History Main / GimmickMatches

16th Jan '16 10:37:10 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** "Two out of three falls" was actually the standard in the very early years of professional wrestling, with "One-fall" becoming the norm when wrestling made the jump from "sport" to "sports entertainment".
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** "Two out of three falls" was actually the standard in the very early years of professional wrestling, with "One-fall" becoming the norm when wrestling made the jump from "sport" to "sports entertainment". Before this a single fall contest was called a "Lightning Match".
16th Jan '16 10:00:56 PM Gimere
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Wrestling/{{TNA}} [[InsistentTerminology prefers to refer to their gimmick matches as "concept matches"]].
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Wrestling/{{TNA}} [[InsistentTerminology prefers to refer to call their gimmick matches as "concept matches"]].

* ''2-out-of-3-falls'' -- The simplest of gimmick matches, this simply means that the wrestlers have a series of matches until one of them has won 2. Sometimes each fall will have its own gimmick from another match type on the list; this is called a ''Three Stages of Hell'' match. Tropes: This match is almost '''never''' decided after two falls; the competitors win one apiece, leading to the third, deciding fall. Usually, if the match ends in two straight falls, then someone is either working a "losing streak" angle or is being buried.The Briscoe Brothers in Wrestling/RingOfHonor developed a reputation for winning these matches in two straight falls.
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* ''2-out-of-3-falls'' -- The simplest of gimmick matches, this simply means that the wrestlers have a series of matches until one of them has won 2. Sometimes each fall will have its own gimmick from another match type on the list; this is called a ''Three Stages of Hell'' match. Tropes: This match is almost '''never''' decided after two falls; the competitors win one apiece, leading to the third, deciding fall. Usually, if the match ends in two straight falls, then someone is either working a "losing streak" angle or is being buried. The Briscoe Brothers in Wrestling/RingOfHonor developed a reputation for winning these matches in two straight falls.

* ''Steel Cage Match'' -- The ring is surrounded by a chainlink fence cage; you must win by pinfall, submission, or escaping the cage (either by exiting through the door, or climbing over the top[[note]]{Sometimes the door is padlocked after the wrestlers enter, so that climbing out is the ''only'' way to escape. Well, unless something ridiculous happens like a wrestler getting bodyslammed through the floor of the ring and escaping ''under'' the cage. Yes, the WWE has actually ended a cage match in that manner.}[[/note]]; this stipulation was popularised by the WWF). In traditional Wrestling/{{WWE}} cage matches the ONLY win method is escape, but modern matches usually ignore this as the drama of someone slowly climbing up gets old after awhile. Tropes: Good or bad, nobody tries for the pin, submission, or outside the door victories until they get desperate; everybody tries to climb over the top first. A wrestler perched on the top will often give up his impending victory and instead jump back into the cage with a splash, elbow drop, or other move.
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* ''Steel Cage Match'' -- The ring is surrounded by a chainlink fence cage; you must win by pinfall, submission, or escaping the cage (either by exiting through the door, or climbing over the top[[note]]{Sometimes the door is padlocked after the wrestlers enter, so that climbing out is the ''only'' way to escape. Well, unless something ridiculous happens like a wrestler getting bodyslammed through the floor of the ring and escaping ''under'' the cage. Yes, the WWE has actually ended a cage match in that manner.}[[/note]]; this stipulation was popularised by the WWF). In traditional Wrestling/{{WWE}} cage matches the ONLY win method is escape, but modern matches usually ignore this as the drama of someone slowly climbing up gets old after awhile. Tropes: Good or bad, nobody tries for the pin, submission, or outside the door victories until they get desperate; everybody tries to climb over the top first. A wrestler perched on the top will often give up his impending victory and instead jump back into the cage with a splash, elbow drop, or other move.

** John Cena and Randy Orton once took on the '''entire''' Wrestling/{{WWERAW}} roster. It was also an Elimination Match.
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** John Cena and Randy Orton once took on the '''entire''' Wrestling/{{WWERAW}} [[Wrestling/{{WWERAW}} Raw]] roster. It was also an Elimination Match.
29th Dec '15 4:18:18 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions(such as Super World Of Sports, Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
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** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions(such as Super World Of Sports, X-LAW, Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
24th Dec '15 11:09:05 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions(such as Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
to:
** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions(such as Super World Of Sports, Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
5th Dec '15 4:16:14 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** ''Falls Count Anywhere'' -- ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Often more of a street fight than the eponymous match type itself (some feds such as ECW and LLF have managed to halt traffic with these matches), as it's not uncommon for the action to spill onto to the backstage areas or even outside the arenas and onto the actual streets. Depending on the circumstances it can be as tame as the above or extreme as below in terms of violence.
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** ''Falls Count Anywhere'' -- ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Often more of a street fight than the eponymous match type itself (some feds such as ECW and LLF have managed to halt traffic with these matches), itself, as it's not uncommon for the action to spill onto to the backstage areas or even outside the arenas and onto the actual streets.streets(some feds such as ECW and LLF have managed to halt traffic with these matches). Depending on the circumstances it can be as tame as the above or extreme as below in terms of violence.

** ''Falls Count Anywhere'' * ''Bath House Death Match'' -- ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Often Believed to have been started by IWA Japan in 1995, The wrestlers compete in the pool of a [[PublicBathhouseScene public bathhouse]]. Besides regular wrestling rules, if they leave the pool, they are disqualified. The pool is heated by a fire that is regularly fed more of a street fight than the eponymous match type itself (some feds such as ECW logs, making staying in it harder and LLF have managed to halt traffic with these matches), as it's not uncommon for the action to spill onto to the backstage areas or even outside the arenas and onto the actual streets. Depending on the circumstances it can be as tame as the above or extreme as below in terms of violence.harder.

* ''Bath House Death Match'' -- Believed to have been started by IWA Japan in 1995, The wrestlers compete in the pool of a [[PublicBathhouseScene public bathhouse]]. Besides regular wrestling rules, if they leave the pool, they are disqualified. The pool is heated by a fire that is regularly fed more logs, making staying in it harder and harder. * ''Piranha Death Match'' -- Another BJPW gift, a tank of piranhas is placed in the middle of the ring and the opponent's head must be held in it for ten seconds for the match to end. Barbed wire boards are included to bloody up the opponent so the fish will be more likely to bite. Variations in include a ''Scorpion Death Match'' which is the same thing with scorpions and instead of barbed wire, cactus plants are used [[AllDesertsHaveCacti for a more desert feel.]]
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* ''Bath House Death Match'' -- Believed to have been started by IWA Japan in 1995, The wrestlers compete in the pool of a [[PublicBathhouseScene public bathhouse]]. Besides regular wrestling rules, if they leave the pool, they are disqualified. The pool is heated by a fire that is regularly fed more logs, making staying in it harder and harder. * ''Piranha Death Match'' -- Another BJPW Big Japan Pro Wrestling gift, a tank of piranhas is placed in the middle of the ring and the opponent's head must be held in it for ten seconds for the match to end. Barbed wire boards are included to bloody up the opponent so the fish will be more likely to bite. Variations in include a ''Scorpion Death Match'' which is the same thing with scorpions and instead of barbed wire, cactus plants are used [[AllDesertsHaveCacti for a more desert feel.]]
5th Dec '15 3:31:43 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** In February 2015, Wonder Ring STARDOM decreed an immediate match ending disqualification must be called on any closed fist strike in response to Yoshiko going into business for herself on the Sunday 22nd Korakuen Hall show against Act Yasukawa. This was later clarified to be limited to face punches, which meant things like Io Shirai delivering a slingshot superman punch to the back of Hudson Envy's head were did not stop matches.
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** In February 2015, Wonder Ring STARDOM decreed an immediate match ending disqualification must be called on any closed fist strike in response to Yoshiko going into business for herself on the Sunday 22nd Korakuen Hall show against Act Yasukawa. This was later clarified to be limited to face punches, which meant things like Io Shirai delivering a slingshot superman punch to the back of Hudson Envy's head were did not stop matches.
5th Dec '15 2:49:21 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** A variation is the ''Bunkhouse Brawl'', where weapons are strewn around the ring. Usually things like 2x4s, loaded gloves, or baseball bats. Former wrestler Wrestling/{{Raven}} made this match his specialty during his time in Ring of Honor and TNA; his personal version was called the ''[[Literature/AClockworkOrange Clockwork Orange]] [[MaximumFunChamber House of Fun]] Match''.
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** A variation is the ''Bunkhouse Brawl'', where weapons are strewn around the ring. Usually things like 2x4s, loaded gloves, or baseball bats. Former wrestler Wrestling/{{Raven}} made this match his specialty during his time in Ring of Honor and TNA; his personal version was called the ''[[Literature/AClockworkOrange Clockwork Orange]] [[MaximumFunChamber House of Fun]] Match''.
5th Dec '15 2:49:02 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** A variation is the ''Bunkhouse Brawl'', where weapons are strewn around the ring. Usually things like 2x4s, loaded gloves, or baseball bats. Former wrestler Raven made this match his specialty during his time in Ring of Honor and TNA; his personal version was called the ''[[Literature/AClockworkOrange Clockwork Orange]] [[MaximumFunChamber House of Fun]] Match''.
to:
** A variation is the ''Bunkhouse Brawl'', where weapons are strewn around the ring. Usually things like 2x4s, loaded gloves, or baseball bats. Former wrestler Raven Wrestling/{{Raven}} made this match his specialty during his time in Ring of Honor and TNA; his personal version was called the ''[[Literature/AClockworkOrange Clockwork Orange]] [[MaximumFunChamber House of Fun]] Match''.
5th Dec '15 12:41:19 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions. Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
to:
** Easily the most common of all gimmick matches, tag teams are hardly even considered a gimmick any more, and for a while it was common for promotions to establish tag team titles before any other kinds of belts or divisions.divisions(such as Wrestling/{{Chikara}} and WAVE). Mexican fans couldn't get enough of tag teams, to the point that UWA introduced a ''[[PowerTrio trios division]]'', while Wrestling/{{AAA}} came up with a mascot division where a smaller wrestler teams up with a larger wrestler using a derivative of his gimmick (or the other way around), and a mixed tag team division where a man must team with a woman.
25th Nov '15 10:05:26 AM 313Bluestreak
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** WWE has the ''Money in the Bank'' Match, originally at WrestleMania, but now with [[Wrestling/MoneyInTheBank its own PPV]]; anywhere from six to ten wrestlers compete at once, and the prize being hung above the ring is a briefcase, inside which is a contract which the winner can use to get a world championship match anytime he wants within one calendar year of winning it. Almost every time the contract has been cashed in, the one doing the cashing won the title, usually by doing so right after the current champion has taken a nasty beating from a previous challenger and is in little to no condition to fight back. There were only two exceptions to the battered champion strategy. The first was Wrestling/RobVanDam's cashing against then-WWE Champion Wrestling/JohnCena at ECW One Night Stand, which RVD announced weeks beforehand and simply gave him "homefield" advantage. The other was on the 1000th episode of Raw where Cena did the same to Wrestling/CMPunk. Only twice has the briefcase holder lost the cash-in match; first with the aforementioned Cena match and the second time with Wrestling/DamienSandow. Most winners of the Money in the Bank match have been heels: only RVD, CM Punk (twice), Wrestling/{{Kane}}, Daniel Bryan, Cena, and Wrestling/RandyOrton have won the match as faces, and in the cases of Punk the second time, Kane, Bryan, and Orton, turned heel very shortly (or in Orton's case, immediately) after winning the title.
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** WWE has the ''Money in the Bank'' Match, originally at WrestleMania, Wrestling/WrestleMania, but now with [[Wrestling/MoneyInTheBank its own PPV]]; anywhere from six to ten wrestlers compete at once, and the prize being hung above the ring is a briefcase, inside which is a contract which the winner can use to get a world championship match anytime he wants within one calendar year of winning it. Almost every time the contract has been cashed in, the one doing the cashing won the title, usually by doing so right after the current champion has taken a nasty beating from a previous challenger and is in little to no condition to fight back. There were only two exceptions to the battered champion strategy. The first was Wrestling/RobVanDam's cashing against then-WWE Champion Wrestling/JohnCena at ECW One Night Stand, which RVD announced weeks beforehand and simply gave him "homefield" advantage. The other was on the 1000th episode of Raw where Cena did the same to Wrestling/CMPunk. Only twice has the briefcase holder lost the cash-in match; first with the aforementioned Cena match and the second time with Wrestling/DamienSandow. Most winners of the Money in the Bank match have been heels: only RVD, CM Punk (twice), Wrestling/{{Kane}}, Daniel Bryan, Cena, and Wrestling/RandyOrton have won the match as faces, and in the cases of Punk the second time, Kane, Bryan, and Orton, turned heel very shortly (or in Orton's case, immediately) after winning the title.

** The infamous Hell in a Cell between Wrestling/MickFoley and Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''King of the Ring '98'' involved Foley taking two big falls: once getting thrown off the top of the 20-foot cage into the SpanishAnnouncersTable, and then (while badly injured from that first bump) getting chokeslammed ''through'' the roof of the cell. Until the WWE started toning things down for safety, attempts to replicate the HolyShitQuotient of that match were common.
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** The infamous Hell in a Cell between Wrestling/MickFoley and Wrestling/TheUndertaker at ''King of the Ring ''Wrestling/KingOfTheRing '98'' involved Foley taking two big falls: once getting thrown off the top of the 20-foot cage into the SpanishAnnouncersTable, and then (while badly injured from that first bump) getting chokeslammed ''through'' the roof of the cell. Until the WWE started toning things down for safety, attempts to replicate the HolyShitQuotient of that match were common.
This list shows the last 10 events of 165. Show all.