History Main / FriendsRentControl

15th Oct '17 9:29:07 PM JadeEyes1
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* ''Literature/SafeHaven'': The heroine is able to afford a bus ticket, then able to rent and fix up a cottage, despite impulsively fleeing her abusive husband and only finding work as a waitress. Especially glaring as it's ''completely'' the opposite of what happens in the book--it takes an entire year for her to save the money and she has to barely eat and stay in cheap motels in order to get by.
* In ''Film/YouveGotMail'', Kathleen Kelly lives in a spacious, pre-war brownstone in the Upper West Side on the earnings from a small children's bookstore. ''Slightly'' more plausible at the start of the film, when her business is doing well and she shares the apartment with her live-in boyfriend (who's a rather successful journalist). When business at the bookstore begins to suffer, however, her lifestyle doesn't seem to be affected at all (aside from one occasion where she doesn't have enough cash to cover her purchases at a food market); she even continues living in her spacious quarters after her boyfriend moves out -- and, more unbelievably, after ''her business goes under''.

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* ''Literature/SafeHaven'': The heroine is able to afford a bus ticket, then able to rent and fix up a cottage, despite impulsively fleeing her abusive husband and only finding work as a waitress. Especially glaring as it's ''completely'' the opposite of what happens in the book--it book: it takes an entire year for her to save the money money, and she has to barely eat and stay in cheap motels in order to get by.
* In ''Film/YouveGotMail'', Kathleen Kelly lives in a spacious, pre-war beautiful, spacious prewar brownstone in the Upper West Side on the earnings from a small children's bookstore. ''Slightly'' It's ''slightly'' more plausible at the start of the film, when her business is doing well (her merchandise is rather high-priced) and she shares the apartment with her live-in boyfriend (who's boyfriend, who's a rather successful journalist). journalist. (It's also hinted that most of the furnishings were inherited from her mother, who may have owned the place before her.) When her business at the bookstore begins to suffer, however, her lifestyle doesn't seem to be affected at all (aside from one occasion scene where she doesn't have enough cash to cover her purchases at a food market); market). Moreover, she even continues living in her spacious quarters after her boyfriend moves out -- and, more unbelievably, after ''her business goes under''.



** Monk himself is downplayed or an odd variant of this trope. For a private investigator and consultant to the San Francisco Police Department, his apartment (1 bed, 2 bath, kitchen, dining and living rooms) is very nice for notoriously expensive San Francisco (AKA home to some of the highest rent prices on the West Coast). While Monk's personal expenses are somewhat reduced since he doesn't own or drive a car, rarely travels, does not own any high-end electronics, and his iconic LimitedWardrobe, etc.) his OCD brings about a number of other expenses many people don't have (frequent psychiatrist sessions with Dr. Kroger or Dr. Bell, a personal assistant, etc.) and others most people would find unnecessary (he only uses an umbrella only once, runs his dishwasher and washing machine too often, etc.)

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** Monk himself is downplayed or an odd variant of this trope. For a private investigator and consultant to the San Francisco Police Department, his apartment (1 bed, 2 bath, kitchen, dining and living rooms) is very nice for notoriously expensive San Francisco (AKA home to some of the highest rent prices on the West Coast). While Monk's personal expenses are somewhat reduced since he (he doesn't own or drive a car, rarely travels, does not own any high-end electronics, and his has an iconic LimitedWardrobe, etc.) his OCD brings about a number of other expenses many people don't have (frequent psychiatrist sessions with Dr. Kroger or Dr. Bell, a personal assistant, etc.) and others most people would find unnecessary (he only uses an umbrella only once, runs his dishwasher and washing machine too often, etc.)).
6th Oct '17 1:46:19 PM rigpig
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* the Hugh Grant character in ''Film/NottingHill'' works in a small bookshop but lives in a large house, in an expensive area of London, shared with an apparently unemployed room-mate
** later averted in ''Film/AboutABoy'' in which the Hugh Grant character apparently has a large, unearned income from royalties on a song he once wrote


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* the Gifford family in ''Series/ColdFeet'' live in a large, well-appointed (if slightly run-down) house in London which they apparently own, despite their low income.
** averted to varying extents by the other characters, whose vaguely defined careers are implied to be well-paid.
30th Sep '17 7:35:29 PM thatother1dude
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** Furthermore, the house isn't exactly that good, as it has pretty thin walls among other problems.

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** Furthermore, the house isn't is large [[TheAllegedHouse but not exactly that good, good]], as it has pretty thin walls among other problems.
21st Sep '17 11:51:06 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/GoodGame'': In the first episode, the two main characters live in a large, well-furnished house in Southern California despite apparently having no job between the two of them. Their landlord tries to evict them in the same episode, saying that they're six months late on their rent, but how they got the house to begin with is still suspect.



* ''WebVideo/GoodGame'': In the first episode, the two main characters live in a large, well-furnished house in Southern California despite apparently having no job between the two of them. Their landlord tries to evict them in the same episode, saying that they're six months late on their rent, but how they got the house to begin with is still suspect.



** Flanders has a very nice house with a very spacious and lavish rumpus room in the basement, but in an early episode is stated to only make $27 a week more than Homer does before going into business for himself.
*** Flanders also admitted to buying his RV on credit; for all we know the house is mortgaged to the hilt too.

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** Flanders has a very nice house with a very spacious and lavish rumpus room in the basement, but in an early episode is stated to only make $27 a week more than Homer does before going into business for himself. \n*** Flanders also admitted to buying his RV on credit; for all we know the house is mortgaged to the hilt too.
21st Sep '17 11:26:23 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** The apartment where Ted, Marshall, and Lily live has an abnormally large main room but is otherwise not that big. Both the kitchen and the bedrooms are fairly small (Ted's drafting table is in the main room cause it won't fit anywhere else) and it's implied the building itself isn't that great. Ted has always been employed as an architect and Marshall lives off his student loans. Averted when Lily moves out and ends up living in a one room apartment so small that its Murphy bed can't even come down all the way.
*** Lampshaded by Ted in season four: "I thought having a rent-controlled apartment on the Upper West Side was half the reason she agreed to marry me."

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** The apartment where Ted, Marshall, and Lily live has an abnormally large main room but is otherwise not that big. Both the kitchen and the bedrooms are fairly small (Ted's drafting table is in the main room cause it won't fit anywhere else) and it's implied the building itself isn't that great. Ted has always been employed as an architect and Marshall lives off his student loans. Averted when Lily moves out and ends up living in a one room apartment so small that its Murphy bed can't even come down all the way.
***
way. Lampshaded by Ted in season four: "I thought having a rent-controlled apartment on the Upper West Side was half the reason she agreed to marry me."



* Speaking specifically of rent control, during the first season of ''Series/{{Angel}}'', Cordelia finds herself a sweet, roomy apartment that she can afford on a receptionist's salary. [[spoiler:It's haunted. One of the ghosts tries to kill her, but the other is nice and is thus not exorcised. Phantom Dennis is referenced occasionally in future seasons.]]

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* Speaking specifically of rent control, during ''Series/{{Angel}}'',
** During
the first season of ''Series/{{Angel}}'', season, Cordelia finds herself a sweet, roomy apartment that she can afford on a receptionist's salary. [[spoiler:It's haunted. One of the ghosts tries to kill her, but the other is nice and is thus not exorcised. Phantom Dennis is referenced occasionally in future seasons.]]



* In ''Series/GreysAnatomy'', medical intern Meredith lives in her mother's house (while her mother is in a nursing home and later dies), so she doesn't have to pay. George and Izzie, and eventually Alex, are invited to stay with her. Christina is the only intern with her own apartment, but later lives with her boyfriend who is an attending, and then with Callie who is a resident then becomes an attending. Callie was supported by her wealthy family and temporarily lived in a hotel room with George. When Izzie and Alex marry, Derek gives them his trailer. The later seasons have April, Jackson, Alex, and Lexi living at Meredith's house while Meredith moves in with Derek. It's never stated how many rooms she has, but one person was in the attic or basement. Meredith recently sold her mother's house to Alex, who is renting a room to Christina.
** Meredith would still have to pay property taxes on the house.
** Derek's salary is mentioned at one point to be $2 million a year. Justified in that he's a top neurosurgeon. Why does he live in a trailer? Because he wants to, and he hasn't yet figured out what to do with the large piece of land he bought. Back in New York, him and Addison had a very nice brownstone. They also had a house in the Hamptons. With his salary, and with Addison being a well-known surgeon in her own right, them being able to afford all that is justified. After the divorce, Derek simply gives Addison both East Coast places.



* Justified with Series/{{Sherlock}} and John's flat on Baker Street, as Sherlock has helped the landlady Mrs. Hudson (by ensuring her runaway husband would be executed in the US), so she gives him a discount (unspecified, of course). On the other hand, Sherlock makes no money off his police work and frequently refuses compensation from private clients (John usually steps in and takes the money). John was only shown working once by getting a job as a local doctor... only to fall asleep in the office due to long nights investigating. He does receive pension after being discharged from the army but claims in the pilot that it's not nearly enough to afford a place in London. Also, in the pilot, Mycroft offers to pay John to spy on Sherlock (John didn't know who Mycroft was at the time). When Sherlock finds out, he berates John for refusing and later explains that Mycroft's concern was that of a brother, not an enemy.
** Mrs. Hudson can afford to live in a townhouse in an expensive London neighborhood because her late husband run a drug cartel and she inherited a sizeable fortune when he was executed.

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* Justified with Series/{{Sherlock}} and John's flat on Baker Street, as Sherlock has helped the landlady Mrs. Hudson (by ensuring her runaway husband would be executed in the US), so she gives him a discount (unspecified, of course). On the other hand, Sherlock makes no money off his police work and frequently refuses compensation from private clients (John usually steps in and takes the money). John was only shown working once by getting a job as a local doctor... only to fall asleep in the office due to long nights investigating. He does receive pension after being discharged from the army but claims in the pilot that it's not nearly enough to afford a place in London. Also, in the pilot, Mycroft offers to pay John to spy on Sherlock (John didn't know who Mycroft was at the time). When Sherlock finds out, he berates John for refusing and later explains that Mycroft's concern was that of a brother, not an enemy.
**
enemy. Mrs. Hudson can afford to live in a townhouse in an expensive London neighborhood because her late husband run a drug cartel and she inherited a sizeable fortune when he was executed.



* While it (sort of) makes sense for most of the cast of ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' to have nice apartments, as Leonard, Sheldon, Raj, Bernadette and Amy are all scientists with fairly large research grants ([[BasementDweller and Howard lives with his mother]]), Penny's nice apartment filled with clothes, accessories, shoes and booze seems like an awful lot for a waitress's budget. [[PrettyFreeloaders Maybe she just never buys food]]. In one of the early episodes, Leonard mentions covering Penny's rent for her.
** It seems like the viewer is meant to feel that Penny's apartment is cramped because it's visibly smaller than Leonard and Sheldon's, with "only" one bedroom and a bathroom that can only be accessed by walking through said bedroom (meaning that non-romantic overnight guests always generate extra drama). Additionally, Penny's bedroom door is usually left open to create more of a "studio" feel, but despite being crammed with furniture and junk it's still pretty obviously a biggish place for a "broke" part-time waitress to be renting alone.
** Leonard and Sheldon are even on the verge of ''inverting'' this trope, given Pasadena property values and the fact that they seem to be fairly high-ranking researchers (they have their own offices and research topics) at [=CalTech=]. They probably should be able to afford their own apartments instead of sharing.
*** It's pretty clear from early on that, despite his protestations to the contrary, Sheldon (who let's not forget is so well-paid he doesn't even ''cash his paychecks'' regularly unless he specifically wants to buy something) could always have afforded the place on his own and genuinely wanted a roommate for the company, whether he admits it or not. Leonard for his part remains out of friendship, StockholmSyndrome and what money he saves goes to either helping Penny with rent/food (in early seasons) or buying whatever new nerd merch he wants.
** This becomes even stranger in Season 7-8. When Howard and Bernadette get married, there's a lot of conflict about her making more money than he does. He moves into her apartment, which is a moderate one-bedroom and they argue about his spending habits. Penny, by contrast, starts a good job with Bernadette's company and late in the season states that she's now making more money than Leonard. Perhaps it's best [[MST3KMantra we don't analyze the show too much]].
*** Bernadette comes from traditional working dad/stay-at-home mom family, where her father was a cop until retirement, so her views on luxurious spending don't include Howard's need to buy into a five grand 3D printer just because he can; anything over $500 probably makes her step back to evaluate. Penny most likely has massive debt to pay off, but also is able to stay just a hallway across from her boyfriend/husband, and not moving or upgrading allows her to continue to feed her clothing/shoe habit (and given what she was spending on shoes 'before' her new job, that's probably a lot).
** Raj came from extremely wealthy parents (quoted from Sheldon as being somewhere "between Bruce Wayne and Scrooge [=McDuck=]"), so his fairly large one bedroom is actually extremely below his means. His only real concerns towards his dwelling is maintaining his residency in the US and playing his parents against one another for gifts when they divorce.



** Earl is also technically homeless, since he lives in a room at a motel. (Which is lampshaded when he goes to apply for a credit card.) Why he doesn't use even some of his lottery winnings to get a cheap apartment is unknown. [[spoiler: He does get himself an apartment, but it seems he used the money he earned from his first "real" job at Wadt Appliances.]] Although most of that money goes towards his Karma cause, he is shown to use it to buy things for himself, such as a car alarm.
** It's possible Joy collected welfare. She'd be entitled to assistance and probably food stamps with two little kids.
* On ''Series/{{Glee}}'', some viewers have wondered how Marley's mom can afford a two-story house when their poverty is often a plot point. However, the house could be a rental, and renting in semi-rural Ohio would cost a fraction of New York's prices.

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* ''Series/{{Glee}}''
** Earl is also technically homeless, since he lives in a room at a motel. (Which is lampshaded when he goes to apply for a credit card.) Why he doesn't use even some of his lottery winnings to get a cheap apartment is unknown. [[spoiler: He does get himself an apartment, but it seems he used the money he earned from his first "real" job at Wadt Appliances.]] Although most of that money goes towards his Karma cause, he is shown to use it to buy things for himself, such as a car alarm.
** It's possible Joy collected welfare. She'd be entitled to assistance and probably food stamps with two little kids.
* On ''Series/{{Glee}}'', some
Some viewers have wondered how Marley's mom can afford a two-story house when their poverty is often a plot point. However, the house could be a rental, and renting in semi-rural Ohio would cost a fraction of New York's prices.



* Averted with the PoorlyDisguisedPilot episode of ''Series/TheFactsOfLife'', "Big Apple Blues." Five young people share a loft in New York City, and when one leaves they worry about how to come up with an extra $200 (each? It's not clear). In 1988 a loft for $1000 was a little far-fetched, but not out of the realm of reality. It's probably a little bigger than a realistic NYC apartment might be, but that's forgivable.



* ''Series/LastManStanding'': Averted by virtue of being set in Denver (lower cost of living), with both Mike and Vanessa working fairly lucrative jobs (Mike is the marketing director of a national chain of sporting goods stores and Vanessa is a scientist at a prestigious energy company). Their neighborhood is shown to also be rather nice, making this one of the few sitcoms to really focus on upper-middle class people.


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* ''Series/GoodGame'': In the first episode, the two main characters live in a large, well-furnished house in Southern California despite apparently having no job between the two of them. Their landlord tries to evict them in the same episode, saying that they're six months late on their rent, but how they got the house to begin with is still suspect.
19th Sep '17 5:39:41 PM tyrekecorrea
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* Inverted in ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', where the twins and their mother occupy a dwelling that looks more like an incredibly-cramped one bedroom apartment than a suite in a five-star hotel.

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* Inverted Played with in ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', where the ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody''. The twins and their mother occupy a dwelling that looks more like an incredibly-cramped one bedroom apartment than a suite in a five-star hotel.hotel. In the first episode, though, Carey says that he and Mr. Moesby worked out a deal where she gets free room and board.
17th Sep '17 3:03:48 PM dmcreif
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** Matt Murdock lives in a pretty large apartment in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, which has some of the highest rent prices in the United States. As a recent law school graduate who's only just starting his own practice, this place should be well outside Matt's budget. But, it's mentioned in the first episode that Hell's Kitchen saw property values drop due to damage sustained during "The [[Film/TheAvengers2012 Incident]]". Making Matt's apartment even cheaper is its generally run-down aesthetic (though all the appliances seem to function just fine), and the bright electronic billboard across the street that shines brightly through the living room window - an eyesore for anyone with functioning eyes, but not a problem for a blind man.

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** Matt Murdock lives in a pretty large apartment in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, which has some of the highest rent prices in the United States. As a recent law school graduate who's only just starting his own practice, this place should be well outside Matt's budget. But, it's mentioned in the first episode that Hell's Kitchen saw property values drop due to damage sustained during "The [[Film/TheAvengers2012 Incident]]". Making Matt's apartment even cheaper is its generally run-down aesthetic (though all (hell, the appliances seem to function just fine), minibar is made of unfinished plywood), and the bright electronic billboard across the street that shines brightly through the living room window - an eyesore for anyone with functioning eyes, but not a problem for a blind man.



** Matt's living situation gets lampshaded in ''Series/TheDefenders2017'' when {{Jessica Jones}} accompanies Matt back to his apartment and asks Matt, "So you wanna tell me how a pro bono lawyer can afford a loft like this in New York City?" Matt responds by telling her about the billboard, and confesses that he sometimes helps his landlord with tenants that are late with their rent.

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** Matt's living situation gets lampshaded a bit more complicated in ''Series/TheDefenders2017'' when {{Jessica Jones}} accompanies Matt back to his ''Series/TheDefenders2017'', since he's still living out of the apartment but is now an independent ''pro bono'' attorney, and probably earns less than he earned at Nelson & Murdock. While it's never said out loud, it is heavily implied that Matt received a large inheritance from Elektra upon her death at the end of season 2. Lampshaded in "Ashes, Ashes" when Matt and Series/JessicaJones2015 drop by the apartment so Matt can change into civilian clothes before they go to interview John Raymond's daughter, and Jessica asks Matt, "So you wanna tell me how a pro bono lawyer can afford a loft like this in New York City?" Matt responds by telling her about the billboard, and confesses jokes that he sometimes helps his landlord with tenants that are late with their rent.
17th Sep '17 12:47:15 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* The Humphreys on ''Series/GossipGirl'' keep griping about how they are poor (at least in comparison to the rest of the cast) and how times are rough, which makes sense given that Rufus is the sole breadmaker and he owns a low key art gallery. Their loft, however, suggests that they are considerably more wealthy than Rufus' job would make them, and that they are far from as poor as they keep saying that they are.
** Television Without Pity also pointed out the ludicrous treatment of dorm rooms in the later seasons; Blair's dorm room at NYU is approximately the size of at least two actual dorm rooms, so unless she also bought the room next to hers and knocked down the adjoining wall, there's no explanation for how absurdly spacious her room is.

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* ''Series/GossipGirl''
**
The Humphreys on ''Series/GossipGirl'' keep griping about how they are poor (at least in comparison to the rest of the cast) and how times are rough, which makes sense given that Rufus is the sole breadmaker and he owns a low key art gallery. Their loft, however, suggests that they are considerably more wealthy than Rufus' job would make them, and that they are far from as poor as they keep saying that they are.
** Television Without Pity also pointed out the ludicrous treatment of dorm rooms in the later seasons; Blair's dorm room at NYU is approximately the size of at least two actual dorm rooms, so unless she also bought the room next to hers and knocked down the adjoining wall, there's no explanation for how absurdly spacious her room is.



* It would probably be easier to list the German TV shows where this ''isn't'' the case. Apparently, even struggling freelancers and single mothers can afford six-room-apartments in renovated old buildings. Changed only in recent years in that nowadays, they often live in ex-factory lofts instead (which tend to be even bigger). Yes, in former UsefulNotes/EastGermany rents are lower, but not that low.



* Justified on ''Series/BurnNotice''. Thanks to the titular notice, Michael Westen has no job history, no credit, no bank accounts, and a decidedly irregular income. But he lives in a very large multi-level apartment in Miami, overlooking a river, that only costs him $200 a month. But it's explained in the pilot episode the apartment is actually a converted storage space above a nightclub that is not technically zoned as an apartment. Westen had to agree he was a squatter should the authorities question him and he doesn't mind the noise level because he's slept through worse over the years. Just about anyone else would. The pilot episode shows the loft in its bare-bones condition, and over the course of the first season makes some changes so that it looks halfway livable, with a fridge, kitchen counter, furniture...

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* ''Series/BurnNotice''.
**
Justified on ''Series/BurnNotice''. Thanks thanks to the titular notice, Michael Westen has no job history, no credit, no bank accounts, and a decidedly irregular income. But he lives in a very large multi-level apartment in Miami, overlooking a river, that only costs him $200 a month. But it's explained in the pilot episode the apartment is actually a converted storage space above a nightclub that is not technically zoned as an apartment. Westen had to agree he was a squatter should the authorities question him and he doesn't mind the noise level because he's slept through worse over the years. Just about anyone else would. The pilot episode shows the loft in its bare-bones condition, and over the course of the first season makes some changes so that it looks halfway livable, with a fridge, kitchen counter, furniture...



*** Of course, one can take into account that the trope was probably averted at one point as Monk did move into this apartment before Trudy's death. At the time, Trudy worked as a newspaper journalist, Adrian was a full-fledged homicide inspector, and Trudy was enough of an influence that Adrian didn't do such things like frequent use of his washing machines.



** Done in ''Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants'', where a murder victim is a shoe salesman who lives in a converted loft apartment (also pretty expensive real estate). It's lampshaded as the characters wonder how a lowly shoe salesman is able to afford such a place.

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** Done in ''Mr. "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants'', Assistants," where a murder victim is a shoe salesman who lives in a converted loft apartment (also pretty expensive real estate). It's lampshaded as the characters wonder how a lowly shoe salesman is able to afford such a place.



** Averted when Marnie moves into her own, ''tiny'', studio apartment so small that the shower is located in the combination living room-kitchen.



* Over the series in ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' Jessica Fletcher is able to afford not only a two bedroom house in Cabot Cove Maine, but a one bedroom Manhattan apartment, and regular trips to international ports of call, all on a retired school teacher pension, her husband's life insurance, and book sales.
** Considering how many books she's written, it's not that implausible. Plus, she and her husband probably purchased the house at a time it was cheap and she may have used his insurance to pay off the mortgage. And she's getting her pension ''and'' his.
* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Series/BrooklynNineNine'': in Season 1, Jake lives in a large, pleasant apartment despite being ''terrible'' with money (to the point where he's implied to have declared bankruptcy at least once) - it's quickly explained that it was his grandmother's apartment, and that he still benefits from the rent control she negotiated decades earlier (Jake and Gina both refer to having spent time in the apartment during childhood; they're now in their early thirties). Furthermore, almost as soon as the apartment appears on-screen it's revealed that he's about to lose it because the building is about to become a co-op and he can't afford to purchase the place. In the end, Gina puts a down payment on the apartment for herself, but this time it's {{justified|Trope}} by the fact that she's been renting the same one-room studio for over ten years and saving up until a nicer place came along.

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* Over the series in ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' Jessica Fletcher is able to afford not only a two bedroom house in Cabot Cove Maine, but a one bedroom Manhattan apartment, and regular trips to international ports of call, all on a retired school teacher pension, her husband's life insurance, and book sales.
''Series/BrooklynNineNine'':
** Considering how many books she's written, it's not that implausible. Plus, she and her husband probably purchased the house at a time it was cheap and she may have used his insurance to pay off the mortgage. And she's getting her pension ''and'' his.
*
{{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Series/BrooklynNineNine'': in Season 1, Jake lives in a large, pleasant apartment despite being ''terrible'' with money (to the point where he's implied to have declared bankruptcy at least once) - it's quickly explained that it was his grandmother's apartment, and that he still benefits from the rent control she negotiated decades earlier (Jake and Gina both refer to having spent time in the apartment during childhood; they're now in their early thirties). Furthermore, almost as soon as the apartment appears on-screen it's revealed that he's about to lose it because the building is about to become a co-op and he can't afford to purchase the place. In the end, Gina puts a down payment on the apartment for herself, but this time it's {{justified|Trope}} by the fact that she's been renting the same one-room studio for over ten years and saving up until a nicer place came along.



* In "Just the Ten of Us", the Lubbocks live in a house in Eureka, California that's big enough to comfortably house ten people. The parents are a Catholic school coach and a homemaker. Especially bad as a running theme is that the family is struggling financially.
** It's indicated that the school provided the family with the house. And even if not, it's also implied that it isn't the nicest of places--the four oldest sisters share an attic bedroom, son JR shares with his baby brother, youngest daughter Sherry shares with her baby sister.
* Tony [=DiNozzo=] of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' lives in a very nice apartment for a guy living on a cop's salary. Late in season 13 [=McGee=] does some digging and learns that not only does Tony own the apartment outright but he bought it back when he was still a probationary agent and thus was not making much money. It turns out that Tony paid well below market price for the apartment since it was once the site of a gruesome triple homicide, after which nobody wanted to live there anymore. Tony was able to get the place cheap and put a grand piano on top of a large bloodstain that couldn't be completely cleaned. Tim then informs Tony that if Tony wanted to sell the apartment, enough time has passed since the murders that he is no longer legally required to inform potential buyers of its sordid history and thus could get full market value for it. In the following season, a subplot of one episode is the team quarreling over who gets to lease that apartment from Tony's dad after Tony leaves the team and the country. [[spoiler: Tim ends up with it, partially because he and his fiancee Deliah need the extra space.]]
** A season later, new agent Nick Torres laments that back when he did undercover work in South America, he could get a gorgeous apartment for $400 US a month. The cost of living in the DC Metro area is ''much'' higher.

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* In "Just ''Just the Ten of Us", Us'', the Lubbocks live in a house in Eureka, California that's big enough to comfortably house ten people. The parents are a Catholic school coach and a homemaker. Especially bad as a running theme is that the family is struggling financially.
**
financially. It's indicated that the school provided the family with the house. And even if not, it's also implied that it isn't the nicest of places--the four oldest sisters share an attic bedroom, son JR shares with his baby brother, youngest daughter Sherry shares with her baby sister.
* Tony [=DiNozzo=] of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' lives in a very nice apartment for a guy living on a cop's salary. Late in season 13 [=McGee=] does some digging and learns that not only does Tony own the apartment outright but he bought it back when he was still a probationary agent and thus was not making much money. It turns out that Tony paid well below market price for the apartment since it was once the site of a gruesome triple homicide, after which nobody wanted to live there anymore. Tony was able to get the place cheap and put a grand piano on top of a large bloodstain that couldn't be completely cleaned. Tim then informs Tony that if Tony wanted to sell the apartment, enough time has passed since the murders that he is no longer legally required to inform potential buyers of its sordid history and thus could get full market value for it. In the following season, a subplot of one episode is the team quarreling over who gets to lease that apartment from Tony's dad after Tony leaves the team and the country. [[spoiler: Tim ends up with it, partially because he and his fiancee Deliah need the extra space.]]
**
]] A season later, new agent Nick Torres laments that back when he did undercover work in South America, he could get a gorgeous apartment for $400 US a month. The cost of living in the DC Metro area is ''much'' higher.



* Averted and lampshaded in ''Series/HotInCleveland''. One of the main reasons for the cast to relocate from LA to Cleveland in the pilot was that the cost of living was so much lower.
17th Sep '17 12:38:24 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* In ''Series/{{Spaced}}'', trying to avert this sets up the entire series - Tim and Daisy have to pose as a couple in order to afford a flat. It's still a ''very'' nice flat for £90 a week, but then again the landlord is pretty desperate for company.
17th Sep '17 12:35:42 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren''. [[JadedWashout Al Bundy]] made minimum wage and was the only working member of the family, yet they lived in a two-story house with a large basement in what appears to be in a fairly nice neighborhood in Chicago. It's also clean and tastefully decorated, making it a stretch for us to believe [[LivingInAFurnitureStore that the place is a dump]]. This being said, their neighbors tended to be obscenely rich.

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* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren''. [[JadedWashout Al Bundy]] made minimum wage and was the only working member of the family, yet they lived in a two-story house with a large basement in what appears to be in a fairly nice neighborhood in Chicago.that's nice enough to have a pair of upper-middle class bankers as their next-door neighbors. It's also clean and tastefully decorated, making it a stretch for us to believe [[LivingInAFurnitureStore that the place is a dump]]. This being said, their neighbors tended to be obscenely rich.
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