History Main / FriendsRentControl

26th Apr '17 10:20:31 PM DarkMask
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* ''Series/FullHouse'': Some found it unrealistic that Danny could have afforded what was obviously a very nice, very big town house in a presumably equally very nice section of San Francisco on a TV morning show host's salary, as well as support three young children. There's never any mention of Joey or Jesse paying him rent (not that they could have, given how sporadic their employment was for the first few seasons of the show).

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* ''Series/FullHouse'': Some found it unrealistic that Danny could have afforded what was obviously a very nice, very big town house (5-bedrooms, with a spacious attic, huge basement, and attached garage) in a presumably equally very nice section of San Francisco on a TV morning show host's salary, as well as support three young children. There's never any mention of Joey or Jesse paying him rent (not that they could have, given how sporadic their employment was for the first few seasons of the show).
24th Apr '17 5:21:33 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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--->''' '90s Kid''': Oh, that's probably my land lord with another eviction note… '''*Crashing sound*''' And a battering ram… '''*DramaticGunCock*''' And a sawed-off shotgun… Gotta go! ''(runs away as shots are fired in the background)''

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--->''' '90s --->''''90s Kid''': Oh, that's it's probably just my land lord landlord with another eviction note… note... '''*Crashing sound*''' And a battering ram… ram... '''*DramaticGunCock*''' And a sawed-off shotgun… shotgun... Gotta go! ''(runs away as shots are fired in the background)''
11th Apr '17 11:37:32 PM LBHills
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** In the episode "Peel of Fortune," Daffy bought the house (based on royalties from an automatic carrot peeler he stole from Bugs) and lets Bugs live with him. However, Daffy's demands causes Bugs to lose it and he storms out. He is forced to move back into his old rabbit hole from the classic ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' cartoons. He finds the experience unpleasant, after years of suburban lifestyle. [[StatusQuoIsGod Status Quo is restored]] when the automatic peeler is recalled due to Daffy not fully building the thing right and Bugs having to save the day.

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** In the episode "Peel of Fortune," Daffy bought the house (based on royalties from an automatic carrot peeler he stole from Bugs) and lets Bugs live with him. However, Daffy's demands causes Bugs to lose it and he storms out. He is forced to move back into his old rabbit hole from the classic ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' cartoons. He finds the experience unpleasant, after years of suburban lifestyle. [[StatusQuoIsGod Status Quo is restored]] when the automatic peeler is recalled due to schematic Daffy not fully building the thing right stole and Bugs having mass-produced turns out to save the day.have an irreparable defect: overnight, Daffy's once again a freeloader and Bugs' manual-carrot-peeler royalties are rolling in again.
4th Apr '17 6:14:53 PM Gamermaster
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Added DiffLines:

* Kobayashi from ''Manga/MissKobayashisDragonMaid'' is the sole source of income in her household, yet she somehow makes enough money to afford a decent sized apartment and support two ([[spoiler:later three]]) dragons, one of whom ''literally'' eats electricity.
4th Apr '17 9:45:55 AM jharrison3051
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* Carrie from ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' is an interesting example, as this depends on whether the episode in question [[DependingOnTheWriter depicts her as a nationwide sensation like the real Candace Bushnell or as another workaday columnist.]] If the latter is true, then it's unknown how she can afford her nice apartment and her extensive collection of shoes. One episode {{lampshade|Hanging}}d the trope. Carrie remarks to her screenwriter boyfriend-of-the-season that his TV script about a bunch of young actors living in a Manhattan penthouse is hardly realistic. Another episode reveals her apartment was rent controlled. When Aidan buys her building and gives her the option of either buying the apartment or leaving, she starts to look at more believably-priced buildings (including one which apparently reeks because it's right above an Indian restaurant.) Apparently, she got the apartment and the rental value just exploded around her. The exterior of her apartment, actually a five bedroom townhouse, sold for $13.2 million in 2013.

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* Carrie from ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' is an interesting example, as this depends on whether the episode in question [[DependingOnTheWriter depicts her as a nationwide sensation like the real Candace Bushnell or as another workaday columnist.]] If the latter is true, then it's unknown how she can afford her nice apartment and her extensive collection of shoes. One episode revealed that her rent is only $750 a month, though at the time she only had $1,600 in her bank account. One episode {{lampshade|Hanging}}d the trope. Carrie remarks to her screenwriter boyfriend-of-the-season that his TV script about a bunch of young actors living in a Manhattan penthouse is hardly realistic. Another episode reveals her apartment was rent controlled. When Aidan buys her building and gives her the option of either buying the apartment or leaving, she starts to look at more believably-priced buildings (including one which apparently reeks because it's right above an Indian restaurant.) Apparently, she got the apartment and the rental value just exploded around her. The exterior of her apartment, actually a five bedroom townhouse, sold for $13.2 million in 2013.
1st Apr '17 9:12:34 AM dmcreif
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* Justified on ''Series/{{Daredevil 2015}}''. Matt Murdock lives in a pretty large apartment in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, which has some of the highest rent prices in the United States. As a recent law school graduate who's only just starting his own practice, this place should be well outside Matt's budget. But, Hell's Kitchen saw property values drop due to damage sustained during The [[Film/TheAvengers2012 Incident]]. Making Matt's apartment even cheaper is its generally run-down aesthetic (though all the appliances seem to function just fine), and the bright electronic billboard across the street that shines brightly through the living room window - an eyesore for anyone with functioning eyes, but not a problem for a blind man. He also doesn't use the lights all that often (lower electric bill), doesn't have any wall decorations or TV, and as a disabled individual qualifies for a number of tax breaks.

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* Justified on ''Series/{{Daredevil 2015}}''. Matt 2015}}'':
**Matt
Murdock lives in a pretty large apartment in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, which has some of the highest rent prices in the United States. As a recent law school graduate who's only just starting his own practice, this place should be well outside Matt's budget. But, Hell's Kitchen saw property values drop due to damage sustained during The "The [[Film/TheAvengers2012 Incident]].Incident]]". Making Matt's apartment even cheaper is its generally run-down aesthetic (though all the appliances seem to function just fine), and the bright electronic billboard across the street that shines brightly through the living room window - an eyesore for anyone with functioning eyes, but not a problem for a blind man. He also doesn't use the lights all that often (lower (lowering the electric bill), doesn't have any wall decorations or TV, and as a disabled individual qualifies for a number of tax breaks. breaks.
**Karen Page also averts it. To show that she actually makes less money working at Nelson & Murdock than she did at her Union Allied job, she's shown as having had to move to a somewhat cheaper apartment in between season 1 and 2.
27th Mar '17 2:51:51 PM Jhonny
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** Played straight with Phoebe, whose apartment was larger and nicer than Joey and Chandler's. Justified in early seasons as she was sharing it with her grandmother but is later living alone on a massuse's salary.

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** Played straight with Phoebe, whose apartment was larger and nicer than Joey and Chandler's. Justified in early seasons as she was sharing it with her grandmother but is later living alone on a massuse's masseuse's salary.
25th Mar '17 2:34:02 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'', the {{Trope Namer|s}}. {{Handwave}}d by Monica claiming that her grandmother originally rented the apartment and she is illegally subletting it, which is actually in the realm of possibility due to rent control in Manhattan. The superintendent is actually aware that Monica is breaking the law, and one episode centered on Joey trying to persuade him not to blow the whistle after his patience runs out. That being said, there was a chunk of time where Monica was unemployed, meaning the entire apartment's rent fell to the wages of a waitress. A particularly terrible, and therefore probably poorly-tipped, waitress. (Though in fairness, Monica borrows money from Ross and makes several references to her savings being quickly depleted, so clearly she was still paying some rent.)
** Chandler and Joey's apartment directly across the hall is an aversion, as Chandler has what is implied to be a high-paying white collar job which would allow him to support both himself and the frequently unemployed Joey, and yet their apartment is roughly a quarter the size of Monica's and is sparsely furnished. By the end of the series, most of the characters ended up with jobs that would have allowed them to afford the apartments outright.
** This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by Chandler in the GrandFinale, by telling his newborn children of the apartment: "because of rent control, it was a friggin' steal."
** Played straight with Phoebe though, whose apartment was larger and nicer than Joey and Chandler's. Justified in early seasons as she was sharing it with her grandmother but is later living alone on a massuse's salary.

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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'', the {{Trope Namer|s}}.
**
{{Handwave}}d by Monica claiming that her grandmother originally rented the apartment and she is illegally subletting it, which is actually in the realm of possibility due to rent control in Manhattan. The superintendent is actually aware that Monica is breaking the law, and one episode centered on Joey trying to persuade him not to blow the whistle after his patience runs out. That being said, there was a chunk of time where Monica was unemployed, meaning the entire apartment's rent fell to the wages of a waitress. A particularly terrible, and therefore probably poorly-tipped, waitress. (Though in fairness, Monica borrows money from Ross and makes several references to her savings being quickly depleted, so clearly she was still paying some rent.)
** Chandler and Joey's apartment directly across the hall is an aversion, as Chandler has what is implied to be a high-paying white collar job which would allow him to support both himself and the frequently unemployed Joey, and yet their apartment is roughly a quarter the size of Monica's and is sparsely furnished. By the end of the series, most of the characters ended up with jobs that would have allowed them to afford the apartments outright.
**
This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by Chandler in the GrandFinale, by telling his newborn children of the apartment: "because of rent control, it was a friggin' steal."
** Played straight with Phoebe though, Phoebe, whose apartment was larger and nicer than Joey and Chandler's. Justified in early seasons as she was sharing it with her grandmother but is later living alone on a massuse's salary.



** Rent control aside, as the years wore on, there were a few hints thrown in that the building wasn't the nicest in the world. There were the thin floors that let Mr. Heckles constantly hear their footsteps and the crummy wiring that made a switch in Chandler and Joey's apartment turn on Monica's TV.



* Carrie from ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' is an interesting example, as this depends on whether the episode in question [[DependingOnTheWriter depicts her as a nationwide sensation like the real Candace Bushnell or as another workaday columnist.]] If the latter is true, then it's unknown how she can afford her nice apartment and her extensive collection of shoes.
** One episode {{lampshade|Hanging}}d the trope. Carrie remarks to her screenwriter boyfriend-of-the-season that his TV script about a bunch of young actors living in a Manhattan penthouse is hardly realistic.
** Another episode reveals her apartment was rent controlled. When Aidan buys her building and gives her the option of either buying the apartment or leaving, she starts to look at more believably-priced buildings (including one which apparently reeks because it's right above an Indian restaurant.) Apparently, she got the apartment and the rental value just exploded around her.
** The exterior of her apartment, actually a five bedroom townhouse, sold for $13.2 million in 2013.

to:

* Carrie from ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' is an interesting example, as this depends on whether the episode in question [[DependingOnTheWriter depicts her as a nationwide sensation like the real Candace Bushnell or as another workaday columnist.]] If the latter is true, then it's unknown how she can afford her nice apartment and her extensive collection of shoes.
**
shoes. One episode {{lampshade|Hanging}}d the trope. Carrie remarks to her screenwriter boyfriend-of-the-season that his TV script about a bunch of young actors living in a Manhattan penthouse is hardly realistic.
**
realistic. Another episode reveals her apartment was rent controlled. When Aidan buys her building and gives her the option of either buying the apartment or leaving, she starts to look at more believably-priced buildings (including one which apparently reeks because it's right above an Indian restaurant.) Apparently, she got the apartment and the rental value just exploded around her.
**
her. The exterior of her apartment, actually a five bedroom townhouse, sold for $13.2 million in 2013.



* In ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', Jerry and Elaine have steady jobs, and Jerry's apartment is based heavily on his actual former apartment in the Upper West Side. George's living arrangements depend on his employment status, sometimes resulting in him having to live with his parents. As far as Kramer is concerned, no one has any idea how he can afford his apartment with no obvious source of income, but this was kind of a RunningGag throughout the series. It was shown in an episode of ''Series/MadAboutYou'' that Kramer sublets from Paul and that Paul doesn't want to let go of the apartment; as such he may be subletting at under market value as Kramer is a "good" tenant.
** In an early episode, it's mentioned that the rent of the apartment above Jerry's is only $400 (possibly ''actually'' rent controlled, considering the former resident was an elderly lady).

to:

* In ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', Jerry and Elaine have steady jobs, and Jerry's apartment is based heavily on his actual former apartment in the Upper West Side. George's living arrangements depend on his employment status, sometimes resulting in him having to live with his parents. As far as Kramer is concerned, no one has any idea how he can afford his apartment with no obvious source of income, but this was kind of a RunningGag throughout the series. It was shown in an episode of ''Series/MadAboutYou'' that Kramer sublets from Paul and that Paul doesn't want to let go of the apartment; as such he may be subletting at under market value as Kramer is a "good" tenant.
**
tenant. In an early episode, it's mentioned that the rent of the apartment above Jerry's is only $400 (possibly ''actually'' rent controlled, considering the former resident was an elderly lady).



** Although not an apartment, Buffy and Willow's dorm room is rather large for a dorm housing incoming freshmen. It was even dubbed the "Largest Dorm Ever" by Website/TelevisionWithoutPity.

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** Although not an apartment, Buffy and Willow's dorm room is rather large for a dorm housing incoming freshmen. It was even dubbed the "Largest Dorm Ever" by Website/TelevisionWithoutPity.



** In seasons 1-3 Joyce has a gallery and yet Buffy is always shown wearing the latest fashions in every episode without working on her own. While one could argue that Buffy's father might send money their way it's still a huge stretch that Joyce's gallery pays for their nice house (and the constant repairs to it), all their luxuries and Buffy's designer wardrobe.
*** In one episode, Xander comments that Joyce had at some point taken to buying cheap furniture (the coffee table was made of balsa wood) and having workable yet inexpensive repair work done around the main window due to the constant damage to the house.

to:

** In seasons 1-3 Joyce has a gallery and yet Buffy is always shown wearing the latest fashions in every episode without working on her own. While one could argue that Buffy's father might send money their way it's still a huge stretch that Joyce's gallery pays for their nice house (and the constant repairs to it), all their luxuries and Buffy's designer wardrobe.
***
wardrobe. In one episode, Xander comments that Joyce had at some point taken to buying cheap furniture (the coffee table was made of balsa wood) and having workable yet inexpensive repair work done around the main window due to the constant damage to the house.



* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'': Four unemployed college students are renting a house in London. Averted partly by the implication that Mike is blackmailing their landlord into discounting their rent, partly by the fact that said house is falling to pieces (their first house is condemned and demolished at the end of the first episode), and almost entirely by the fact that all UK higher education students at the time got a generous means-tested grant to cover their living expenses, Housing Benefit to top up any shortfall, unemployment benefit during vacations and paid no tuition fees. Part of the joke was the needless squalor in which they lived, given how relatively well-off students could be.
** Private rents were a LOT cheaper in London in those days (in the early days of Right to Buy when council housing wasn't yet so scarce and tenancy laws were different) - there were still cheapish, dodgy areas -and unemployment benefits were rather more in real terms than they are now, so this is justified.
** Subverted in the final episode where they get turfed out when Jerzy has enough of them not paying rent.

to:

* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'': Four unemployed college students are renting a house in London. Averted partly by the implication that Mike is blackmailing their landlord into discounting their rent, partly by the fact that said the house is falling to pieces (their first house is condemned and demolished at the end of the first episode), and almost entirely by the fact that all UK higher education students at the time got a generous means-tested grant to cover their living expenses, Housing Benefit to top up any shortfall, unemployment benefit during vacations and paid no tuition fees. Part of the joke was the needless squalor in which they lived, given how relatively well-off students could be.
** Private rents were a LOT cheaper in London in those days (in the early days of Right to Buy when council housing wasn't yet so scarce and tenancy laws were different) - there were still cheapish, dodgy areas -and unemployment benefits were rather more in real terms than they are now, so this is justified.
** Subverted in
be. In the final episode where episode, they get turfed out when Jerzy has enough of them not paying rent.



* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'': The house that Ellie, Marco, Paige, and Alex (replaced with Griffin later on) shared looked a little more spacious than what four college students could realistically afford.

to:

* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'': ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'':
**
The house that Ellie, Marco, Paige, and Alex (replaced with Griffin later on) shared looked a little more spacious than what four college students could realistically afford.



** Inverted by the school gym, which is considerably smaller than the regulation basketball court a HighSchool gym would be built around, and shot to look larger than it is.



* Played with on ''Series/NewGirl''. The three guys live in an extremely spacious loft apartment even though Nick works as a bartender and has almost no money, and Winston is unemployed. Schmidt, however, makes a lot of money at his job and it is implied he covers the bulk of the rent, while Jess likely covers some rent as well, and the apartment has quite a few defects and a landlord who isn't entirely sane. It also bears mentioning that they live in Los Angeles, not New York City, where rent is more affordable. Similar apartments rent for [[http://la.curbed.com/2015/6/3/9955406/new-girl-apartment $4,500 a month]].
** Is gradually averted as the series wears on. Winston eventually gets a job as a cop, for a while Coach is living there as well. As of the most recent season, there are at least six people living in the loft. Also, while the common are of the loft is spacious, the bathroom and bedrooms appear fairly cramped.

to:

* Played with on Zigzagged in ''Series/NewGirl''. The three guys live cast lives in an extremely spacious loft apartment even though Nick works as a bartender and has almost no money, and Winston is unemployed. Schmidt, however, makes a lot of money at his job and it is implied he covers the bulk of the rent, while Jess likely covers some rent as well, and the apartment has quite a few defects and a landlord who isn't entirely sane. It also bears mentioning that they live in Los Angeles, not New York City, where rent and their fortunes rise and fall over the course of the show. Winston and Jess are each jobless at some point in the early seasons, and Nick is more affordable.always broke. However, Schmidt does make a good living at a white collar job. In later seasons, as many as six people are living in the loft, splitting the rent. Similar apartments rent for [[http://la.curbed.com/2015/6/3/9955406/new-girl-apartment $4,500 a month]].
** Is gradually averted as the series wears on. Winston eventually gets a job as a cop, for a while Coach is living there as well. As of the most recent season, there are at least six people living in the loft. Also, while the common are of the loft is spacious, the bathroom and bedrooms appear fairly cramped.
month]].



* ''Series/HomeImprovement'': The Taylors' house seems rather, especially given the fact that Tim is the only one bringing in a paycheck for 90% of the show. Jill works on and off for the first two seasons in low-key office jobs but then spends the remainder of the series in college. Tim is quoted many times as working on a "low-rated cable show" (which he only seems to work at for a few hours a day), yet he can afford a two-story house with two ([[ContinuitySnarl sometimes three]]) bathrooms, three bedrooms, an enormous living room and kitchen, an oversized basement and an attic you can stand up in.
** It was established that Tim was so successful as a salesman that the show is a working retirement for all practical purposes (they made the next-best salesman CEO). Furthermore, the show is set in Royal Oak, Michigan, which is a mid-range income neighborhood. Tim does make regular improvements to the house, exploiting the show's financial reimbursement for using the project as a series of episodes (free labor and half the cost of supplies) and the show is basically a commercial for the tool company, so in some respects Tim is still working as their salesman.
21st Mar '17 5:07:37 AM Bionicman
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* ''Series/FullHouse'': Some found it unrealistic that Danny could have afforded what was obviously a very nice, very big town house in a presumably equally very nice section of San Francisco on a TV morning show host's salary, as well as support three young children. There's never any mention of Joey or Jesse paying him rent (not that they could have, given how sporadic their employment was for the first few seasons of the show). [[FridgeBrilliance Then again, given that Danny was a widower, maybe his late wife's life insurance helped some.]]

to:

* ''Series/FullHouse'': Some found it unrealistic that Danny could have afforded what was obviously a very nice, very big town house in a presumably equally very nice section of San Francisco on a TV morning show host's salary, as well as support three young children. There's never any mention of Joey or Jesse paying him rent (not that they could have, given how sporadic their employment was for the first few seasons of the show). [[FridgeBrilliance Then again, given that Danny was a widower, maybe his late wife's life insurance helped some.]]
18th Mar '17 10:48:42 AM CL
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* {{Subverted|Trope}} in ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' - when Reese storms/is kicked out of the house, he manages to rent a really nice apartment on an (admittedly well-paying) part-time job. However, it turns out he's paying the rent and all the expenses by credit card, and has racked up several thousand dollars debt in a matter of weeks.

to:

* {{Subverted|Trope}} in ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' - when Reese storms/is kicked out of the house, he manages to rent a really nice apartment on an (admittedly well-paying) part-time job. However, it turns out he's paying the rent and all the expenses by credit card, and has racked up several thousand dollars debt in a matter of weeks. It's also implied in a Halloween episode that Malcolm's family can afford their house partly because its value plummeted after the man who lived in it just prior to them went insane, slaughtered his family, and decorated the place with their body parts.
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