when wrestling made the jump from "sport" to "sports entertainment". Before this a single fall contest was called a "Lightning Match".
16th Jan '16 10:00:56 PM Gimere
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Wrestling/{{TNA}} [[InsistentTerminology prefers to refer to their gimmick matches as "concept matches"]].

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Wrestling/{{TNA}} [[InsistentTerminology prefers to refer to call their gimmick matches as "concept matches"]].



* ''2-out-of-3-falls'' -- The simplest of gimmick matches, this simply means that the wrestlers have a series of matches until one of them has won 2. Sometimes each fall will have its own gimmick from another match type on the list; this is called a ''Three Stages of Hell'' match. Tropes: This match is almost '''never''' decided after two falls; the competitors win one apiece, leading to the third, deciding fall. Usually, if the match ends in two straight falls, then someone is either working a "losing streak" angle or is being buried.The Briscoe Brothers in Wrestling/RingOfHonor developed a reputation for winning these matches in two straight falls.

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* ''2-out-of-3-falls'' -- The simplest of gimmick matches, this simply means that the wrestlers have a series of matches until one of them has won 2. Sometimes each fall will have its own gimmick from another match type on the list; this is called a ''Three Stages of Hell'' match. Tropes: This match is almost '''never''' decided after two falls; the competitors win one apiece, leading to the third, deciding fall. Usually, if the match ends in two straight falls, then someone is either working a "losing streak" angle or is being buried. The Briscoe Brothers in Wrestling/RingOfHonor developed a reputation for winning these matches in two straight falls.



* ''Steel Cage Match'' -- The ring is surrounded by a chainlink fence cage; you must win by pinfall, submission, or escaping the cage (either by exiting through the door, or climbing over the top[[note]]{Sometimes the door is padlocked after the wrestlers enter, so that climbing out is the ''only'' way to escape. Well, unless something ridiculous happens like a wrestler getting bodyslammed through the floor of the ring and escaping ''under'' the cage. Yes, the WWE has actually ended a cage match in that manner.}[[/note]]; this stipulation was popularised by the WWF). In traditional Wrestling/{{WWE}} cage matches the ONLY win method is escape, but modern matches usually ignore this as the drama of someone slowly climbing up gets old after awhile. Tropes: Good or bad, nobody tries for the pin, submission, or outside the door victories until they get desperate; everybody tries to climb over the top first. A wrestler perched on the top will often give up his impending victory and instead jump back into the cage with a splash, elbow drop, or other move.

to:

* ''Steel Cage Match'' -- The ring is surrounded by a chainlink fence cage; you must win by pinfall, submission, or escaping the cage (either by exiting through the door, or climbing over the top[[note]]{Sometimes the door is padlocked after the wrestlers enter, so that climbing out is the ''only'' way to escape. Well, unless something ridiculous happens like a wrestler getting bodyslammed through the floor of the ring and escaping ''under'' the cage. Yes, the WWE has actually ended a cage match in that manner.}[[/note]]; this stipulation was popularised by the WWF). In traditional Wrestling/{{WWE}} cage matches the ONLY win method is escape, but modern matches usually ignore this as the drama of someone slowly climbing up gets old after awhile. Tropes: Good or bad, nobody tries for the pin, submission, or outside the door victories until they get desperate; everybody tries to climb over the top first. A wrestler perched on the top will often give up his impending victory and instead jump back into the cage with a splash, elbow drop, or other move.



** John Cena and Randy Orton once took on the '''entire''' Wrestling/{{WWERAW}} roster. It was also an Elimination Match.

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** John Cena and Randy Orton once took on the '''entire''' Wrestling/{{WWERAW}} [[Wrestling/{{WWERAW}} Raw]] roster. It was also an Elimination Match.
29th Dec '15 4:18:18 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions(such as Super World Of Sports, Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.

to:

** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions(such as Super World Of Sports, X-LAW, Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
This list shows the last 10 events of 172. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GimmickMatches