History Main / GentlemanAndAScholar

11th Aug '17 9:33:23 AM TudorRose
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Professor Lambert of the ''Website/{{Neopets}}'' ''War of the Obelisk'' is extremely intelligent and seems to be a genuinely nice person as well.

to:

* Professor Lambert of the ''Website/{{Neopets}}'' ''War of the Obelisk'' is extremely intelligent and seems to be a genuinely nice and polite person as well.
11th Aug '17 9:32:40 AM TudorRose
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Professor Lambert of the ''Website/{{Neopets}}'' ''War of the Obelisk'' is extremely intelligent and seems to be a genuinely nice person as well.
15th Jul '17 8:37:21 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->-- ''The [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Gentleman]] unit upon being stationed in a research building, [[{{VideoGame/EmpireTotalWar}} Empire]] and [[{{VideoGame/Napoleon Total War}} Napoleon: Total War]]''.

to:

-->-- ''The [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Gentleman]] unit upon being stationed in a research building, [[{{VideoGame/EmpireTotalWar}} Empire]] {{VideoGame/Empire|TotalWar}} and [[{{VideoGame/Napoleon Total War}} Napoleon: Total War]]''.
VideoGame/NapoleonTotalWar''.



** The same can be said about Creator/BenedictCumberbatch. As ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' co-star [[http://bakerstreetbabes.tumblr.com/post/22846797732/listen-transcript-in-sherlock-she Lara Pulver]] put it, "Never play a word association game with BenedictCumberbatch. The man is a living Oxford Dictionary."

to:

** The same can be said about Creator/BenedictCumberbatch. As ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' co-star [[http://bakerstreetbabes.tumblr.com/post/22846797732/listen-transcript-in-sherlock-she Lara Pulver]] put it, "Never play a word association game with BenedictCumberbatch.Benedict Cumberbatch. The man is a living Oxford Dictionary."
7th Jun '17 6:57:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Phase, of the WhateleyUniverse. Once an heir to the largest fortune on the planet, he now copes with his mutation with aplomb, and a ruthless determination to fix himself. He speaks four modern languages, reads Latin and classical Greek and Old English, is currently working on several journal articles with a professor of world literature, and is single-handedly attacking the ReedRichardsIsUseless trope across [[SuperheroSchool Whateley Academy]].

to:

* Phase, of the WhateleyUniverse.Literature/WhateleyUniverse. Once an heir to the largest fortune on the planet, he now copes with his mutation with aplomb, and a ruthless determination to fix himself. He speaks four modern languages, reads Latin and classical Greek and Old English, is currently working on several journal articles with a professor of world literature, and is single-handedly attacking the ReedRichardsIsUseless trope across [[SuperheroSchool Whateley Academy]].
27th May '17 7:20:47 PM annette12
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Bernadette in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' is a doctor in microbiology and [[BewareTheNiceOnes generally]] very nice and sympathetic.

to:

* Bernadette in ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' is a doctor in microbiology and [[BewareTheNiceOnes generally]] very nice and sympathetic.sympathetic in early seasons. As the show went on, her HairTriggerTemper becomes one of her most frequent traits.
4th May '17 9:55:41 AM LentilSandEater
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Remus Lupin in ''Literature/HarryPotter'' is a good example of the trope: a mild-mannered, pleasant, scholarly figure who genuinely cares about the children under his care and is generally well-liked. The only area he doesn't fit is in terms of presentation (he's always described as very shabby, with patched robes and a dilapidated suitcase), but this is a symptom of his extreme poverty, the cause of which is beyond his own control. He's also ''a frickin' werewolf'', which makes his fitting this trope all the more remarkable. A lot of werewolves turn their back on wizard society, but he is a loyal member of the good guys and a genuinely good man.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
**
Remus Lupin in ''Literature/HarryPotter'' is a good example of the trope: a mild-mannered, pleasant, scholarly figure who genuinely cares about the children under his care and is generally well-liked. The only area he doesn't fit is in terms of presentation (he's always described as very shabby, with patched robes and a dilapidated suitcase), but this is a symptom of his extreme poverty, the cause of which is beyond his own control. He's also ''a frickin' werewolf'', which makes his fitting this trope all the more remarkable. A lot of werewolves turn their back on wizard society, but he is a loyal member of the good guys and a genuinely good man.
4th May '17 9:54:42 AM LentilSandEater
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/CSLewis'

to:

* Creator/CSLewis'Creator/CSLewis



* Creator/RoaldDahl's

to:

* Creator/RoaldDahl's Creator/RoaldDahl
4th May '17 9:54:26 AM LentilSandEater
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Professor Digory Kirke in Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' novels fits like a glove. He slightly resembles an AbsentMindedProfessor at first glance, but this is probably just a thin layer of ObfuscatingStupidity. In any case, he is gracious enough to allow [[SacredHospitality the Pevensie children to stay in his home]], and dispenses sensible, mature advice based on keen and sound observations about human nature. It helps that he's [[spoiler: already been to Narnia himself]].
** Elwin Ransom in the same author's ''Literature/SpaceTrilogy''. The character was very loosely based on his friend Creator/JRRTolkien, who was a [[RealLife real-life]] example of this trope. Ransom (like Tolkien) is a philologist, a professor at Cambridge, and a linguist ''par excellence''. As for the "Gentleman" part ... it wouldn't be out of line to say Ransom is a saint in the literal sense.
* Roald Dahl's ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' is a genuinely sweet-natured kid, and never thinks of herself as superior for her brains. If she's asked anything intellectual, she will respond in a polite fashion. She really only dislikes people who are annoying or rude to her. The book carefully emphasizes this.
** Dahl's most famous character, [[Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory Willy Wonka]], also qualifies as this. He does love to boast about and show off his many wonders, and he does tend to brush off questions, but that ''generally'' stems from happiness and excitement rather than the superior manner of an InsufferableGenius. He is a whimsical {{Trickster}} (and the TropeNamer for [[TheWonka eccentric authority figures in general]]), but he's also highly intelligent and fun to be around -- provided you behave. If he had actual magical powers, rather than simply being a RenaissanceMan MadScientist, he'd fit the GentlemanWizard trope like a glove. (Note that this does not apply to his portrayal in [[Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory the 2005 film adapation]] -- there he is an InsufferableGenius ManChild instead.)

to:

* Creator/CSLewis'
**
Professor Digory Kirke in Creator/CSLewis' from ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' novels fits like a glove. He slightly resembles an AbsentMindedProfessor at first glance, but this is probably just a thin layer of ObfuscatingStupidity. In any case, he is gracious enough to allow [[SacredHospitality the Pevensie children to stay in his home]], and dispenses sensible, mature advice based on keen and sound observations about human nature. It helps that he's [[spoiler: already been to Narnia himself]].
** Elwin Ransom in the same author's from ''Literature/SpaceTrilogy''. The character was very loosely based on his friend Creator/JRRTolkien, who was a [[RealLife real-life]] example of this trope. Ransom (like Tolkien) is a philologist, a professor at Cambridge, and a linguist ''par excellence''. As for the "Gentleman" part ... it wouldn't be out of line to say Ransom is a saint in the literal sense.
* Roald Dahl's Creator/RoaldDahl's
**
''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' is a genuinely sweet-natured kid, and never thinks of herself as superior for her brains. If she's asked anything intellectual, she will respond in a polite fashion. She really only dislikes people who are annoying or rude to her. The book carefully emphasizes this.
** Dahl's most famous character, [[Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory Willy Wonka]], also qualifies as this. He does love to boast about and show off his many wonders, and he does tend to brush off questions, but that ''generally'' stems from happiness and excitement rather than the superior manner of an InsufferableGenius. He is a whimsical {{Trickster}} (and the TropeNamer for [[TheWonka eccentric authority figures in general]]), but he's also highly intelligent and fun to be around -- provided you behave. If he had actual magical powers, rather than simply being a RenaissanceMan MadScientist, he'd fit the GentlemanWizard trope like a glove. (Note that this does not apply to his portrayal in [[Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory the 2005 film adapation]] -- there he is an InsufferableGenius ManChild instead.)



* Scheherazade in the ''Literature/ArabianNights'' is a Lady and A Scholar as well as being TheStoryteller.
** As are many of the women in the stories she tells.

to:

* Scheherazade in the ''Literature/ArabianNights'' is a Lady and A Scholar as well as being TheStoryteller.
**
TheStoryteller. As are many of the women in the stories she tells.



* Literature/SherlockHolmes is quite [[GeniusSlob eccentric]], [[IntelligenceEqualsIsolation asocial]] and [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], but he is perfectly capable of behaving like a gentleman when the situation calls for it (particularly when aiding young ladies in distress). Many adaptations, however, ignore this.
** In addition, his ArchEnemy, Professor James Moriarty. Despite being ''the'' ruthless [[DiabolicalMastermind Mastermind]] of the criminal underworld, Moriarty is a renowned scholar of mathematics, and those who encounter him find him to be [[VillainWithGoodPublicity charming and fatherly]]. He is even [[AffablyEvil gentlemanly enough]] to personally offer Sherlock a chance to back down and allow Sherlock to write a letter to Watson before the final fight over Reichenbach Falls.

to:

* Literature/SherlockHolmes is quite [[GeniusSlob eccentric]], [[IntelligenceEqualsIsolation asocial]] and [[InsufferableGenius arrogant]], but he is perfectly capable of behaving like a gentleman when the situation calls for it (particularly when aiding young ladies in distress). Many adaptations, however, ignore this.
**
this. In addition, his ArchEnemy, Professor James Moriarty. Despite being ''the'' ruthless [[DiabolicalMastermind Mastermind]] of the criminal underworld, Moriarty is a renowned scholar of mathematics, and those who encounter him find him to be [[VillainWithGoodPublicity charming and fatherly]]. He is even [[AffablyEvil gentlemanly enough]] to personally offer Sherlock a chance to back down and allow Sherlock to write a letter to Watson before the final fight over Reichenbach Falls.
4th May '17 9:51:19 AM LentilSandEater
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Doc Emmett L. Brown from the ''Franchise/BackToTheFuture'' trilogy seems to be nearly a lunatic; who just happens to be a brilliant engineer. But in ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartIII'' he is revealed to be quite the gentleman, and ladies' man, as well.
** Even more impressive if you consider that he decided to become a ladies' man only relatively late, in the [[Film/BackToTheFuturePartII second movie]].
** Not to mention how different the standards of formal etiquette were between the 1980's and the 1880's.
** The original draft for both the [[Film/BackToTheFuture first film]] and the sequels have Doc as being quite the ladies man in the 1950's. It would have also been revealed that he was engaged to the daughter of the Dean of the university he worked at, before it had been broken off when he ''refused'' to help design biological and chemical weapons for the Army.

to:

* Doc Emmett L. Brown from the ''Franchise/BackToTheFuture'' trilogy seems to be nearly a lunatic; who just happens to be a brilliant engineer. But in ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartIII'' he is revealed to be quite the gentleman, and ladies' man, as well.
**
well. Even more impressive if you consider that he decided to become a ladies' man only relatively late, in the [[Film/BackToTheFuturePartII second movie]].
**
movie]]. Not to mention how different the standards of formal etiquette were between the 1980's and the 1880's.
**
1880's. The original draft for both the [[Film/BackToTheFuture first film]] and the sequels have Doc as being quite the ladies man in the 1950's. It would have also been revealed that he was engaged to the daughter of the Dean of the university he worked at, before it had been broken off when he ''refused'' to help design biological and chemical weapons for the Army.
7th Apr '17 1:13:06 PM SoRandom31
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Not so with anyone who is a '''Gentleman and a Scholar'''. He manages to be both a highly intelligent expert in his chosen field ''and'' a pleasant, well-adjusted, and socially engaging human being, sometimes being even ''more'' attuned to the nuances of social etiquette than many less-intelligent characters. Frequently, his emphasis is more on the humanities than on the natural sciences (he is probably [[CunningLinguist fluent in dead languages]] and always handy with an [[{{Epigraph}} apropos quotation]] from Creator/{{Aristotle}}, Saint Augustine, or [[Literature/TheDivineComedy Dante]]), but this is not an absolute rule. Whatever his field, he is always striving to learn more, but ''never'' allows himself to fall victim to CripplingOverspecialization. He is always well-groomed and [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel neatly dressed]], unless extraordinary circumstances dictate otherwise. Simply put, this is what happens when The Smart Guy is also a NiceGuy.

to:

Not so with anyone who is a '''Gentleman and a Scholar'''. He manages to be both a highly intelligent expert in his chosen field ''and'' a pleasant, well-adjusted, and socially engaging human being, sometimes being even ''more'' attuned to the nuances of social etiquette than many less-intelligent characters. Frequently, his emphasis is more on the humanities than on the natural sciences (he is probably [[CunningLinguist fluent in dead languages]] and always handy with an [[{{Epigraph}} apropos quotation]] from Creator/{{Aristotle}}, Saint Augustine, or [[Literature/TheDivineComedy Dante]]), but this is not an absolute rule. Whatever his field, he is always striving to learn more, but ''never'' allows himself to fall victim to CripplingOverspecialization. He is always well-groomed and [[AwesomeAnachronisticApparel neatly dressed]], unless extraordinary circumstances dictate otherwise. Simply put, this is what happens when The Smart Guy TheSmartGuy is also a NiceGuy.
This list shows the last 10 events of 287. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GentlemanAndAScholar