History Main / Gambitroulette

29th Nov '17 2:44:55 AM Oransel
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* Zemo's master plan in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' verges on a thin line between XanatosSpeedChess and this.
** Zemo’s goal is very simple: [[spoiler: obtain proof the Winter Soldier killed Tony Stark's parents by any means possible, show Tony, cause internal strife and watch the Avengers fall apart as Steve and Tony fight. This simplicity allows him to both compensate when the plan doesn't turn out perfectly (like when the HYDRA agent refuses to give him information prompting him to go alternate route via Bucky) and take advantage of existing circumstances (he had nothing to do with the Sokovia Accords and just used it for distraction).]]
** Despite this, actual implementation of the plan comes dangerously close to GambitRoulette. [[spoiler: Fortunately for Zemo, Sokovia Accords, an event that divided Avengers in two camps and greatly boosted tensions between Tony and Steve just had to happen at the time when he was going to cause that tension himself. Also, it happened right at the moment when Tony developed depression caused by combination of ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron,'' breakup with Pepper and reliving last memory of his parents as part of a science project. If either of these factors were not present, consequences of revealing the information to Tony would be ''far'' less severe and if neither happened, Tony and Steve could just talk it through. Instead, pretty much all unrelated events in the movie make his task far easier to accomplish.]]

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* Helmut Zemo's master plan in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' verges on a thin line between XanatosSpeedChess and this.
** Zemo’s His goal is very simple: [[spoiler: obtain proof the Winter Soldier killed Tony Stark's parents by any means possible, show Tony, cause internal strife and watch the Avengers fall apart as Steve and Tony fight. This simplicity allows him to both compensate when the plan doesn't turn out perfectly (like when the HYDRA agent refuses to give him information prompting him to go alternate route via Bucky) and take advantage of existing circumstances (he had nothing to do with the Sokovia Accords and just used it for distraction).]]
** Despite this, actual implementation of the plan comes dangerously close to GambitRoulette. [[spoiler: Fortunately for Zemo, Sokovia Accords, an event that divided Avengers in two camps and greatly boosted tensions between Tony and Steve just had to happen at the time when he was going to cause that tension himself. Also, it happened right at the moment when Tony developed depression caused by combination of guilt over his actions in ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron,'' breakup with Pepper and reliving last memory of his parents as part of a science project. If either of these factors were not present, consequences of revealing the information to Tony would be ''far'' less severe and if neither happened, Tony and Steve could just talk it through. Instead, pretty much all unrelated events in the movie make his Zemo's task far easier to accomplish.]]
29th Nov '17 2:21:08 AM Oransel
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** The final part of Zemo's master plan in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' relies on a lot of chance. The whole thing would have fallen apart if...
## ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and ComicBook/{{Bucky|Barnes}} had captured Zemo before Comicbook/IronMan arrived.
## Iron Man had not figured out where Cap and Bucky were headed in the first place.
## Iron Man had not come alone, meaning there might have been someone to restrain him or talk him down after he learned the truth.
## ComicBook/BlackPanther had actually succeeded in killing Bucky during one of their ''three'' fights during the course of the film.
## Captain America actually told Iron Man that his parents' death were orchestrated by HYDRA.
## Iron Man and Captain America weren't at odds already due to being on opposite sides of the law.
## The battle at the airport had had an entirely different outcome (by the fight going differently or Iron Man's side being smart enough to simply destroy every plane in the place instead of fighting, letting Captain America with no means to escape).
## Captain America hadn't gotten hold of Ant-Man, or had actually gotten someone like Thor at his side. In general, if any of the teams had the scales severely tipped in their favor.
## The government was actually secure enough to know who they let inside for interrogations or to have armed people in place next to the interrogator for Bucky.
## Iron Man hadn't acted completely irrationally at the climax.
## Captain America had gotten ahold of Bucky before the death of King T'Chaka so he never got captured.
*** What's worse is that Zemo spends the majority of the movie searching for information, the details of which are left deliberately vague to avoid spoiling the twist near the end. So, apparently all of the information for which he is searching just happens to fit exactly into the gambit that he's already started?

to:

** The final part of * Zemo's master plan in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' relies verges on a lot of chance. The whole thing would have fallen thin line between XanatosSpeedChess and this.
** Zemo’s goal is very simple: [[spoiler: obtain proof the Winter Soldier killed Tony Stark's parents by any means possible, show Tony, cause internal strife and watch the Avengers fall
apart if...
## ComicBook/CaptainAmerica
as Steve and ComicBook/{{Bucky|Barnes}} Tony fight. This simplicity allows him to both compensate when the plan doesn't turn out perfectly (like when the HYDRA agent refuses to give him information prompting him to go alternate route via Bucky) and take advantage of existing circumstances (he had captured Zemo before Comicbook/IronMan arrived.
## Iron Man had not figured out where Cap
nothing to do with the Sokovia Accords and Bucky were headed in the first place.
## Iron Man had not come alone, meaning there might have been someone to restrain him or talk him down after he learned the truth.
## ComicBook/BlackPanther had actually succeeded in killing Bucky during one of their ''three'' fights during the course
just used it for distraction).]]
** Despite this, actual implementation
of the film.
## Captain America actually told Iron Man
plan comes dangerously close to GambitRoulette. [[spoiler: Fortunately for Zemo, Sokovia Accords, an event that his parents' death were orchestrated by HYDRA.
## Iron Man
divided Avengers in two camps and Captain America weren't at odds already due greatly boosted tensions between Tony and Steve just had to being on opposite sides of the law.
## The battle
happen at the airport had had an entirely different outcome (by the fight time when he was going differently or Iron Man's side being smart enough to simply destroy every plane in the place instead of fighting, letting Captain America with no means to escape).
## Captain America hadn't gotten hold of Ant-Man, or had actually gotten someone like Thor at his side. In general, if any of the teams had the scales severely tipped in their favor.
## The government was actually secure enough to know who they let inside for interrogations or to have armed people in place next to the interrogator for Bucky.
## Iron Man hadn't acted completely irrationally
cause that tension himself. Also, it happened right at the climax.
## Captain America had gotten ahold
moment when Tony developed depression caused by combination of Bucky before the death ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron,'' breakup with Pepper and reliving last memory of King T'Chaka so he never got captured.
*** What's worse is that Zemo spends the majority
his parents as part of the movie searching for information, the details a science project. If either of which are left deliberately vague to avoid spoiling the twist near the end. So, apparently all these factors were not present, consequences of revealing the information for which he is searching to Tony would be ''far'' less severe and if neither happened, Tony and Steve could just happens to fit exactly into talk it through. Instead, pretty much all unrelated events in the gambit that he's already started?movie make his task far easier to accomplish.]]
22nd Nov '17 3:56:59 AM Ramidel
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* The Demon King in Kylie Chan's ''Literature/DarkHeavens'' trilogy has one of these running from when he first meets Emma, although since a) it's implied that he was planning One Two Two's downfall even before Emma unexpectedly showed up, and b) he didn't expect her to outsmart him the first time he tried to manipulate her, it could also be considered that he starts off playing GambitSpeedChess which develops into a Roulette.

to:

* The Demon King in Kylie Chan's ''Literature/DarkHeavens'' trilogy has one of these running from when he first meets Emma, although since a) it's implied well before the beginning of the series, encompassing most of the characters in the series. The full extent of his game is revealed around the eighth book, by which point parts of it have started to go off the rails. By contrast, the Jade Emperor does this all the time for even the littlest things, just so that he was planning One Two Two's downfall even before Emma unexpectedly showed up, can be both apparently LawfulStupid and b) he didn't expect her still an effective leader. [[spoiler: The latter doesn't ''appear'' to outsmart him be involved in defeating the first time he tried to manipulate her, it could also be considered that he starts off playing GambitSpeedChess which develops into a Roulette.former.]]



** The book ''Literature/SmallFavor'' features a subversion. Harry considers the enemy's plot to be so complex it simply should not be possible, until Murphy points out that Harry really IS that predictable, and that the villains stood to gain by doing what they are doing, whether or not Harry acted as planned.

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** The book ''Literature/SmallFavor'' features a subversion. Harry considers the enemy's plot to be so complex it simply should not be possible, until Murphy points out that Harry really IS that predictable, and that [[XanatosGambit the villains stood to gain by doing what they are doing, whether or not Harry acted as planned.planned]].
19th Nov '17 11:07:43 AM zealots
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* A lot of early detective fiction relies on {{Gambit Roulette}}s to the point where Raymond Chandler discusses it as a failing of the genre in his essay "The Simple Art of Murder".
* ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' by Creator/AgathaChristie involves a person who not only wants to kill 10 people who got away with a crime, but to do it in a certain order (from least horrible crimes to most horrible), and to make the deaths fit a [[PoeticSerialKiller nursery rhyme that he/she happened to like]]. So many things had to go right: if a certain victim had not died last or had shot rather than hung himself/herself under psychological stress, or if someone had seen the killer after his/her "death," or if the doctor had been less gullible, or if a sea storm had not sprung up, preventing any rescuer from reaching Indian Island, or if the killer's body had not rotted enough for the time of death to be uncertain, etc., that it was almost impossible for everything to work out perfectly in the end. Yet it did. With the occasional PlotHole added into it, such as the gun having only the fingerprints of the last person to touch it, despite its owner also having handled it.
** TheFilmOfTheBook does away with the silliness with the result that the killer's plan ultimately fails, and the last two intended victims survive.
** There is another TheFilmOfTheBook (USSR, 1988) which repeats the book with one exception: in the end the killer, instead of wiping away all clues, just shoots himself/herself.
** ''After the Funeral'' is much in the same vein. Miss Gilchrist's entire plot hinged on every single member of the family not recognizing their own aunt at Richard Abernethie's funeral and believing that Richard had indeed been murdered. Even when one takes into account that none of the family members had seen their aunt in a long time, it still doesn't explain why they didn't notice that Miss Gilchrist - with whom they spent several days in the same house - looked almost exactly like the 'Aunt Cora' they had recently seen at the funeral. It also stands to reason that after the real Cora's death, a family member would have to identify the body, thus exposing the deception. Miss Gilchrist's plan to poison herself so as to appear innocent could also have colossally backfired.
** The plot in ''Evil Under the Sun'' is another example. The murderer/s not only rely on synchronizing their movements according to a very precise schedule, but also arrange for the body to be "discovered" before the actual murder takes place, while the unsuspecting intended victim is hiding nearby. There are a number of ways that could have gone wrong...
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** Jake's plan to infiltrate and capture the Yeerk pool ship is a complex BatmanGambit that includes the manipulation of no less than eight separate factions, brilliantly executed by a sixteen-year-old kid of average intelligence.
** Cassie's surrender of the blue box. She lets Tom steal it from Jake, counting on the gut feeling that giving Yeerks morphing power will cause mass defection in their ranks, as a Yeerks trapped in morph will have no need to feed from the Yeerk pool and thus no longer depend on the Empire. However, she doesn't reveal this to have been her intention until after the defections start happening, making it seem like impossibly good foresight (or worse, Cassie hedging her bets, since if it ''didn't'' pan out she could always fall back on the excuse she used before of [[CainAndAbel trying to keep Jake from killing Tom]]. Not to mention her plan created a ton of risks and threats that the Animorphs didn't have to worry about before, such as an ''entire army'' of morph-capable warriors as opposed to just one. While the roulette ultimately comes up in her favor, it exacts a heavy cost in life, culminating with [[spoiler:Rachel's death.]]
** Played with in the characters of the Ellimist and Crayak, who are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens playing a CosmicChessGame with each other. Some of the results of their actions can certainly come ''across'' as this, such as in ''The Stranger'' where the Ellimist [[spoiler:counts on Rachel being quick enough on the uptake to recognize the significance of a specific elevator shaft he places her and the rest of the team in and then follow that thread to the location of the Kandrona]], but considering he [[spoiler:personally masterminded the creation of the Animorphs]], his moves aren't nearly as Roulette-y as they might look at first glance. And as aliens so advanced they might as well be gods to us PunyEarthlings, they're both exempt from this trope anyway.
* Successfully executed by TheChessmaster of ''Literature/TheAssassinsOfTamurin'', but without pushing WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, due to the years of effort she puts into it and the fact that she's crazy.
* Subverted in the Literature/BelisariusSeries where Belisarius's answer to a Gambit Roulette is to keep adding pieces and confusion to the board until Link doesn't know whether it's coming or going. Also subverted (although not entirely successfully) in that Belisarius claims not to calculate in depth but instead to cause confusion and take advantage of the opportunities that arise from this.
* In Fred Saberhagan's ''Literature/BookOfSwords'', and companion series ''Book of Lost Swords'', the character of The Emperor is shown to be very nearly omniscient in his plans, including fathering several children to various otherwise unimportant women around the known world, some 10 years before the events of the first book. Justified since the Emperor is [[spoiler:G-d]].



* In ''The Possessed'', Petr Stepanovic's labyrinthine plan, involving dozens of different characters, is mostly successful - he manages to manipulate people left and right, even if he is shown to completely misunderstand the motivations of some of them, like Stavrogin and Kirillov. Another interesting subversion of the trope is that the more complex parts of the plan (like persuading several persons to kill another man with a flimsy reason) go off like clockwork, and the apparently simpler details (like persuading a suicidal nut to... kill himself) almost fall apart on several occasions.

to:

* In ''The Possessed'', Petr Stepanovic's labyrinthine plan, involving dozens of different characters, is mostly successful - he manages to manipulate people left Niven and right, even if he is shown to completely misunderstand the motivations of some of them, like Stavrogin and Kirillov. Another interesting subversion Barnes's ''Literature/TheCaliforniaVoodooGame'', Dream Park's security team catches on that one of the Game's tournament participants isn't playing fair, and theorize that he's attempting a BatmanGambit to throw the win to Army. However, the suspect can't realistically expect to do this, given the sheer number of variables involved, which would make it this trope is that instead. As it turns out, the more complex parts of the plan (like persuading several persons to kill suspect is plotting another man with a flimsy reason) go off crime entirely, and only set things up to ''look'' like clockwork, an attempt to fix the Game in order to deceive an [[UnwittingPawn accomplice]].
* Subverted in Arturo Perez-Reverte's novel ''Literature/TheClubDumas'' (which was made into ''Film/TheNinthGate''). Corso spends most of the novel dodging two antagonists attempting to steal a rare manuscript and inconveniently discovering corpses along the way. Corso reasonably suspects a massive and powerful conspiracy is dogging his every move. Corso is just being paranoid, as the narrating character explicitly tells him, and there is no relation between the murders
and the apparently simpler details (like persuading a suicidal nut to... kill himself) almost fall apart on several occasions.two manuscripts. The Film assumed that ViewersAreMorons, and so let the plot progress as expected.



* {{Deconstructed}} in ''[[Literature/EvilGeniusTrilogy Evil Genius]]'', a young adult novel by Catherine Jinks. Although the hero, Cadel, is very good at manipulating people, when he attempts a Gambit Roulette, it gets out of his control very quickly, leading to the death of several characters.

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* {{Deconstructed}} in ''[[Literature/EvilGeniusTrilogy Evil Genius]]'', a young adult novel by Catherine Jinks. Although the hero, Cadel, is A very good at manipulating people, common occurrence in [[Creator/IainBanks Iain M. Banks]]'s ''[[Literature/TheCulture Culture]]'' novels. The Mind {{AI}}s are frequently do this, especially when he attempts it comes to the activities of the Culture's two interventionary groups, Contact and Special Circumstances. May potentially be a subversion because Minds can think in Hyperspace and are so ridiculously intelligent and powerful that they can pull off such a plan easily.
* In ''Literature/{{Daemon}}'', by Daniel Suarez, Matthew Sobol, through his Daemon AI, manages to accurately predict and control events throughout the book, even after Sobol's death. While there are humans in the Daemon apparatus, they are not depicted as being in controlling positions. Either Sobol was a master at the
Gambit Roulette, it gets out of or his control very quickly, leading to AI was a master at Speed Chess.
** By
the death time the sequel rolls around, the AI proves to have the ability to predict TheFuture well enough to know exactly where plot critical events will occur. Even with this level of prescience, TheCavalry has to roll in several characters.times to avoid the entire gambit falling apart.
* The Demon King in Kylie Chan's ''Literature/DarkHeavens'' trilogy has one of these running from when he first meets Emma, although since a) it's implied that he was planning One Two Two's downfall even before Emma unexpectedly showed up, and b) he didn't expect her to outsmart him the first time he tried to manipulate her, it could also be considered that he starts off playing GambitSpeedChess which develops into a Roulette.



* ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', Dumbledore had orchestrated or manipulated almost every major event that had taken place in Harry's life since about the halfway point of ''The Half-Blood Prince'', with the ultimate purpose of Voldemort's destruction.
** Also in ''Deathly Hallows'', Dumbledore's method of getting Harry to find the Hallows relies on random encounters - for example, Hermione only recognised the symbol in her book because she happened to meet Luna's dad at Fleur and Bill's wedding. The same goes for Harry finding out [[spoiler: he is a Horcrux]]; if he hadn't been there when [[spoiler: Snape died]] he would never have [[spoiler: made his HeroicSacrifice and Voldemort would've stayed immortal]]. To be fair, [[spoiler:Snape]] was supposed to tell Harry - that's why he asks that Voldemort send him into Hogwarts during the Battle - but didn't do so in time. That is why he is scared when [[spoiler:Voldemort tells him that he is going to kill him]] - he thinks he has failed. No excuse for the symbol, though Dumbeldore [[HandWave handwaves]] it by mentioning that Hermione wouldn't rest until she knew what it meant, so he assumed she would work it out ''somehow'', just not necessarily from Xeno Lovegood.
*** Even if Xeno hadn't been wearing the symbol, they would have found it on Peverell's grave in Godric's Hollow, which everyone and their goldfish knew Harry would go back to. And remember that Dumbledore ''didn't'' want Harry to find the Hallows; he feared that Harry would fall into the same temptation that he had, so he gave Hermione the book that warns about their dangers in the hope that she would "slow Harry up" if he did decide to chase them down.
* Gen from ''Literature/TheQueensThief'' series manages this all the time. Awesomeness ensues.
* In the ''Literature/YoungBond'' book ''Literature/DoubleOrDie'', a teacher at Eton is kidnapped and only has enough time to send a letter confirming his resignation and send his last crossword to ''The Times''. In this, he manages to get clues to Bond and his friends about what's really happened to him, where they can go to find more information and that a friend of his is coming to Eton. This teacher probably attended a school where [[Manga/DeathNote Light]] was the headmaster and [[Franchise/{{Saw}} Jigsaw]] was the art teacher.
* Successfully executed by TheChessmaster of ''Literature/TheAssassinsOfTamurin'', but without pushing WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, due to the years of effort she puts into it and the fact that she's crazy.
* Avrell Torrent, the BigBad of Orson Scott Card's ''[[Literature/OrsonScottCardsEmpire Empire]]'', has been setting up a massive Gambit Roulette that would make Palpatine envious for decades.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', Dumbledore had orchestrated or manipulated almost every major event
Most of Bärlach's actions in ''Literature/DerRichterUndSeinHenker'' are based on this, with it being one of the main themes of the book.
* At the end of the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', Lord Vetinari discusses his BatmanGambit with Vimes, making a big deal out of the fact
that had taken place in Harry's life since about he managed to stop the halfway point of ''The Half-Blood Prince'', with war before too many people were killed ("Bought and sold? Perhaps. But not, I think, needlessly spent"). Except that we already know that there's a parallel universe where the ultimate purpose of Voldemort's destruction.
Klatchians took Ankh-Morpork and the entire Watch was killed ''before'' he unleashed his Gambit, and the difference was a decision by Vimes that could have gone either way and that Lord V wasn't in a position to know anything about.
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'':
** Also in ''Deathly Hallows'', Dumbledore's method of getting The book ''Literature/SmallFavor'' features a subversion. Harry to find considers the Hallows relies on random encounters - for example, Hermione only recognised the symbol in her book because she happened enemy's plot to meet Luna's dad at Fleur and Bill's wedding. The same goes for be so complex it simply should not be possible, until Murphy points out that Harry finding out [[spoiler: he is really IS that predictable, and that the villains stood to gain by doing what they are doing, whether or not Harry acted as planned.
** Martin's actions in ''Changes'' play it straight. He engineered an incredibly complex plot, betrayed his entire organization and his closest allies, and became
a Horcrux]]; ''triple'' agent in the hope of a grand masterstroke that would destroy his enemies. It ended up working, but if he Harry hadn't been there when [[spoiler: Snape died]] he would never have [[spoiler: made his HeroicSacrifice and Voldemort would've stayed immortal]]. To be fair, [[spoiler:Snape]] was supposed able to tell Harry - that's why he asks that Voldemort send him into Hogwarts during take on the Battle - but didn't do so in time. That is why he is scared when [[spoiler:Voldemort tells him that he is going to kill him]] - he thinks he has failed. No excuse ''entire'' Red Court, or if the Red King had stopped grandstanding for the symbol, though Dumbeldore [[HandWave handwaves]] it by mentioning that Hermione wouldn't rest until she knew what it meant, so he assumed she would work it out ''somehow'', just not necessarily from Xeno Lovegood.
*** Even if Xeno hadn't been wearing the symbol, they
ten seconds, it would have found it on Peverell's grave in Godric's Hollow, which everyone and their goldfish knew Harry would go back to. And remember that Dumbledore ''didn't'' want Harry to find the Hallows; he feared that Harry would fall into the same temptation that he had, so he gave Hermione the book that warns about their dangers in the hope that she would "slow Harry up" if he did decide to chase them down.
* Gen from ''Literature/TheQueensThief'' series manages this all the time. Awesomeness ensues.
* In the ''Literature/YoungBond'' book ''Literature/DoubleOrDie'', a teacher at Eton is kidnapped and only has enough time to send a letter confirming his resignation and send his last crossword to ''The Times''. In this, he manages to get clues to Bond and his friends about what's really happened to him, where they can go to find more information and that a friend of his is coming to Eton. This teacher probably attended a school where [[Manga/DeathNote Light]] was the headmaster and [[Franchise/{{Saw}} Jigsaw]] was the art teacher.
* Successfully executed by TheChessmaster of ''Literature/TheAssassinsOfTamurin'', but without pushing WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, due to the years of effort she puts into it and the fact that she's crazy.
* Avrell Torrent, the BigBad of Orson Scott Card's ''[[Literature/OrsonScottCardsEmpire Empire]]'', has been setting up a massive Gambit Roulette that would make Palpatine envious for decades.
failed completely.



* ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' by Creator/AgathaChristie involves a person who not only wants to kill 10 people who got away with a crime, but to do it in a certain order (from least horrible crimes to most horrible), and to make the deaths fit a [[PoeticSerialKiller nursery rhyme that he/she happened to like]]. So many things had to go right: if a certain victim had not died last or had shot rather than hung himself/herself under psychological stress, or if someone had seen the killer after his/her "death," or if the doctor had been less gullible, or if a sea storm had not sprung up, preventing any rescuer from reaching Indian Island, or if the killer's body had not rotted enough for the time of death to be uncertain, etc., that it was almost impossible for everything to work out perfectly in the end. Yet it did. With the occasional PlotHole added into it, such as the gun having only the fingerprints of the last person to touch it, despite its owner also having handled it.
** TheFilmOfTheBook does away with the silliness with the result that the killer's plan ultimately fails, and the last two intended victims survive.
** There is another TheFilmOfTheBook (USSR, 1988) which repeats the book with one exception: in the end the killer, instead of wiping away all clues, just shoots himself/herself.
** ''After the Funeral'' is much in the same vein. Miss Gilchrist's entire plot hinged on every single member of the family not recognizing their own aunt at Richard Abernethie's funeral and believing that Richard had indeed been murdered. Even when one takes into account that none of the family members had seen their aunt in a long time, it still doesn't explain why they didn't notice that Miss Gilchrist - with whom they spent several days in the same house - looked almost exactly like the 'Aunt Cora' they had recently seen at the funeral. It also stands to reason that after the real Cora's death, a family member would have to identify the body, thus exposing the deception. Miss Gilchrist's plan to poison herself so as to appear innocent could also have colossally backfired.
** The plot in ''Evil Under the Sun'' is another example. The murderer/s not only rely on synchronizing their movements according to a very precise schedule, but also arrange for the body to be "discovered" before the actual murder takes place, while the unsuspecting intended victim is hiding nearby. There are a number of ways that could have gone wrong...
* A lot of early detective fiction relies on {{Gambit Roulette}}s to the point where Raymond Chandler discusses it as a failing of the genre in his essay "The Simple Art of Murder".
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** Jake's plan to infiltrate and capture the Yeerk pool ship is a complex BatmanGambit that includes the manipulation of no less than eight separate factions, brilliantly executed by a sixteen-year-old kid of average intelligence.
** The true {{Chessmaster}}s in the series are the Ellimist and Crayak. The Ellimist's backstory begins with his favourite game being to achieve world/system domination by proxy in a simulation by changing just one factor. In the game he decides to have the clouds on a moon part to give the inhabitants the urge to travel (he loses the game though). Everything that happens in the series (including the creation of at least two highly advanced races) is implied or outright stated to be the result of his subtle moves in his overall game against Crayak.
** The Ellimist is a subversion however, since he loses. He loses ''a lot''. He was called "the greatest loser" more than once. It's not until he meets the Andalites that he starts to truly reverse that trend, and then he becomes a god and is kinda exempt from this trope.
** Cassie's surrender of the blue box. She lets Tom steal it from Jake, counting on the gut feeling that giving Yeerks morphing power will cause mass defection in their ranks, as a Yeerks trapped in morph will have no need to feed from the Yeerk pool and thus no longer depend on the Empire. However, she doesn't reveal this to have been her intention until after the defections start happening, making it seem like impossibly good foresight. Not to mention that's a plan that also creates a ton of risks, culminating with [[spoiler:Rachel's death.]]
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'':
** The book ''Literature/SmallFavor'' features a subversion. Harry considers the enemy's plot to be so complex it simply should not be possible, until Murphy points out that Harry really IS that predictable, and that the villains stood to gain by doing what they are doing, whether or not Harry acted as planned.
** Martin's actions in ''Changes'' play it straight. He engineered an incredibly complex plot, betrayed his entire organization and his closest allies, and became a ''triple'' agent in the hope of a grand masterstroke that would destroy his enemies. It ended up working, but if Harry hadn't been able to take on the ''entire'' Red Court, or if the Red King had stopped grandstanding for just ten seconds, it would have failed completely.
* One [[EpilepticTrees fan interpretation]] of the ''StarWars'' [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] is based on the idea that TheEmpire was instituted because Palpatine knew the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] were going to invade.
** In ''Literature/OutboundFlight'', an agent of Sidious states that his plans to take control are to prepare for the Yuuzhan Vong invasion (though they're only known as distant invaders at that point). The book cleverly leaves it unmentioned whether Sidious ''really'' knew they were coming, and whether this was ''truly'' part of his justification for a power grab. Several characters comment that the threat of unknown invaders is a convenient excuse. Then again, he ''is'' a MagnificentBastard with insight bordering on omniscience.
*** Thrawn's actions in the Literature/HandOfThrawn Duology were retroactively made part of this conspiracy when the Literature/NewJediOrder era rolled around. Carefully cloning entire families worth of an extremely talented pilot with a bit of Thrawn's own brilliant mind, then ingraining in them an attachment to the worlds to which they were dispatched, all for the purpose of having a grass roots sleeper cell on numerous worlds, ideally positioned to help drive back the Yuuzhan Vong if the central military organization of the galaxy (regardless of whether it was the Empire, made strong by Thrawn or the New Republic, ''forced to become strong because of him'') were disabled.
** A similar plot was hatched in ''Literature/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. More accurately, its sequel, which proposed that Revan's "fall" to the Dark Side and his subsequent conquering of the Republic (carefully leaving intact key positions and structures) was just to prepare for the coming of the "true Sith" lurking outside the galaxy, making Revan a WellIntentionedExtremist. This was all from the perspective of Revan's teacher, so take it with a grain of salt. Though even if you think Revan was just flat-out evil, this theory has some merit: you can't exactly conquer the galaxy if a bunch of crazy "true sith" destroy it. This was canonized by the MMO, with the added twist that the Sith Emperor thought Revan was working for him. He later joined up with the Exile from the second game to launch a first strike against the Emperor, which bought the Republic a few centuries. [[spoiler: ''Shadow of Revan'' reveals that this rapid changing of sides literally broke his soul.]]
** ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' has a subversion: When [[spoiler: Corran Horn]] shows up with information that can exonerate [[spoiler: Tycho Celchu]] the prosecutor tries to argue that he is an Imperial plant. This is however summarily thrown out by the judge, who points out for that to be true, the Imperials would have had to have information they could not have had in the relevant timeframe, and would be a sign of near perfect precognition.
* Subverted in the Literature/BelisariusSeries where Belisarius's answer to a Gambit Roulette is to keep adding pieces and confusion to the board until Link doesn't know whether it's coming or going. Also subverted (although not entirely successfully) in that Belisarius claims not to calculate in depth but instead to cause confusion and take advantage of the opportunities that arise from this.
* In the ''Literature/LegacyOfTheDrowSeries'' by R.A. Salvatore, Jarlaxle at first appears to be a ManipulativeBastard. In the later books, Jarlaxle muses that most of his plans are in fact Gambit Roulettes. Whenever he stirs up chaos, he always seems to come out on top. It's also hinted in later books ''he is the chosen of a god of chaos''.
* In ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'', Dunyain are masters of this. They can calculate probabilities and conceive of great, sweeping plans to achieve their objectives, then make adjustments as events develop. The first trilogy is one giant gambit roulette by Moenghus. Kellhus is frequently described as navigating threads of probability, with opportunities closing with every minute action he takes.
* Subverted in Arturo Perez-Reverte's novel ''Literature/TheClubDumas'' (which was made into ''Film/TheNinthGate''). Corso spends most of the novel dodging two antagonists attempting to steal a rare manuscript and inconveniently discovering corpses along the way. Corso reasonably suspects a massive and powerful conspiracy is dogging his every move. Corso is just being paranoid, as the narrating character explicitly tells him, and there is no relation between the murders and the two manuscripts. The Film assumed that ViewersAreMorons, and so let the plot progress as expected.

to:

* ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' by Creator/AgathaChristie involves a person who not only wants to kill 10 people who got away with a crime, but to do it in a certain order (from least horrible crimes to most horrible), and to make Avrell Torrent, the deaths fit a [[PoeticSerialKiller nursery rhyme that he/she happened to like]]. So many things had to go right: if a certain victim had not died last or had shot rather than hung himself/herself under psychological stress, or if someone had seen the killer after his/her "death," or if the doctor had BigBad of Orson Scott Card's ''[[Literature/OrsonScottCardsEmpire Empire]]'', has been less gullible, or if a sea storm had not sprung up, preventing any rescuer from reaching Indian Island, or if the killer's body had not rotted enough for the time of death to be uncertain, etc., that it was almost impossible for everything to work out perfectly in the end. Yet it did. With the occasional PlotHole added into it, such as the gun having only the fingerprints of the last person to touch it, despite its owner also having handled it.
** TheFilmOfTheBook does away with the silliness with the result that the killer's plan ultimately fails, and the last two intended victims survive.
** There is another TheFilmOfTheBook (USSR, 1988) which repeats the book with one exception: in the end the killer, instead of wiping away all clues, just shoots himself/herself.
** ''After the Funeral'' is much in the same vein. Miss Gilchrist's entire plot hinged on every single member of the family not recognizing their own aunt at Richard Abernethie's funeral and believing that Richard had indeed been murdered. Even when one takes into account that none of the family members had seen their aunt in a long time, it still doesn't explain why they didn't notice that Miss Gilchrist - with whom they spent several days in the same house - looked almost exactly like the 'Aunt Cora' they had recently seen at the funeral. It also stands to reason that after the real Cora's death, a family member would have to identify the body, thus exposing the deception. Miss Gilchrist's plan to poison herself so as to appear innocent could also have colossally backfired.
** The plot in ''Evil Under the Sun'' is another example. The murderer/s not only rely on synchronizing their movements according to a very precise schedule, but also arrange for the body to be "discovered" before the actual murder takes place, while the unsuspecting intended victim is hiding nearby. There are a number of ways that could have gone wrong...
* A lot of early detective fiction relies on {{Gambit Roulette}}s to the point where Raymond Chandler discusses it as a failing of the genre in his essay "The Simple Art of Murder".
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** Jake's plan to infiltrate and capture the Yeerk pool ship is a complex BatmanGambit that includes the manipulation of no less than eight separate factions, brilliantly executed by a sixteen-year-old kid of average intelligence.
** The true {{Chessmaster}}s in the series are the Ellimist and Crayak. The Ellimist's backstory begins with his favourite game being to achieve world/system domination by proxy in a simulation by changing just one factor. In the game he decides to have the clouds on a moon part to give the inhabitants the urge to travel (he loses the game though). Everything that happens in the series (including the creation of at least two highly advanced races) is implied or outright stated to be the result of his subtle moves in his overall game against Crayak.
** The Ellimist is a subversion however, since he loses. He loses ''a lot''. He was called "the greatest loser" more than once. It's not until he meets the Andalites that he starts to truly reverse that trend, and then he becomes a god and is kinda exempt from this trope.
** Cassie's surrender of the blue box. She lets Tom steal it from Jake, counting on the gut feeling that giving Yeerks morphing power will cause mass defection in their ranks, as a Yeerks trapped in morph will have no need to feed from the Yeerk pool and thus no longer depend on the Empire. However, she doesn't reveal this to have been her intention until after the defections start happening, making it seem like impossibly good foresight. Not to mention that's a plan that also creates a ton of risks, culminating with [[spoiler:Rachel's death.]]
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'':
** The book ''Literature/SmallFavor'' features a subversion. Harry considers the enemy's plot to be so complex it simply should not be possible, until Murphy points out that Harry really IS that predictable, and that the villains stood to gain by doing what they are doing, whether or not Harry acted as planned.
** Martin's actions in ''Changes'' play it straight. He engineered an incredibly complex plot, betrayed his entire organization and his closest allies, and became a ''triple'' agent in the hope of a grand masterstroke that would destroy his enemies. It ended
setting up working, but if Harry hadn't been able to take on the ''entire'' Red Court, or if the Red King had stopped grandstanding for just ten seconds, it would have failed completely.
* One [[EpilepticTrees fan interpretation]] of the ''StarWars'' [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] is based on the idea that TheEmpire was instituted because Palpatine knew the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] were going to invade.
** In ''Literature/OutboundFlight'', an agent of Sidious states that his plans to take control are to prepare for the Yuuzhan Vong invasion (though they're only known as distant invaders at that point). The book cleverly leaves it unmentioned whether Sidious ''really'' knew they were coming, and whether this was ''truly'' part of his justification for
a power grab. Several characters comment that the threat of unknown invaders is a convenient excuse. Then again, he ''is'' a MagnificentBastard with insight bordering on omniscience.
*** Thrawn's actions in the Literature/HandOfThrawn Duology were retroactively made part of this conspiracy when the Literature/NewJediOrder era rolled around. Carefully cloning entire families worth of an extremely talented pilot with a bit of Thrawn's own brilliant mind, then ingraining in them an attachment to the worlds to which they were dispatched, all for the purpose of having a grass roots sleeper cell on numerous worlds, ideally positioned to help drive back the Yuuzhan Vong if the central military organization of the galaxy (regardless of whether it was the Empire, made strong by Thrawn or the New Republic, ''forced to become strong because of him'') were disabled.
** A similar plot was hatched in ''Literature/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. More accurately, its sequel, which proposed that Revan's "fall" to the Dark Side and his subsequent conquering of the Republic (carefully leaving intact key positions and structures) was just to prepare for the coming of the "true Sith" lurking outside the galaxy, making Revan a WellIntentionedExtremist. This was all from the perspective of Revan's teacher, so take it with a grain of salt. Though even if you think Revan was just flat-out evil, this theory has some merit: you can't exactly conquer the galaxy if a bunch of crazy "true sith" destroy it. This was canonized by the MMO, with the added twist that the Sith Emperor thought Revan was working for him. He later joined up with the Exile from the second game to launch a first strike against the Emperor, which bought the Republic a few centuries. [[spoiler: ''Shadow of Revan'' reveals that this rapid changing of sides literally broke his soul.]]
** ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' has a subversion: When [[spoiler: Corran Horn]] shows up with information that can exonerate [[spoiler: Tycho Celchu]] the prosecutor tries to argue that he is an Imperial plant. This is however summarily thrown out by the judge, who points out for that to be true, the Imperials would have had to have information they could not have had in the relevant timeframe, and would be a sign of near perfect precognition.
* Subverted in the Literature/BelisariusSeries where Belisarius's answer to a
massive Gambit Roulette is to keep adding pieces and confusion to the board until Link doesn't know whether it's coming or going. Also subverted (although not entirely successfully) in that Belisarius claims not would make Palpatine envious for decades.
* From ''Literature/EncyclopediaBrown'', we have a robber planning
to calculate in depth strike as the victim does his grocery shopping, but instead calculates he won't have enough time. No problem, just ask him to cause confusion pick up four tubes of toothpaste, extending his grocery list from 7 to 11 items and thus forcing him to take a non-express lane. So the plan is: Our victim won't question why the man wants ''four'' tubes of toothpaste and will proceed to buy them all. Our victim will be honorable and take advantage of the opportunities a non-express lane for being one item over (since that arise from this.
* In
fourth tube of toothpaste was ''so important''). This will slow our victim down significantly enough to finish robbing his house. (This one, at least, was given a HandWave-- apparently the ''Literature/LegacyOfTheDrowSeries'' by R.A. Salvatore, Jarlaxle at first appears to be a ManipulativeBastard. In supermarket in question is notorious for all of its non-express lanes being glacially slow... [[VoodooShark all the later books, Jarlaxle muses more reason why our victim might choose to take the express lane despite that most 11th item]].)
* {{Deconstructed}} in ''[[Literature/EvilGeniusTrilogy Evil Genius]]'', a young adult novel by Catherine Jinks. Although the hero, Cadel, is very good at manipulating people, when he attempts a Gambit Roulette, it gets out
of his plans are in fact Gambit Roulettes. Whenever he stirs up chaos, he always seems control very quickly, leading to come out on top. It's also hinted in later books ''he is the chosen death of a god of chaos''.
* In ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'', Dunyain are masters of this. They can calculate probabilities and conceive of great, sweeping plans to achieve their objectives, then make adjustments as events develop. The first trilogy is one giant gambit roulette by Moenghus. Kellhus is frequently described as navigating threads of probability, with opportunities closing with every minute action he takes.
* Subverted in Arturo Perez-Reverte's novel ''Literature/TheClubDumas'' (which was made into ''Film/TheNinthGate''). Corso spends most of the novel dodging two antagonists attempting to steal a rare manuscript and inconveniently discovering corpses along the way. Corso reasonably suspects a massive and powerful conspiracy is dogging his every move. Corso is just being paranoid, as the narrating character explicitly tells him, and there is no relation between the murders and the two manuscripts. The Film assumed that ViewersAreMorons, and so let the plot progress as expected.
several characters.



* At the end of ''Literature/GoodOmens'', the characters begin to suspect (though they certainly can't confirm it) that the whole plot was a Gambit Roulette by {{God}}. Could be a {{justified|Trope}} example for once...
* ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', Dumbledore had orchestrated or manipulated almost every major event that had taken place in Harry's life since about the halfway point of ''The Half-Blood Prince'', with the ultimate purpose of Voldemort's destruction.
** Also in ''Deathly Hallows'', Dumbledore's method of getting Harry to find the Hallows relies on random encounters - for example, Hermione only recognised the symbol in her book because she happened to meet Luna's dad at Fleur and Bill's wedding. The same goes for Harry finding out [[spoiler: he is a Horcrux]]; if he hadn't been there when [[spoiler: Snape died]] he would never have [[spoiler: made his HeroicSacrifice and Voldemort would've stayed immortal]]. To be fair, [[spoiler:Snape]] was supposed to tell Harry - that's why he asks that Voldemort send him into Hogwarts during the Battle - but didn't do so in time. That is why he is scared when [[spoiler:Voldemort tells him that he is going to kill him]] - he thinks he has failed. No excuse for the symbol, though Dumbeldore [[HandWave handwaves]] it by mentioning that Hermione wouldn't rest until she knew what it meant, so he assumed she would work it out ''somehow'', just not necessarily from Xeno Lovegood.
*** Even if Xeno hadn't been wearing the symbol, they would have found it on Peverell's grave in Godric's Hollow, which everyone and their goldfish knew Harry would go back to. And remember that Dumbledore ''didn't'' want Harry to find the Hallows; he feared that Harry would fall into the same temptation that he had, so he gave Hermione the book that warns about their dangers in the hope that she would "slow Harry up" if he did decide to chase them down.
* Exploited in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' with the Infinite Improbability drive, a faster-than-light travel drive that relies on the fact that, from a quantum physics standpoint, it isn't ''entirely'' impossible for an electron to suddenly be several light years away- just unfathomably unlikely. By the same logic, it's not impossible for an entire atom to do the same thing. The Infinite Improbability Drive works by manipulating probability so that nigh-impossible things happen, specifically [[UpToEleven causing every atom in the entire]] ''[[UpToEleven ship]]'' [[UpToEleven to appear on the other side of the galaxy, exactly where you want to be]].
* Jared from ''Literature/TheHost'' initially believes everything Wanderer does is proof that she's secretly a Seeker trying to infiltrate the group. This starts to annoy the others since he keeps it up way too long and even Jared starts to realize how ridiculous he's being.
* In Lee Child's Literature/JackReacher novels, basically everything the main character does in action sequences is one of these, often relying on flimsy guesswork to construct a plausible scenario, which just so happens to be exactly right. The most vivid example so far being when he - given a vague description of a character's height, weight and handedness, manages to hit him in the arm with a sniper rifle from a huge distance while the target was INSIDE A (wooden) BUILDING (he was aiming for the arm to disarm his weapon). Reacher had no reason to know where in the building the guy was standing, he just 'assumed' he would be standing behind the door waiting for Reacher to enter. The entire series is based on such coincidences and vague assumptions.
* In the ''Literature/LegacyOfTheDrowSeries'' by R.A. Salvatore, Jarlaxle at first appears to be a ManipulativeBastard. In the later books, Jarlaxle muses that most of his plans are in fact Gambit Roulettes. Whenever he stirs up chaos, he always seems to come out on top. It's also hinted in later books ''he is the chosen of a god of chaos''.
* Sharon Lee and Steve Miller's Literature/LiadenUniverse: aware of the Department of the Interior's machinations, Liaden's Scouts hatch a cunning plan: they will destroy the [=DoI=] from within by ''feeding Val Con yos'Phelium to it'' without giving him any forewarning or preparation, counting on his line's WeirdnessMagnet nature to throw a monkeywrench into its schemes. Given the way ThereAreNoCoincidences in the Liaden Universe, this effectively turns a Roulette Gambit ''into'' a BatmanGambit.
--> Clonak stared at him as if he’d taken leave of his wits. “Well, of ''course'' we gave you to them, Shadow! Who else did we have more likely to trump them than a first-in, pure-blood yos’Phelium scout ''commander''? Concentrated random action. Would we waste such a weapon? Would you? I didn’t think so.[...]"
* Subverted in ''Literature/TheManWhoWasThursday'', when Syme carefully plans a conversation with a stranger line for line, before his colleagues point out that he can't predict exactly what the stranger will say.
* A heroic version of the Gambit Roulette is found in ''Master of the Five Magics'', by Creator/LyndonHardy. The fate of the world depends on a thaumaturge solving the puzzle of a castle in order to find an alchemical solution which will lead to a magical sphere which, when completed, will lead to the study of sorcery. After that, he has to come close enough to the chamber of a wizard in suspended animation to recognize the location, then awaken the wizard. Among the things that make this truly roulette: alchemy is a magical gamble, where one thousand starts can end in two successful potions, or none; getting the magical sphere correct depends on recognizing a faint difference, correcting the ritual for it, and finishing the crafting before the sphere explodes; the only reason Alodar is anywhere the tomb is because the ship he's on sinks nearby; and the plan finishes with what amounts to, "Hopefully, this person can save the world."



* Apparently, everything [[Literature/ThePendragonAdventure Saint Dane]] does is part of his grand plan for Halla. A lot of which is manipulating Bobby (and Mark and Courtney) to do exactly what he wants them to do without realizing it. And then stepping in to show Bobby how horribly he's been defeated [[HopeSpot just after he thought he won.]]
* Fortune Teller Shalice of ''Literature/ThePiloFamilyCircus'' demonstrates her understanding of the trope in this statement:
-->Man raises his middle finger at a passing car; the driver ponders it, wondering what he'd done to offend the stranger, misses his route home while distracted, and collides with a van, killing the driver who was the real target of the exercise. The simplest of scenarios, but the setups could be so elaborate and huge they shaped the course of history.
** One of her ''simplest'' manipulations involves watering the lawn in front of the Acrobats' tent; when one of them left the tent, he slips on the wet grass, and angrily blames [[MonsterClown the pranksters in the Clown Division]]. He then steals a crate of fireworks to take revenge on the clowns, only to leave it by the Circus Funhouse, where one of the local dwarfs uses it as a target in a cigar-flicking game: the resulting explosion takes out half the funhouse, and forces the management to start relying on Shalice for help again. [[spoiler: Or at least, it ''should'' have.]]

to:

* Apparently, everything [[Literature/ThePendragonAdventure Saint Dane]] does ''Franchise/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy'':
** The entire series
is part the culmination of a millennia-long ThanatosGambit by the Shard Preservation, requiring the exact right things to happen at the exact right times in order to 1: Create a human who could [[spoiler:take up Preservation's power and use it to kill the Shard Ruin (something Preservation himself could never do due to his overpowering instinct to preserve)]], and 2: Create a human [[spoiler:perfectly balanced between both Preservation and Ruin, so he could take up ''both'' Shards once the holders were dead and become God of a reborn world]]. Of course, due to the nature of Preservation's power, he is very very good at predicting the future, but predicting the future thousands of years ''after you died'' is still a pretty big roulette. It did help that Ruin was very very ''bad'' at predicting the future.
** Ruin himself had another, much smaller GambitRoulette. Most
of his grand plans were just "cause as much chaos as possible," so the details weren't really important, his plan for Halla. A lot to [[spoiler:be released from the Well of which is manipulating Bobby (and Mark Ascension]] was definitely this. He needed to get a [[BloodMagic spike]] in a very specific person so he could influence them, get [[spoiler:the Lord Ruler]] killed a year before power returned to the Well, and Courtney) then get that spiked person to do exactly what he wants them to do the Well at a very specific hour without realizing it. And then stepping in to show Bobby how horribly he's been defeated [[HopeSpot just after he thought he won.]]
* Fortune Teller Shalice of ''Literature/ThePiloFamilyCircus'' demonstrates her understanding of the trope in
anyone interfering. Considering that this statement:
-->Man raises his
plan took place over a thousand years, this is roughly the equivalent of hitting the bullseye on a dartboard on a moving truck in the middle finger at a passing car; the driver ponders it, wondering what he'd done to offend the stranger, misses his route home while distracted, and collides with a van, killing the driver who was the real target of the exercise. The simplest of scenarios, but the setups could be so elaborate and huge they shaped the course of history.
** One of her ''simplest'' manipulations involves watering the lawn in front of the Acrobats' tent; when one of them left the tent, he slips on the wet grass, and angrily blames [[MonsterClown the pranksters in the Clown Division]]. He then steals
a crate of fireworks to take revenge on the clowns, only to leave it by the Circus Funhouse, where one of the local dwarfs uses it as a target in a cigar-flicking game: the resulting explosion takes out half the funhouse, and forces the management to start relying on Shalice for help again. [[spoiler: Or at least, it ''should'' have.]]storm.



* Apparently, everything Saint Dane of ''Literature/ThePendragonAdventure'' does is part of his grand plan for Halla. A lot of which is manipulating Bobby (and Mark and Courtney) to do exactly what he wants them to do without realizing it. And then stepping in to show Bobby how horribly he's been defeated [[HopeSpot just after he thought he won.]]
* Kronos in ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' earned his nickname, the Crooked One, for excelling at this. ''Whenever'' his plans are thwarted, he or one of his minions says something along the lines of "we planned it that way". While he's still rotting away in Tartarus, he assembles an army, brings a dead girl back to life, kidnaps a goddess, and plans an invasion. After finding a way to possess Luke's body, he becomes almost unstoppable and is barely defeated in the end. Apparently the one thing he didn't plan for was Luke regaining control of his body just in time, resulting in RedemptionEqualsDeath for Luke AndIMustScream for Kronos.
* Fortune Teller Shalice of ''Literature/ThePiloFamilyCircus'' demonstrates her understanding of the trope in this statement:
-->Man raises his middle finger at a passing car; the driver ponders it, wondering what he'd done to offend the stranger, misses his route home while distracted, and collides with a van, killing the driver who was the real target of the exercise. The simplest of scenarios, but the setups could be so elaborate and huge they shaped the course of history.
** One of her ''simplest'' manipulations involves watering the lawn in front of the Acrobats' tent; when one of them left the tent, he slips on the wet grass, and angrily blames [[MonsterClown the pranksters in the Clown Division]]. He then steals a crate of fireworks to take revenge on the clowns, only to leave it by the Circus Funhouse, where one of the local dwarfs uses it as a target in a cigar-flicking game: the resulting explosion takes out half the funhouse, and forces the management to start relying on Shalice for help again. [[spoiler: Or at least, it ''should'' have.]]
* In ''The Possessed'', Petr Stepanovic's labyrinthine plan, involving dozens of different characters, is mostly successful - he manages to manipulate people left and right, even if he is shown to completely misunderstand the motivations of some of them, like Stavrogin and Kirillov. Another interesting subversion of the trope is that the more complex parts of the plan (like persuading several persons to kill another man with a flimsy reason) go off like clockwork, and the apparently simpler details (like persuading a suicidal nut to... kill himself) almost fall apart on several occasions.
* Gen from ''Literature/TheQueensThief'' series manages this all the time. Awesomeness ensues.



* From ''Literature/EncyclopediaBrown'', we have a robber planning to strike as the victim does his grocery shopping, but calculates he won't have enough time. No problem, just ask him to pick up four tubes of toothpaste, extending his grocery list from 7 to 11 items and thus forcing him to take a non-express lane. So the plan is: Our victim won't question why the man wants ''four'' tubes of toothpaste and will proceed to buy them all. Our victim will be honorable and take a non-express lane for being one item over (since that fourth tube of toothpaste was ''so important''). This will slow our victim down significantly enough to finish robbing his house. (This one, at least, was given a HandWave-- apparently the supermarket in question is notorious for all of its non-express lanes being glacially slow... [[VoodooShark all the more reason why our victim might choose to take the express lane despite that 11th item]].)
* In Fred Saberhagan's ''Literature/BookOfSwords'', and companion series ''Book of Lost Swords'', the character of The Emperor is shown to be very nearly omniscient in his plans, including fathering several children to various otherwise unimportant women around the known world, some 10 years before the events of the first book. Justified since the Emperor is [[spoiler:G-d]].
* In ''Literature/{{Daemon}}'', by Daniel Suarez, Matthew Sobol, through his Daemon AI, manages to accurately predict and control events throughout the book, even after Sobol's death. While there are humans in the Daemon apparatus, they are not depicted as being in controlling positions. Either Sobol was a master at the Gambit Roulette, or his AI was a master at Speed Chess.
** By the time the sequel rolls around, the AI proves to have the ability to predict TheFuture well enough to know exactly where plot critical events will occur. Even with this level of prescience, TheCavalry has to roll in several times to avoid the entire gambit falling apart.
* A very common occurrence in [[Creator/IainBanks Iain M. Banks]]'s ''[[Literature/TheCulture Culture]]'' novels. The Mind {{AI}}s are frequently do this, especially when it comes to the activities of the Culture's two interventionary groups, Contact and Special Circumstances. May potentially be a subversion because Minds can think in Hyperspace and are so ridiculously intelligent and powerful that they can pull off such a plan easily.
* In Niven and Barnes's ''Literature/TheCaliforniaVoodooGame'', Dream Park's security team catches on that one of the Game's tournament participants isn't playing fair, and theorize that he's attempting a BatmanGambit to throw the win to Army. However, the suspect can't realistically expect to do this, given the sheer number of variables involved, which would make it this trope instead. As it turns out, the suspect is plotting another crime entirely, and only set things up to ''look'' like an attempt to fix the Game in order to deceive an [[UnwittingPawn accomplice]].
* The Demon King in Kylie Chan's ''Literature/DarkHeavens'' trilogy has one of these running from when he first meets Emma, although since a) it's implied that he was planning One Two Two's downfall even before Emma unexpectedly showed up, and b) he didn't expect her to outsmart him the first time he tried to manipulate her, it could also be considered that he starts off playing GambitSpeedChess which develops into a Roulette.
* Used and lampshaded in the ''Bad Blood'' chapter of the ''Literature/{{Trainspotting}}'' novel, where the HIV-positive character Davie pulls this on Alan Venters, the man who gave the HIV to the former's girlfriend by raping her, thus leading to Davie's own contraction of the virus. His plan is to make friends with a dying Venters, so that he is allowed to visit him in hospital, and also with the mother of the rapist's only son so that one day she may trust him enough to let him babysit for her. When this happens Davie drugs the child with a sleep-inducing substance and takes pictures of him, making it look like he violently raped and murdered the boy. Then he shows the pictures to Venters on his deathbed and suffocates him with a pillow, thus filling his last moments in life with immeasurable suffering. This plan depended greatly on random chance (most significantly on Venters staying alive long enough for all the pieces to fall into place), a fact that Davie is well aware of.



* At the end of ''Literature/GoodOmens'', the characters begin to suspect (though they certainly can't confirm it) that the whole plot was a Gambit Roulette by {{God}}. Could be a {{justified|Trope}} example for once...
* Kronos in ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' earned his nickname, the Crooked One, for excelling at this. ''Whenever'' his plans are thwarted, he or one of his minions says something along the lines of "we planned it that way". While he's still rotting away in Tartarus, he assembles an army, brings a dead girl back to life, kidnaps a goddess, and plans an invasion. After finding a way to possess Luke's body, he becomes almost unstoppable and is barely defeated in the end. Apparently the one thing he didn't plan for was Luke regaining control of his body just in time, resulting in RedemptionEqualsDeath for Luke AndIMustScream for Kronos.
* A heroic version of Gambit Roulette is found in ''Master of the Five Magics'', by Creator/LyndonHardy. The fate of the world depends on a thaumaturge solving the puzzle of a castle in order to find an alchemical solution which will lead to a magical sphere which, when completed, will lead to the study of sorcery. After that, he has to come close enough to the chamber of a wizard in suspended animation to recognize the location, then awaken the wizard. Among the things that make this truly roulette: alchemy is a magical gamble, where one thousand starts can end in two successful potions, or none; getting the magical sphere correct depends on recognizing a faint difference, correcting the ritual for it, and finishing the crafting before the sphere explodes; the only reason Alodar is anywhere the tomb is because the ship he's on sinks nearby; and the plan finishes with what amounts to, "Hopefully, this person can save the world."

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* At the end In ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'', Dunyain are masters of ''Literature/GoodOmens'', the characters begin to suspect (though they certainly can't confirm it) that the whole plot was a Gambit Roulette by {{God}}. Could be a {{justified|Trope}} example for once...
* Kronos in ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' earned his nickname, the Crooked One, for excelling at
this. ''Whenever'' his They can calculate probabilities and conceive of great, sweeping plans are thwarted, he or one of his minions says something along the lines of "we planned it that way". While he's still rotting away in Tartarus, he assembles an army, brings a dead girl back to life, kidnaps a goddess, and plans an invasion. After finding a way to possess Luke's body, he becomes almost unstoppable and is barely defeated in the end. Apparently the one thing he didn't plan for was Luke regaining control of his body just in time, resulting in RedemptionEqualsDeath for Luke AndIMustScream for Kronos.
* A heroic version of Gambit Roulette is found in ''Master of the Five Magics'', by Creator/LyndonHardy. The fate of the world depends on a thaumaturge solving the puzzle of a castle in order to find an alchemical solution which will lead to a magical sphere which, when completed, will lead to the study of sorcery. After that, he has to come close enough to the chamber of a wizard in suspended animation to recognize the location,
achieve their objectives, then awaken the wizard. Among the things that make this truly roulette: alchemy adjustments as events develop. The first trilogy is a magical gamble, where one thousand starts can end in two successful potions, or none; getting the magical sphere correct depends on recognizing a faint difference, correcting the ritual for it, and finishing the crafting before the sphere explodes; the only reason Alodar giant gambit roulette by Moenghus. Kellhus is anywhere the tomb is because the ship he's on sinks nearby; and the plan finishes frequently described as navigating threads of probability, with what amounts to, "Hopefully, this person can save the world."opportunities closing with every minute action he takes.



* Sharon Lee and Steve Miller's Literature/LiadenUniverse: aware of the Department of the Interior's machinations, Liaden's Scouts hatch a cunning plan: they will destroy the [=DoI=] from within by ''feeding Val Con yos'Phelium to it'' without giving him any forewarning or preparation, counting on his line's WeirdnessMagnet nature to throw a monkeywrench into its schemes. Given the way ThereAreNoCoincidences in the Liaden Universe, this effectively turns a Roulette Gambit ''into'' a BatmanGambit.
--> Clonak stared at him as if he’d taken leave of his wits. “Well, of ''course'' we gave you to them, Shadow! Who else did we have more likely to trump them than a first-in, pure-blood yos’Phelium scout ''commander''? Concentrated random action. Would we waste such a weapon? Would you? I didn’t think so.[...]"
* At the end of the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', Lord Vetinari discusses his BatmanGambit with Vimes, making a big deal out of the fact that he managed to stop the war before too many people were killed ("Bought and sold? Perhaps. But not, I think, needlessly spent"). Except that we already know that there's a parallel universe where the Klatchians took Ankh-Morpork and the entire Watch was killed ''before'' he unleashed his Gambit, and the difference was a decision by Vimes that could have gone either way and that Lord V wasn't in a position to know anything about.
* Jared from ''Literature/TheHost'' initially believes everything Wanderer does is proof that she's secretly a Seeker trying to infiltrate the group. This starts to annoy the others since he keeps it up way too long and even Jared starts to realize how ridiculous he's being.
* In Lee Child's Literature/JackReacher novels, basically everything the main character does in action sequences is one of these, often relying on flimsy guesswork to construct a plausible scenario, which just so happens to be exactly right. The most vivid example so far being when he - given a vague description of a character's height, weight and handedness, manages to hit him in the arm with a sniper rifle from a huge distance while the target was INSIDE A (wooden) BUILDING (he was aiming for the arm to disarm his weapon). Reacher had no reason to know where in the building the guy was standing, he just 'assumed' he would be standing behind the door waiting for Reacher to enter. The entire series is based on such coincidences and vague assumptions.
* Subverted in ''Literature/TheManWhoWasThursday'', when Syme carefully plans a conversation with a stranger line for line, before his colleagues point out that he can't predict exactly what the stranger will say.
* Most of Bärlach's actions in ''Literature/DerRichterUndSeinHenker'' are based on this, with it being one of the main themes of the book.
* Exploited in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' with the Infinite Improbability drive, a faster-than-light travel drive that relies on the fact that, from a quantum physics standpoint, it isn't ''entirely'' impossible for an electron to suddenly be several light years away- just unfathomably unlikely. By the same logic, it's not impossible for an entire atom to do the same thing. The Infinite Improbability Drive works by manipulating probability so that nigh-impossible things happen, specifically [[UpToEleven causing every atom in the entire]] ''[[UpToEleven ship]]'' [[UpToEleven to appear on the other side of the galaxy, exactly where you want to be]].
* ''Franchise/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy'':
** The entire series is the culmination of a millennia-long ThanatosGambit by the Shard Preservation, requiring the exact right things to happen at the exact right times in order to 1: Create a human who could [[spoiler:take up Preservation's power and use it to kill the Shard Ruin (something Preservation himself could never do due to his overpowering instinct to preserve)]], and 2: Create a human [[spoiler:perfectly balanced between both Preservation and Ruin, so he could take up ''both'' Shards once the holders were dead and become God of a reborn world]]. Of course, due to the nature of Preservation's power, he is very very good at predicting the future, but predicting the future thousands of years ''after you died'' is still a pretty big roulette. It did help that Ruin was very very ''bad'' at predicting the future.
** Ruin himself had another, much smaller GambitRoulette. Most of his plans were just "cause as much chaos as possible," so the details weren't really important, his plan to [[spoiler:be released from the Well of Ascension]] was definitely this. He needed to get a [[BloodMagic spike]] in a very specific person so he could influence them, get [[spoiler:the Lord Ruler]] killed a year before power returned to the Well, and then get that spiked person to the Well at a very specific hour without anyone interfering. Considering that this plan took place over a thousand years, this is roughly the equivalent of hitting the bullseye on a dartboard on a moving truck in the middle of a storm.

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* Sharon Lee and Steve Miller's Literature/LiadenUniverse: aware One [[EpilepticTrees fan interpretation]] of the Department of the Interior's machinations, Liaden's Scouts hatch a cunning plan: they will destroy the [=DoI=] from within by ''feeding Val Con yos'Phelium to it'' without giving him any forewarning or preparation, counting on his line's WeirdnessMagnet nature to throw a monkeywrench into its schemes. Given the way ThereAreNoCoincidences in the Liaden Universe, this effectively turns a Roulette Gambit ''into'' a BatmanGambit.
--> Clonak stared at him as if he’d taken leave of his wits. “Well, of ''course'' we gave you to them, Shadow! Who else did we have more likely to trump them than a first-in, pure-blood yos’Phelium scout ''commander''? Concentrated random action. Would we waste such a weapon? Would you? I didn’t think so.[...]"
* At the end of the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', Lord Vetinari discusses his BatmanGambit with Vimes, making a big deal out of the fact that he managed to stop the war before too many people were killed ("Bought and sold? Perhaps. But not, I think, needlessly spent"). Except that we already know that there's a parallel universe where the Klatchians took Ankh-Morpork and the entire Watch was killed ''before'' he unleashed his Gambit, and the difference was a decision by Vimes that could have gone either way and that Lord V wasn't in a position to know anything about.
* Jared from ''Literature/TheHost'' initially believes everything Wanderer does is proof that she's secretly a Seeker trying to infiltrate the group. This starts to annoy the others since he keeps it up way too long and even Jared starts to realize how ridiculous he's being.
* In Lee Child's Literature/JackReacher novels, basically everything the main character does in action sequences is one of these, often relying on flimsy guesswork to construct a plausible scenario, which just so happens to be exactly right. The most vivid example so far being when he - given a vague description of a character's height, weight and handedness, manages to hit him in the arm with a sniper rifle from a huge distance while the target was INSIDE A (wooden) BUILDING (he was aiming for the arm to disarm his weapon). Reacher had no reason to know where in the building the guy was standing, he just 'assumed' he would be standing behind the door waiting for Reacher to enter. The entire series
''StarWars'' [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] is based on such coincidences and vague assumptions.
* Subverted in ''Literature/TheManWhoWasThursday'', when Syme carefully
the idea that TheEmpire was instituted because Palpatine knew the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] were going to invade.
** In ''Literature/OutboundFlight'', an agent of Sidious states that his
plans to take control are to prepare for the Yuuzhan Vong invasion (though they're only known as distant invaders at that point). The book cleverly leaves it unmentioned whether Sidious ''really'' knew they were coming, and whether this was ''truly'' part of his justification for a conversation power grab. Several characters comment that the threat of unknown invaders is a convenient excuse. Then again, he ''is'' a MagnificentBastard with a stranger line for line, before his colleagues point out that he can't predict exactly what the stranger will say.
* Most of Bärlach's
insight bordering on omniscience.
*** Thrawn's
actions in ''Literature/DerRichterUndSeinHenker'' are based on this, the Literature/HandOfThrawn Duology were retroactively made part of this conspiracy when the Literature/NewJediOrder era rolled around. Carefully cloning entire families worth of an extremely talented pilot with it being one a bit of Thrawn's own brilliant mind, then ingraining in them an attachment to the worlds to which they were dispatched, all for the purpose of having a grass roots sleeper cell on numerous worlds, ideally positioned to help drive back the Yuuzhan Vong if the central military organization of the main themes galaxy (regardless of whether it was the Empire, made strong by Thrawn or the New Republic, ''forced to become strong because of him'') were disabled.
** A similar plot was hatched in ''Literature/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. More accurately, its sequel, which proposed that Revan's "fall" to the Dark Side and his subsequent conquering
of the book.
* Exploited in ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' with the Infinite Improbability drive, a faster-than-light travel drive that relies on the fact that, from a quantum physics standpoint, it isn't ''entirely'' impossible for an electron to suddenly be several light years away-
Republic (carefully leaving intact key positions and structures) was just unfathomably unlikely. By to prepare for the same logic, it's not impossible for an entire atom to do coming of the same thing. The Infinite Improbability Drive works by manipulating probability so that nigh-impossible things happen, specifically [[UpToEleven causing every atom in the entire]] ''[[UpToEleven ship]]'' [[UpToEleven to appear on the other side of "true Sith" lurking outside the galaxy, exactly where you want to be]].
* ''Franchise/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy'':
** The entire series is the culmination of
making Revan a millennia-long ThanatosGambit by the Shard Preservation, requiring the exact right things to happen at the exact right times in order to 1: Create a human who could [[spoiler:take up Preservation's power and use it to kill the Shard Ruin (something Preservation himself could never do due to his overpowering instinct to preserve)]], and 2: Create a human [[spoiler:perfectly balanced between both Preservation and Ruin, so he could take up ''both'' Shards once the holders were dead and become God of a reborn world]]. Of course, due to the nature of Preservation's power, he is very very good at predicting the future, but predicting the future thousands of years ''after you died'' is still a pretty big roulette. It did help that Ruin WellIntentionedExtremist. This was very very ''bad'' at predicting the future.
** Ruin himself had another, much smaller GambitRoulette. Most of his plans were just "cause as much chaos as possible," so the details weren't really important, his plan to [[spoiler:be released
all from the Well perspective of Ascension]] Revan's teacher, so take it with a grain of salt. Though even if you think Revan was definitely this. He needed to get a [[BloodMagic spike]] in a very specific person so he could influence them, get [[spoiler:the Lord Ruler]] killed a year before power returned to just flat-out evil, this theory has some merit: you can't exactly conquer the Well, and then get galaxy if a bunch of crazy "true sith" destroy it. This was canonized by the MMO, with the added twist that spiked person to the Well at Sith Emperor thought Revan was working for him. He later joined up with the Exile from the second game to launch a very specific hour without anyone interfering. Considering first strike against the Emperor, which bought the Republic a few centuries. [[spoiler: ''Shadow of Revan'' reveals that this plan took place over rapid changing of sides literally broke his soul.]]
** ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' has
a thousand years, this is roughly subversion: When [[spoiler: Corran Horn]] shows up with information that can exonerate [[spoiler: Tycho Celchu]] the equivalent of hitting prosecutor tries to argue that he is an Imperial plant. This is however summarily thrown out by the bullseye on a dartboard on a moving truck judge, who points out for that to be true, the Imperials would have had to have information they could not have had in the middle relevant timeframe, and would be a sign of near perfect precognition.
* Used and lampshaded in the ''Bad Blood'' chapter of the ''Literature/{{Trainspotting}}'' novel, where the HIV-positive character Davie pulls this on Alan Venters, the man who gave the HIV to the former's girlfriend by raping her, thus leading to Davie's own contraction of the virus. His plan is to make friends with
a storm.dying Venters, so that he is allowed to visit him in hospital, and also with the mother of the rapist's only son so that one day she may trust him enough to let him babysit for her. When this happens Davie drugs the child with a sleep-inducing substance and takes pictures of him, making it look like he violently raped and murdered the boy. Then he shows the pictures to Venters on his deathbed and suffocates him with a pillow, thus filling his last moments in life with immeasurable suffering. This plan depended greatly on random chance (most significantly on Venters staying alive long enough for all the pieces to fall into place), a fact that Davie is well aware of.
* In the ''Literature/YoungBond'' book ''Literature/DoubleOrDie'', a teacher at Eton is kidnapped and only has enough time to send a letter confirming his resignation and send his last crossword to ''The Times''. In this, he manages to get clues to Bond and his friends about what's really happened to him, where they can go to find more information and that a friend of his is coming to Eton. This teacher probably attended a school where [[Manga/DeathNote Light]] was the headmaster and [[Franchise/{{Saw}} Jigsaw]] was the art teacher.
16th Oct '17 9:53:36 AM lluewhyn
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** Cersei's plot where she successfully killed her husband Robert could be considered this. Her plan was to have his squire indulge him with too much alcohol (that was extra-strength) so that he would be too inebriated to successfully hunt a boar and would run into a "hunting mishap" that would appear to be an accident. However, there were so many ways this could have gone as planned: not finding a boar, King Robert passing out first, other members of the hunting party intervening, etc. This would be fine if it was just one of Cersei's schemes to increase the chances of King Robert getting himself killed innocently (like her ploy to have him enter the Melee), but subsequent conversations reveal that she fully anticipated that he would die to a boar during this outing, even refusing to flee King's Landing and Ned Stark's accusations as she "knows" that Robert won't be coming back to do anything about them. So, she was essentially risking her head by staying at court on the chance that a drunk Robert would get himself killed while hunting.

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** Cersei's plot where she successfully killed her husband Robert could be considered this. Her plan was to have his squire indulge him with too much alcohol (that was extra-strength) so that he would be too inebriated to successfully hunt a boar and would run into a "hunting mishap" that would appear to be an accident. However, there were so many ways this could have not gone as planned: not finding a boar, King Robert passing out first, other members of the hunting party intervening, etc. This would be fine if it was just one of Cersei's schemes to increase the chances of King Robert getting himself killed innocently (like her ploy to have him enter the Melee), but subsequent conversations reveal that she fully anticipated that he would die to a boar during this outing, even refusing to flee King's Landing and Ned Stark's accusations as she "knows" that Robert won't be coming back to do anything about them. So, she was essentially risking her head by staying at court on the chance that a drunk Robert would get himself killed while hunting.
16th Oct '17 9:41:09 AM lluewhyn
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*** What's worse is that Zemo spends the majority of the movie searching for information, the details of which are left deliberately vague to avoid spoiling the twist near the end. So, apparently all of the information for which he is searching just happens to fit exactly into the gambit that he's already started?
13th Oct '17 12:54:02 AM PaulA
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* In Niven and Barnes's ''[[Literature/DreamPark The California Voodoo Game]]'', Dream Park's security team catches on that one of the Game's tournament participants isn't playing fair, and theorize that he's attempting a BatmanGambit to throw the win to Army. However, the suspect can't realistically expect to do this, given the sheer number of variables involved, which would make it this trope instead. As it turns out, the suspect is plotting another crime entirely, and only set things up to ''look'' like an attempt to fix the Game in order to deceive an [[UnwittingPawn accomplice]].

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* In Niven and Barnes's ''[[Literature/DreamPark The California Voodoo Game]]'', ''Literature/TheCaliforniaVoodooGame'', Dream Park's security team catches on that one of the Game's tournament participants isn't playing fair, and theorize that he's attempting a BatmanGambit to throw the win to Army. However, the suspect can't realistically expect to do this, given the sheer number of variables involved, which would make it this trope instead. As it turns out, the suspect is plotting another crime entirely, and only set things up to ''look'' like an attempt to fix the Game in order to deceive an [[UnwittingPawn accomplice]].
10th Oct '17 5:16:16 PM Scistorm
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** Near the end they count on the police being so incompetent that Morgan Freeman's character is successfully framed for a crime he obviously didn't commit (who packs stolen money in their car like that? On top of that the Horseman are known for being "tricky" and Freeman was known for getting on their bad side so obviously he was being framed). Even with Dylan's help it's really not justified.

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** Near the end they count on the police being so incompetent that Morgan Freeman's character is successfully framed for a crime he obviously didn't commit (who packs stolen money in their car like that? On top of that the Horseman Horsemen are known for being "tricky" and Freeman was known for getting on their bad side so obviously he was being framed). Even with Dylan's help [[spoiler:Dylan's help]], it's really not justified.
1st Oct '17 8:55:51 PM WanderingBrowser
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** This is also why many fans don't like Amanda Waller's revealed plan in the show's final episode: to create a "replacement" for Batman, she finds a couple who seem to be a good matchup for the psychological profile of the Wayne's, has the husband subjected to genetic modifications that cause him to produce what is genetically Bruce Wayne's sperm, then arranges for them to be murdered at the same age when Bruce's parents were dead. The amount of ways that could have gone wrong are too myriad to list -- notably, the plan ''did'' go off the rails in that the assassin Waller contracted to do the job refused to follow through.
27th Sep '17 6:36:21 PM Bionicman
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* The aggregate actions of the Joker in ''Film/TheDarkKnight'': for an agent of chaos with a stated disdain for [[TheChessmaster Chessmasters]], he effortlessly pulls together seemingly random and improbable events into a single overall scheme. A good example is his "race for two hostages scheme", which counts on 1. Joker being captured and taking to a holding cell both just close enough yet far enough from the spot of his scheme, 2. Batman being present at the jail to interrogate him, 3. Batman being in love with Rachel Dawes even though the only proof Joker has of this is seeing Batman jump out a window to save her (which he would have done for any person Joker flung out of there), 4. there still being enough time to reach either of the hostages when Joker doesn't have a clock in his cell or on his person, 5. no police being out on patrol close enough to the spots where the hostages are, 6. Batman getting to his hostage first before the police, even though he's using a new vehicle Joker has never seen until this night. And that's just one scheme out of a dozen of his. Actually subverted, though, since Joker is clearly an [[GambitSpeedChess opportunist]] who simply accommodates whenever his plans fail.

to:

* The aggregate actions of the Joker in ''Film/TheDarkKnight'': for an agent of chaos with a stated disdain for [[TheChessmaster Chessmasters]], he effortlessly pulls together seemingly random and improbable events into a single overall scheme. A good example is his "race for two hostages scheme", which counts on 1. Joker being captured and taking to a holding cell both just close enough yet far enough from the spot of his scheme, 2. Batman being present at the jail to interrogate him, 3. Batman being in love with Rachel Dawes even though the only proof Joker has of this is seeing Batman jump out a window to save her (which he would have done for any person Joker flung out of there), 4. there still being enough time to reach either of the hostages when Joker doesn't have a clock in his cell or on his person, 5. no police being out on patrol close enough to the spots where the hostages are, 6. Batman getting to his hostage first before the police, even though he's using a new vehicle Joker has never seen until this night. And that's just one scheme out of a dozen of his. Actually subverted, though, since Joker is clearly an [[GambitSpeedChess opportunist]] who simply accommodates whenever his plans fail.
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