History Main / FriendsRentControl

18th May '18 9:08:33 PM FGHIK
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* [[TheAllegedHouse The ''quality'' of the place]]. Busted appliances, structural damage, and being in a [[WrongSideOfTheTracks "quaint"]] neighborhood also drive the price down.

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* [[TheAllegedHouse The ''quality'' ''[[TheAllegedHouse quality]]'' of the place]].place. Busted appliances, structural damage, and being in a [[WrongSideOfTheTracks "quaint"]] neighborhood also drive the price down.
18th May '18 9:07:25 PM FGHIK
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* [[TheAllegedHouae The ''quality'' of the place]]. Busted appliances, structural damage, and being in a [[WrongSideOfTheTracks "quaint"]] neighborhood also drive the price down.

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* [[TheAllegedHouae [[TheAllegedHouse The ''quality'' of the place]]. Busted appliances, structural damage, and being in a [[WrongSideOfTheTracks "quaint"]] neighborhood also drive the price down.
18th May '18 9:07:11 PM FGHIK
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* The ''quality'' of the place. Busted appliances, structural damage, and being in a [[WrongSideOfTheTracks "quaint"]] neighborhood also drive the price down.

to:

* [[TheAllegedHouae The ''quality'' of the place.place]]. Busted appliances, structural damage, and being in a [[WrongSideOfTheTracks "quaint"]] neighborhood also drive the price down.
15th May '18 7:18:56 PM jharrison3051
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* New York City's rent control laws have allowed long-time tenants to hold onto ''insanely'' low rents as the city has become increasingly expensive. [[http://nypost.com/2012/03/18/soho-seniors-spend-as-little-as-55-a-month-for-rent-controlled-apartments/ Two longtime tenants]] in Manhattan's trendy [=SoHo=] neighborhood paid $55 and $71 a month where the average rent for a one bedroom apartment is over $2,500. [[https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/14/us/new-york-apartment-rent-control-actress-trnd/index.html One woman]] paid only $28 a month for a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village she has rented for 63 years, which would go for over $5,000 on the open market.

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* New York City's rent control laws have allowed long-time tenants to hold onto ''insanely'' low rents as the city has become increasingly expensive. [[http://nypost.com/2012/03/18/soho-seniors-spend-as-little-as-55-a-month-for-rent-controlled-apartments/ Two longtime tenants]] in Manhattan's trendy [=SoHo=] neighborhood paid $55 and $71 a month where the average rent for a one bedroom apartment is over $2,500. [[https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/14/us/new-york-apartment-rent-control-actress-trnd/index.html One woman]] paid only $28 a month for a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village she has had been rented for 63 years, which would go estimated to rent for over $5,000 on the open market.
15th May '18 7:17:32 PM jharrison3051
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* An article in [[http://nypost.com/2012/03/18/soho-seniors-spend-as-little-as-55-a-month-for-rent-controlled-apartments/ The New York Post]] profiled two tenants in Manhattan's trendy [=SoHo=] neighborhood with ''insanely'' low rents - $55 and $71 a month - the result of decades of rent control in a neighborhood where the average rent for a one bedroom apartment is over $2,500.

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* An article in New York City's rent control laws have allowed long-time tenants to hold onto ''insanely'' low rents as the city has become increasingly expensive. [[http://nypost.com/2012/03/18/soho-seniors-spend-as-little-as-55-a-month-for-rent-controlled-apartments/ The New York Post]] profiled two tenants Two longtime tenants]] in Manhattan's trendy [=SoHo=] neighborhood with ''insanely'' low rents - paid $55 and $71 a month - the result of decades of rent control in a neighborhood where the average rent for a one bedroom apartment is over $2,500.$2,500. [[https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/14/us/new-york-apartment-rent-control-actress-trnd/index.html One woman]] paid only $28 a month for a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village she has rented for 63 years, which would go for over $5,000 on the open market.
7th May '18 6:18:53 PM dmcreif
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** Done in "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants," where a murder victim is a shoe salesman who lives in a converted loft apartment (also pretty expensive real estate). It's lampshaded as the characters wonder how a lowly shoe salesman is able to afford such a place.
** In "Mr. Monk and the Marathon Man," the murder victim Gwen Zaleski is an out-of-work actress who lives in a pretty nice 21st floor apartment. It's explained here that her lover Trevor [=McDowell=], furniture showroom magnate, was paying her bills.

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** Done in "Mr. the tie-in book ''Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants," Assistants,'' where a murder victim is a shoe salesman who lives in a converted loft apartment (also pretty expensive real estate). It's lampshaded as the characters wonder how a lowly shoe salesman is able to afford such a place.
** In "Mr. Monk and the Marathon Man," the murder victim Gwen Zaleski is an out-of-work actress who lives in a pretty nice 21st floor apartment. It's explained here that her lover Trevor [=McDowell=], furniture showroom magnate, was paying her bills. That [=McDowell=] was about to stop paying the bills is considered by Monk as a clue that implicates him as the killer.
7th May '18 6:13:11 PM dmcreif
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** Matt Murdock lives in a pretty large apartment in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, which has some of the highest rent prices in the United States. As a recent law school graduate who's only just starting his own practice, this place should be well outside Matt's budget. But, it's mentioned in the first episode that Hell's Kitchen saw property values drop due to damage sustained during "The [[Film/TheAvengers2012 Incident]]". Making Matt's apartment even cheaper is its generally run-down aesthetic (hell, the minibar is made of unfinished plywood), and the bright electronic billboard across the street that shines brightly through the living room window - an eyesore for anyone with functioning eyes, but not a problem for a blind man.

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** Matt Murdock lives in a pretty large apartment in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan, Kitchen, which has some of the highest rent prices in the United States. As a recent law school graduate who's only just starting his own practice, this place should be well outside Matt's budget. But, it's mentioned in the first episode when Matt and Foggy are scouting out their space for Nelson & Murdock that Hell's Kitchen saw property values drop due to damage sustained during "The [[Film/TheAvengers2012 Incident]]". Making Matt's apartment even cheaper is its generally run-down aesthetic (hell, (notice that the minibar is made of unfinished plywood), and the bright electronic billboard across the street that shines brightly through the living room window - an eyesore for anyone with functioning eyes, but not a problem for a blind man.



** Matt's living situation gets a bit more complicated in ''Series/TheDefenders2017'', since he's still living out of the apartment but is now an independent ''pro bono'' attorney, and probably earns less than he earned at Nelson & Murdock. While it's never said out loud, it is heavily implied that Matt received a large inheritance from Elektra upon her death at the end of Season 2. Lampshaded in "Ashes, Ashes" when Matt and Series/JessicaJones2015 drop by the apartment so Matt can change into civilian clothes before they go to interview John Raymond's daughter, and Jessica asks Matt, "So you wanna tell me how a pro bono lawyer can afford a loft like this in New York City?" Matt responds by telling her about the billboard, and jokes that he sometimes helps his landlord with tenants that are late with their rent.
** Karen Page also averts it. To show that she actually makes less money working at Nelson & Murdock than she did at her Union Allied job, she's shown as having had to move to a somewhat cheaper apartment in between Season 1 and 2.

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** Matt's living situation gets a bit more complicated in ''Series/TheDefenders2017'', since he's still living out of the apartment but is now an independent ''pro bono'' attorney, and probably earns less than he earned at Nelson & Murdock. While it's never said out loud, it is heavily It's implied that Matt received a large inheritance from Elektra upon her death at the end of Season 2. Lampshaded in "Ashes, Ashes" when Matt and Series/JessicaJones2015 Jessica Jones drop by the apartment so Matt can change into civilian clothes before they go to interview John Raymond's daughter, and Jessica asks Matt, "So you wanna tell me how a pro bono lawyer can afford a loft like this in New York City?" Matt responds by telling her about the billboard, and jokes (badly) that he sometimes helps his landlord with tenants that are late with their rent.
** Karen Page also averts it. To show that In season 1, she's living in a pretty decent-sized one bedroom apartment. While she actually makes less money working lives in this apartment off the Union Allied payoff money, at least until Nelson & Murdock than she did at is making enough revenue to pay her Union Allied job, she's shown as having had a salary, the money eventually does run out. And ultimately, Karen has to move downsize to a somewhat cheaper studio apartment in the interim between Season 1 and 2.Season 2. By the time ''The Punisher'' and ''Daredevil'' season 3 roll around, Karen has moved yet again, to a slightly larger apartment, both because her new job as a reporter at the ''New York Bulletin'' pays more than she ever was paid at Nelson & Murdock, and also because she wants to distance herself from the various acts of violence she was subjected to in her season 2 apartment (including getting shot at by the Blacksmith's men and kidnapped by the Hand).
22nd Apr '18 2:35:19 PM wuggles
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* Averted on ''Difficult People'', where aspiring actor/current waiter Billy lives in an "apartment" that is the size of a dorm room, and has only a microwave as a kitchen. Julie, also an aspiring actor, lives in a bigger apartment, but it's established throughout the show that she's entirely supported by her boyfriend, who works for Creator/{{PBS}}.
13th Mar '18 4:12:27 PM ZerroDefex
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Added DiffLines:

*** In an early episode the landlord offers Michael a month rent-free in exchange for help with a problem, it's implied that this might not be the only time they've made such an arrangement.
6th Mar '18 12:56:43 AM karategal
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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' seems to enjoy toying with this. [[spoiler: It helps that the characters who live alone don't require things like food or heat to survive.]] Mami, Homura and Kyoko are 15-year old girls who live alone in a fairly large Japanese city with no income, yet they can each afford their own homes. Homura owns a large apartment in a European-styled building with modern furniture and holographic displays, though odds are she steals things to afford it (or stole the apartment itself), given [[spoiler:that's how she gets her weapons]]. Kyoko is shown in nice rooms, but [[spoiler:she's homeless, and the nice rooms are hotel rooms she gets into]]. Mami's apartment is an aversion at first; it is rather large, yet barren and spartan, with cheap furnishings that reasonably fit with her means. However, this realism was a byproduct of the animation budget running out. The Blu-Ray version fills her house with all sorts of things that she could never afford, planting it [[http://images.puella-magi.net/7/76/Mami_nice_apt.jpg?20110426211524 firmly]] into this trope.

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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' seems to enjoy toying with this. [[spoiler: It helps that the characters who live alone don't require things like food or heat to survive.]] Mami, Homura Homura, and Kyoko are 15-year old girls who live alone in a fairly large Japanese city with no income, yet they can each afford their own homes. Homura owns a large apartment in a European-styled building with modern furniture and holographic displays, though odds are she steals things to afford it (or stole the apartment itself), given [[spoiler:that's how she gets her weapons]]. Kyoko is shown in nice rooms, but [[spoiler:she's homeless, and the nice rooms are hotel rooms she gets into]]. Mami's apartment is an aversion at first; it is rather large, yet barren and spartan, with cheap furnishings that reasonably fit with her means. However, this realism was a byproduct of the animation budget running out. The Blu-Ray version fills her house with all sorts of things that she could never afford, planting it [[http://images.puella-magi.net/7/76/Mami_nice_apt.jpg?20110426211524 firmly]] into this trope.



* The heroes of ''Film/LakeviewTerrace'' buy a large, beautiful house with an in-ground pool in a wealthy district of Los Angeles, an area with very high housing costs. They refer to this as a "starter home." The villain as well, who is able to afford a house in the same neighborhood while working as a beat cop, with the additional burden of two children and a deceased spouse. Even with him mentioning "working my ass off, saving every dime", it's too implausible--[[FridgeLogic unless one assumes his late wife's insurance helped]].

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* The heroes of ''Film/LakeviewTerrace'' buy a large, beautiful house with an in-ground pool in a wealthy district of Los Angeles, an area with very high housing costs. They refer to this as a "starter home." The villain as well, who is able to afford a house in the same neighborhood while working as a beat cop, with the additional burden of two children and a deceased spouse. Even with him mentioning "working my ass off, saving every dime", it's too implausible--[[FridgeLogic implausible -- [[FridgeLogic unless one assumes his late wife's insurance helped]].



* ''Film/SleepingWithTheEnemy'': Laura is able to rent, fix up, and maintain a HUGE, beautiful home, despite only having worked a part-time job at a library before fleeing her abusive husband and initially not working ''at all'' when she does get away. And when she does finally start working, she's still in a job that doesn't pay much. Even for Iowa in the early 90's that's quite a stretch. As well as that she's able to afford plenty of luxuries like brand name products. The book is only slightly better--Sara/Laura paid a month's rent for one floor of a house in advance but then had to live on beans and apples for two weeks until her job (which came out of nowhere and paid very well, not to mention paid ''in advance'') started. The rent was supposed to be "cut" because Laura was willing to paint, but it couldn't have been cut ''that'' much; painting is a one-time expense. So the real question is why she fled her husband after months of planning without even enough money to pay for a month's expenses, knowing she'd have to be exceptionally lucky to land a job that doesn't require an identity.

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* ''Film/SleepingWithTheEnemy'': Laura is able to rent, fix up, and maintain a HUGE, beautiful home, despite only having worked a part-time job at a library before fleeing her abusive husband and initially not working ''at all'' when she does get away. And when she does finally start working, she's still in a job that doesn't pay much. Even for Iowa in the early 90's that's quite a stretch. As well as that she's able to afford plenty of luxuries like brand name products. The book is only slightly better--Sara/Laura better -- Sara/Laura paid a month's rent for one floor of a house in advance but then had to live on beans and apples for two weeks until her job (which came out of nowhere and paid very well, not to mention paid ''in advance'') started. The rent was supposed to be "cut" because Laura was willing to paint, but it couldn't have been cut ''that'' much; painting is a one-time expense. So the real question is why she fled her husband after months of planning without even enough money to pay for a month's expenses, knowing she'd have to be exceptionally lucky to land a job that doesn't require an identity.



* In ''Film/TheSkulls'', Will, Luke and Chloe live in dorm rooms that are bigger and nicer than some people's apartments--and single rooms at that, which are more expensive than shared--even though it's been said repeatedly that Luke is struggling financially and is only at this prestigious university via scholarship. This might ironically explain how ''he'' is able to afford such a nice room--he's seen working as well--but there's still no explanation for how Will can. A throwaway line indicates that Chloe is wealthy, but even so, dorm rooms simply do NOT look like that.
* Lois Lane's Metropolis apartment in ''Film/{{Superman}}'' is awfully, awfully nice--with a balcony, no less! {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Magazine/{{MAD}}'' Magazine's satire of the movie:

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* In ''Film/TheSkulls'', Will, Luke Luke, and Chloe live in dorm rooms that are bigger and nicer than some people's apartments--and apartments -- and single rooms at that, which are more expensive than shared--even shared -- even though it's been said repeatedly that Luke is struggling financially and is only at this prestigious university via scholarship. This might ironically explain how ''he'' is able to afford such a nice room--he's room -- he's seen working as well--but well -- but there's still no explanation for how Will can. A throwaway line indicates that Chloe is wealthy, but even so, dorm rooms simply do NOT look like that.
* Lois Lane's Metropolis apartment in ''Film/{{Superman}}'' is awfully, awfully nice--with nice -- with a balcony, no less! {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Magazine/{{MAD}}'' Magazine's satire of the movie:



** The second season of their TV series ''LA 7'' fits closest to the trope. S Club 7 manage to find a pretty nice building with enough room for seven people. Their landlady Joni features as a supporting character and she first gives them the apartment out of sympathy. The gang are constantly talking about how they're broke and owe each other money, hand-waving it somewhat. One episode also has the power getting rather easily shut down just from all seven using it at once - and Joni claims that the wiring was "kind of a death trap".

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** The second season of their TV series ''LA 7'' fits closest to the trope. S Club 7 manage to find a pretty nice building with enough room for seven people. Their landlady Joni features as a supporting character and she first gives them the apartment out of sympathy. The gang are constantly talking about how they're broke and owe each other money, hand-waving it somewhat. One episode also has the power getting rather easily shut down just from all seven using it at once - -- and Joni claims that the wiring was "kind of a death trap".



* Mostly averted on ''Series/{{Community}}'', however the Troy/Abed/Annie apartment in Season Three plays the trope relatively straight. Although Annie is a penny-pincher and both Troy and Abed are probably getting support from their parents, their means of paying for the apartment is never explicitly stated. However, being in Colorado and not New York, this is not too much of a stretch.
* Seemingly played straight, then {{justified|Trope}} and {{averted|Trope}} in ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia''. Dennis and Mac live in a nice two-bedroom apartment with a leather couch, despite making less than they would on unemployment. Dee lives alone in a very nice apartment despite making even less than the bar owners. Dennis and Dee come from a wealthy family, however, and a season 5 episode explicitly mentions that Frank pays Dee's rent (and presumably at least helping with Dennis'). Meanwhile, Charlie lives in abject squalor, averting the trope entirely.

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* Mostly averted on ''Series/{{Community}}'', however the Troy/Abed/Annie apartment in Season Three 3 plays the trope relatively straight. Although Annie is a penny-pincher and both Troy and Abed are probably getting support from their parents, their means of paying for the apartment is never explicitly stated. However, being in Colorado and not New York, this is not too much of a stretch.
* Seemingly played straight, then {{justified|Trope}} and {{averted|Trope}} in ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia''. Dennis and Mac live in a nice two-bedroom apartment with a leather couch, despite making less than they would on unemployment. Dee lives alone in a very nice apartment despite making even less than the bar owners. Dennis and Dee come from a wealthy family, however, and a season Season 5 episode explicitly mentions that Frank pays Dee's rent (and presumably at least helping with Dennis'). Meanwhile, Charlie lives in abject squalor, averting the trope entirely.



** Mohinder is able to afford a ''huge'' apartment in Brooklyn working as a taxi driver, as was his dad. Apparently -- according to season 2, when [[spoiler:Matt and Molly move in with him]] -- it was a three-bedroom, only one of which was occupied throughout season 1. We do, however, see Mohinder's family's BigFancyHouse in India, implying that his family was wealthy. [[FridgeLogic Which makes you wonder why they were working as cabbies in the first place...]]

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** Mohinder is able to afford a ''huge'' apartment in Brooklyn working as a taxi driver, as was his dad. Apparently -- according to season Season 2, when [[spoiler:Matt and Molly move in with him]] -- it was a three-bedroom, only one of which was occupied throughout season Season 1. We do, however, see Mohinder's family's BigFancyHouse in India, implying that his family was wealthy. [[FridgeLogic Which makes you wonder why they were working as cabbies in the first place...]]



** The apartment where Ted, Marshall, and Lily live has an abnormally large main room but is otherwise not that big. Both the kitchen and the bedrooms are fairly small (Ted's drafting table is in the main room cause it won't fit anywhere else) and it's implied the building itself isn't that great. Ted has always been employed as an architect and Marshall lives off his student loans. Averted when Lily moves out and ends up living in a one room apartment so small that its Murphy bed can't even come down all the way. Lampshaded by Ted in season four: "I thought having a rent-controlled apartment on the Upper West Side was half the reason she agreed to marry me."
** Justified when Marshall and Lily move into their own place--It's nice, but not overly spacious, and it's stated to be outside their price range despite both of them working full-time (he as a lawyer!). It makes even more sense when we find out that the only reason it was even close to their price range was that it stinks due to its proximity to a sewage plant, and the floors are not level.
** Robin's original apartment in the first few seasons is also pretty spacious considering she worked for a low-end news job at the worst station in New York and had five dogs. Season 9 explains that Robin has a lot of money from her wealthy family - and she was previously a famous Canadian pop star.

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** The apartment where Ted, Marshall, and Lily live has an abnormally large main room but is otherwise not that big. Both the kitchen and the bedrooms are fairly small (Ted's drafting table is in the main room cause it won't fit anywhere else) and it's implied the building itself isn't that great. Ted has always been employed as an architect and Marshall lives off his student loans. Averted when Lily moves out and ends up living in a one room apartment so small that its Murphy bed can't even come down all the way. Lampshaded by Ted in season four: Season 4: "I thought having a rent-controlled apartment on the Upper West Side was half the reason she agreed to marry me."
** Justified when Marshall and Lily move into their own place--It's place -- it's nice, but not overly spacious, and it's stated to be outside their price range despite both of them working full-time (he as a lawyer!). It makes even more sense when we find out that the only reason it was even close to their price range was that it stinks due to its proximity to a sewage plant, and the floors are not level.
** Robin's original apartment in the first few seasons is also pretty spacious considering she worked for a low-end news job at the worst station in New York and had five dogs. Season 9 explains that Robin has a lot of money from her wealthy family - -- and she was previously a famous Canadian pop star.



* ''Series/ICarly'': The living room and dining room are somewhat realistic, but how many condos do you know that have a second ''and'' third floor and an elevator? It's also decked out with the latest technology. The GrandFinale confirmed that the elevator opened up to more floors than just the three the Shays used, which might explain why they can afford the apartment - Anyone can enter their apartment at anytime, without their permission.

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* ''Series/ICarly'': The living room and dining room are somewhat realistic, but how many condos do you know that have a second ''and'' third floor and an elevator? It's also decked out with the latest technology. The GrandFinale confirmed that the elevator opened up to more floors than just the three the Shays used, which might explain why they can afford the apartment - -- Anyone can enter their apartment at anytime, without their permission.



** It was also never explained how Angel could afford to live and keep an office in the building that he used for Season 1. The hotel used for Season 2 onwards however received two handwaves on the subject: first a wealthy client who owed Angel Investigations a favour handled all of the paperwork on the matter, then [[AmoralAttorney Lilah]] (in order to piss off a co-worker) fabricated even more paperwork. Some episodes show that Angel has a sizable collection of antiques from his three hundred years of being a vampire - so presumably he sells them to avoid money problems.

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** It was also never explained how Angel could afford to live and keep an office in the building that he used for Season 1. The hotel used for Season 2 onwards however received two handwaves on the subject: first a wealthy client who owed Angel Investigations a favour handled all of the paperwork on the matter, then [[AmoralAttorney Lilah]] (in order to piss off a co-worker) fabricated even more paperwork. Some episodes show that Angel has a sizable collection of antiques from his three hundred years of being a vampire - -- so presumably he sells them to avoid money problems.



* On ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' it was initially played straight - with the three sisters owning a spacious house in San Francisco, which has some of the most expensive real estate in the US. The house has been in the family for generations, but even the property tax would be a too much for a bank teller-turned-head chef and museum curator-turned-auctioneer to afford. Around the fifth season it's a bit more realistic; Piper now runs a club that is always packed with people (and is able to afford respectable musical guests) and Phoebe is doing well enough as an advice columnist to appear on talk shows and get billboards. The house ''is'' said to have been built on a spiritual Nexus generations ago, being passed down over the years - so we have to assume that their ancestors exploited AWizardDidIt quite a bit - if the show weren't really big on the "not using magic for personal gain" thing; the need to protect the nexus the house is sitting on from falling into the hands of evil might have allowed them to get around that.
* In ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'', the family lives in a beautiful dwelling. But the father is only a weatherman on the local news. And he does a lousy job of predicting the weather. As for the mother, we never even see her working. What's more is that the pilot episode implies the house comes from Drake's side of the family - so Audrey must be doing very well for herself to own such a house while supporting two children. Audrey is divorced from her first husband so she may have won the house in a settlement, considering she appears to have full custody of the children.

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* On ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' it was initially played straight - with the three sisters owning a spacious house in San Francisco, which has some of the most expensive real estate in the US. The house has been in the family for generations, but even the property tax would be a too much for a bank teller-turned-head chef and museum curator-turned-auctioneer to afford. Around the fifth season it's a bit more realistic; Piper now runs a club that is always packed with people (and is able to afford respectable musical guests) and Phoebe is doing well enough as an advice columnist to appear on talk shows and get billboards. The house ''is'' said to have been built on a spiritual Nexus generations ago, being passed down over the years - -- so we have to assume that their ancestors exploited AWizardDidIt quite a bit - -- if the show weren't really big on the "not using magic for personal gain" thing; the need to protect the nexus the house is sitting on from falling into the hands of evil might have allowed them to get around that.
* In ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'', the family lives in a beautiful dwelling. But the father is only a weatherman on the local news. And he does a lousy job of predicting the weather. As for the mother, we never even see her working. What's more is that the pilot episode implies the house comes from Drake's side of the family - -- so Audrey must be doing very well for herself to own such a house while supporting two children. Audrey is divorced from her first husband so she may have won the house in a settlement, considering she appears to have full custody of the children.



** Xander averted this in season four, living in his parents' basement and being charged rent while he went through a number of scut jobs. Then in season five he moves into an absurdly spacious apartment, with the handwave that he had earlier been given a permanent job with a decent level of responsibility. Justified by season seven when he's in charge of a major project and frequently in suits to talk to clients.
** In seasons 1-3 Joyce has a gallery and yet Buffy is always shown wearing the latest fashions in every episode without working on her own. While one could argue that Buffy's father might send money their way it's still a huge stretch that Joyce's gallery pays for their nice house (and the constant repairs to it), all their luxuries and Buffy's designer wardrobe. In one episode, Xander comments that Joyce had at some point taken to buying cheap furniture (the coffee table was made of balsa wood) and having workable yet inexpensive repair work done around the main window due to the constant damage to the house.

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** Xander averted this in season four, Season 4, living in his parents' basement and being charged rent while he went through a number of scut jobs. Then in season five Season 5, he moves into an absurdly spacious apartment, with the handwave that he had earlier been given a permanent job with a decent level of responsibility. Justified by season seven Season 7 when he's in charge of a major project and frequently in suits to talk to clients.
** In seasons 1-3 Seasons 1-3, Joyce has a gallery and yet Buffy is always shown wearing the latest fashions in every episode without working on her own. While one could argue that Buffy's father might send money their way it's still a huge stretch that Joyce's gallery pays for their nice house (and the constant repairs to it), all their luxuries and Buffy's designer wardrobe. In one episode, Xander comments that Joyce had at some point taken to buying cheap furniture (the coffee table was made of balsa wood) and having workable yet inexpensive repair work done around the main window due to the constant damage to the house.



* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'': Four unemployed college students are renting a house in London. Averted partly by the implication that Mike is blackmailing their landlord into discounting their rent, partly by the fact that the house is falling to pieces (their first house is condemned and demolished at the end of the first episode), and almost entirely by the fact that all UK higher education students at the time got a generous means-tested grant to cover their living expenses, Housing Benefit to top up any shortfall, unemployment benefit during vacations and paid no tuition fees. Part of the joke was the needless squalor in which they lived, given how relatively well-off students could be. In the final episode, they get turfed out when Jerzy has enough of them not paying rent.

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* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'': Four unemployed college students are renting a house in London. Averted partly by the implication that Mike is blackmailing their landlord into discounting their rent, partly by the fact that the house is falling to pieces (their first house is condemned and demolished at the end of the first episode), and almost entirely by the fact that all UK higher education students at the time got a generous means-tested grant to cover their living expenses, Housing Benefit to top up any shortfall, unemployment benefit during vacations vacations, and paid no tuition fees. Part of the joke was the needless squalor in which they lived, given how relatively well-off students could be. In the final episode, they get turfed out when Jerzy has enough of them not paying rent.



* On ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', everyone's houses and apartments are very nice and wonderfully decorated, despite everyone having various jobs that should create economic differences between them. Ricky's apartment gets a pass because it used to belong to Leo's wealthy parents. A few headscratchers in particular are Adrian and her mom having an upscale apartment in season one , even though they were supposed to be kinda poor. Daniel and his friends also manage to have lavish apartments, despite being college students.

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* On ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', everyone's houses and apartments are very nice and wonderfully decorated, despite everyone having various jobs that should create economic differences between them. Ricky's apartment gets a pass because it used to belong to Leo's wealthy parents. A few headscratchers in particular are Adrian and her mom having an upscale apartment in season one , Season 1, even though they were supposed to be kinda poor. Daniel and his friends also manage to have lavish apartments, despite being college students.



* Near the end of the first season of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'', Reese moves into a huge apartment overlooking a park that probably has a monthly rent greater than the monthly mortgage payment of most suburban houses, which he ''never'' could have afforded back when he was an Army NCO or a CIA agent (The pay scale for his current job - vigilante working on behalf of reclusive billionaire - never being mentioned). Fortunately, the apartment was provided by his boss, who could easily afford to pay the rent for him (Assuming Finch doesn't own the building outright). Finch also mentions in a later season that he is paying Reese a ''lot'', to the point that he can pay for any lifestyle he chooses even after routinely donating most of it to charity.

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* Near the end of the first season of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'', Reese moves into a huge apartment overlooking a park that probably has a monthly rent greater than the monthly mortgage payment of most suburban houses, which he ''never'' could have afforded back when he was an Army NCO or a CIA agent (The pay scale for his current job - -- vigilante working on behalf of reclusive billionaire - -- never being mentioned). Fortunately, the apartment was provided by his boss, who could easily afford to pay the rent for him (Assuming (assuming Finch doesn't own the building outright). Finch also mentions in a later season that he is paying Reese a ''lot'', to the point that he can pay for any lifestyle he chooses even after routinely donating most of it to charity.



* Justified with Series/{{Sherlock}} and John's flat on Baker Street, as Sherlock has helped the landlady Mrs. Hudson (by ensuring her runaway husband would be executed in the US), so she gives him a discount (unspecified, of course). On the other hand, Sherlock makes no money off his police work and frequently refuses compensation from private clients (John usually steps in and takes the money). John was only shown working once by getting a job as a local doctor... only to fall asleep in the office due to long nights investigating. He does receive pension after being discharged from the army but claims in the pilot that it's not nearly enough to afford a place in London. Also, in the pilot, Mycroft offers to pay John to spy on Sherlock (John didn't know who Mycroft was at the time). When Sherlock finds out, he berates John for refusing and later explains that Mycroft's concern was that of a brother, not an enemy. Mrs. Hudson can afford to live in a townhouse in an expensive London neighborhood because her late husband run a drug cartel and she inherited a sizeable fortune when he was executed.

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* Justified with Series/{{Sherlock}} and John's flat on Baker Street, as Sherlock has helped the landlady Mrs. Hudson (by ensuring her runaway husband would be executed in the US), so she gives him a discount (unspecified, of course). On the other hand, Sherlock makes no money off his police work and frequently refuses compensation from private clients (John usually steps in and takes the money). John was only shown working once by getting a job as a local doctor... only to fall asleep in the office due to long nights investigating. He does receive pension after being discharged from the army but claims in the pilot that it's not nearly enough to afford a place in London. Also, in the pilot, Mycroft offers to pay John to spy on Sherlock (John didn't know who Mycroft was at the time). When Sherlock finds out, he berates John for refusing and later explains that Mycroft's concern was that of a brother, not an enemy. Mrs. Hudson can afford to live in a townhouse in an expensive London neighborhood because her late husband run ran a drug cartel and she inherited a sizeable fortune when he was executed.



* {{Subverted|Trope}} in ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' - when Reese storms/is kicked out of the house, he manages to rent a really nice apartment on an (admittedly well-paying) part-time job. However, it turns out he's paying the rent and all the expenses by credit card, and has racked up several thousand dollars debt in a matter of weeks. It's also implied in a Halloween episode that Malcolm's family can afford their house partly because its value plummeted after the man who lived in it just prior to them went insane, slaughtered his family, and decorated the place with their body parts.

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* {{Subverted|Trope}} in ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' - -- when Reese storms/is kicked out of the house, he manages to rent a really nice apartment on an (admittedly well-paying) part-time job. However, it turns out he's paying the rent and all the expenses by credit card, and has racked up several thousand dollars debt in a matter of weeks. It's also implied in a Halloween episode that Malcolm's family can afford their house partly because its value plummeted after the man who lived in it just prior to them went insane, slaughtered his family, and decorated the place with their body parts.



** The Bushwick loft that the New York group live in starting in season 4. At first it's just Rachel and Kurt, then Santana joins them but doesn't seem to pay rent. The loft is quite spacious, though the apparently low price could be justified by the fact that it's very far from Manhattan and the neighbourhood is rough. Still, for a while the only one with a job is Kurt who had an internship at Vogue.com until the three of them got part time jobs at a diner. It's possible that their parents are helping them out though since they are college students. Now though Rachel and Santana have moved out so it's just Blaine and Kurt living there, and Blaine doesn't have a job (yet) so we don't know how that loft is getting paid for. Blaine's parents have been noted to be well-off enough to pay the high tuition cost at Dalton, so they probably help out.

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** The Bushwick loft that the New York group live in starting in season Season 4. At first it's just Rachel and Kurt, then Santana joins them but doesn't seem to pay rent. The loft is quite spacious, though the apparently low price could be justified by the fact that it's very far from Manhattan and the neighbourhood is rough. Still, for a while the only one with a job is Kurt who had an internship at Vogue.com until the three of them got part time jobs at a diner. It's possible that their parents are helping them out though since they are college students. Now though Rachel and Santana have moved out so it's just Blaine and Kurt living there, and Blaine doesn't have a job (yet) so we don't know how that loft is getting paid for. Blaine's parents have been noted to be well-off enough to pay the high tuition cost at Dalton, so they probably help out.



** Matt's living situation gets a bit more complicated in ''Series/TheDefenders2017'', since he's still living out of the apartment but is now an independent ''pro bono'' attorney, and probably earns less than he earned at Nelson & Murdock. While it's never said out loud, it is heavily implied that Matt received a large inheritance from Elektra upon her death at the end of season 2. Lampshaded in "Ashes, Ashes" when Matt and Series/JessicaJones2015 drop by the apartment so Matt can change into civilian clothes before they go to interview John Raymond's daughter, and Jessica asks Matt, "So you wanna tell me how a pro bono lawyer can afford a loft like this in New York City?" Matt responds by telling her about the billboard, and jokes that he sometimes helps his landlord with tenants that are late with their rent.
** Karen Page also averts it. To show that she actually makes less money working at Nelson & Murdock than she did at her Union Allied job, she's shown as having had to move to a somewhat cheaper apartment in between season 1 and 2.

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** Matt's living situation gets a bit more complicated in ''Series/TheDefenders2017'', since he's still living out of the apartment but is now an independent ''pro bono'' attorney, and probably earns less than he earned at Nelson & Murdock. While it's never said out loud, it is heavily implied that Matt received a large inheritance from Elektra upon her death at the end of season Season 2. Lampshaded in "Ashes, Ashes" when Matt and Series/JessicaJones2015 drop by the apartment so Matt can change into civilian clothes before they go to interview John Raymond's daughter, and Jessica asks Matt, "So you wanna tell me how a pro bono lawyer can afford a loft like this in New York City?" Matt responds by telling her about the billboard, and jokes that he sometimes helps his landlord with tenants that are late with their rent.
** Karen Page also averts it. To show that she actually makes less money working at Nelson & Murdock than she did at her Union Allied job, she's shown as having had to move to a somewhat cheaper apartment in between season Season 1 and 2.



** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in Season 1, Jake lives in a large, pleasant apartment despite being ''terrible'' with money (to the point where he's implied to have declared bankruptcy at least once) - it's quickly explained that it was his grandmother's apartment, and that he still benefits from the rent control she negotiated decades earlier (Jake and Gina both refer to having spent time in the apartment during childhood; they're now in their early thirties). Furthermore, almost as soon as the apartment appears on-screen it's revealed that he's about to lose it because the building is about to become a co-op and he can't afford to purchase the place. In the end, Gina puts a down payment on the apartment for herself, but this time it's {{justified|Trope}} by the fact that she's been renting the same one-room studio for over ten years and saving up until a nicer place came along.

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** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in Season 1, Jake lives in a large, pleasant apartment despite being ''terrible'' with money (to the point where he's implied to have declared bankruptcy at least once) - -- it's quickly explained that it was his grandmother's apartment, and that he still benefits from the rent control she negotiated decades earlier (Jake and Gina both refer to having spent time in the apartment during childhood; they're now in their early thirties). Furthermore, almost as soon as the apartment appears on-screen it's revealed that he's about to lose it because the building is about to become a co-op and he can't afford to purchase the place. In the end, Gina puts a down payment on the apartment for herself, but this time it's {{justified|Trope}} by the fact that she's been renting the same one-room studio for over ten years and saving up until a nicer place came along.



* In ''Just the Ten of Us'', the Lubbocks live in a house in Eureka, California that's big enough to comfortably house ten people. The parents are a Catholic school coach and a homemaker. Especially bad as a running theme is that the family is struggling financially. It's indicated that the school provided the family with the house. And even if not, it's also implied that it isn't the nicest of places--the four oldest sisters share an attic bedroom, son JR shares with his baby brother, youngest daughter Sherry shares with her baby sister.
* Tony [=DiNozzo=] of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' lives in a very nice apartment for a guy living on a cop's salary. Late in season 13 [=McGee=] does some digging and learns that not only does Tony own the apartment outright but he bought it back when he was still a probationary agent and thus was not making much money. It turns out that Tony paid well below market price for the apartment since it was once the site of a gruesome triple homicide, after which nobody wanted to live there anymore. Tony was able to get the place cheap and put a grand piano on top of a large bloodstain that couldn't be completely cleaned. Tim then informs Tony that if Tony wanted to sell the apartment, enough time has passed since the murders that he is no longer legally required to inform potential buyers of its sordid history and thus could get full market value for it. In the following season, a subplot of one episode is the team quarreling over who gets to lease that apartment from Tony's dad after Tony leaves the team and the country. [[spoiler: Tim ends up with it, partially because he and his fiancee Deliah need the extra space.]] A season later, new agent Nick Torres laments that back when he did undercover work in South America, he could get a gorgeous apartment for $400 US a month. The cost of living in the DC Metro area is ''much'' higher.

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* In ''Just the Ten of Us'', the Lubbocks live in a house in Eureka, California that's big enough to comfortably house ten people. The parents are a Catholic school coach and a homemaker. Especially bad as a running theme is that the family is struggling financially. It's indicated that the school provided the family with the house. And even if not, it's also implied that it isn't the nicest of places--the places -- the four oldest sisters share an attic bedroom, son JR shares with his baby brother, and youngest daughter Sherry shares with her baby sister.
* Tony [=DiNozzo=] of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' lives in a very nice apartment for a guy living on a cop's salary. Late in season 13 Season 13, [=McGee=] does some digging and learns that not only does Tony own the apartment outright but he bought it back when he was still a probationary agent and thus was not making much money. It turns out that Tony paid well below market price for the apartment since it was once the site of a gruesome triple homicide, after which nobody wanted to live there anymore. Tony was able to get the place cheap and put a grand piano on top of a large bloodstain that couldn't be completely cleaned. Tim then informs Tony that if Tony wanted to sell the apartment, enough time has passed since the murders that he is no longer legally required to inform potential buyers of its sordid history and thus could get full market value for it. In the following season, a subplot of one episode is the team quarreling over who gets to lease that apartment from Tony's dad after Tony leaves the team and the country. [[spoiler: Tim ends up with it, partially because he and his fiancee Deliah need the extra space.]] A season later, new agent Nick Torres laments that back when he did undercover work in South America, he could get a gorgeous apartment for $400 US a month. The cost of living in the DC Metro area is ''much'' higher.



* ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' lampshades this in one episode, where Zelda alludes to the fact that the neighbours are suspicious that she and Hilda are able to afford such a fancy Victorian house in Massachusets - when Hilda is a struggling violinist and Zelda doesn't actually work until the fifth season. The aunts can afford whatever they want by having held onto various things over the centuries until they turn valuable.

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* ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' lampshades this in one episode, where Zelda alludes to the fact that the neighbours are suspicious that she and Hilda are able to afford such a fancy Victorian house in Massachusets - Massachusetts -- when Hilda is a struggling violinist and Zelda doesn't actually work until the fifth season. The aunts can afford whatever they want by having held onto various things over the centuries until they turn valuable.



* SpiritualSequel ''VideoGame/HeavyRain'' has the same problem with the apartments that are owned by Ethan (who's supposed to be a divorce dad falling on hard times) and Madison (a reporter who doesn't even seem to be working for one particular newspaper)--they're both absurdly spacious, though at least Ethan's apartment is bare.

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* SpiritualSequel ''VideoGame/HeavyRain'' has the same problem with the apartments that are owned by Ethan (who's supposed to be a divorce dad falling on hard times) and Madison (a reporter who doesn't even seem to be working for one particular newspaper)--they're newspaper) -- they're both absurdly spacious, though at least Ethan's apartment is bare.



* All of the safehouses used by Mike in ''VideoGame/AlphaProtocol'' are fairly expansive penthouses, save for the one in Taipei, which is a tiny, crappy apartment - until Mike uses the shower, which takes him downstairs into an ElaborateUndergroundBase that looks more like an intelligence command center than a safehouse, complete with a secret tunnel leading aboveground for his motorcycle. This is explained as part of the Alpha Protocol program, where agents establish safehouses using their own money and established bank accounts (and most of the resources used are not actually known by the agency to avoid tracing it back to Alpha Protocol - yay compartmentalizing!) Mike tends to {{lampshade|Hanging}} this, pointing out in Moscow how he appreciates where government spending is going while chilling in his massive, chic and ultramodern penthouse.

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* All of the safehouses used by Mike in ''VideoGame/AlphaProtocol'' are fairly expansive penthouses, save for the one in Taipei, which is a tiny, crappy apartment - -- until Mike uses the shower, which takes him downstairs into an ElaborateUndergroundBase that looks more like an intelligence command center than a safehouse, complete with a secret tunnel leading aboveground for his motorcycle. This is explained as part of the Alpha Protocol program, where agents establish safehouses using their own money and established bank accounts (and most of the resources used are not actually known by the agency to avoid tracing it back to Alpha Protocol - -- yay compartmentalizing!) Mike tends to {{lampshade|Hanging}} this, pointing out in Moscow how he appreciates where government spending is going while chilling in his massive, chic and ultramodern penthouse.



* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Doris owns a huge, spartan apartment in New York City -- and only pays $150 thanks to rent control. She tells Jay - without turning around -- to put the candlestick down, knowing he wanted to club her to take over her rent controlled apartment.

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* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic''. Doris owns a huge, spartan apartment in New York City -- and only pays $150 thanks to rent control. She tells Jay - -- without turning around -- to put the candlestick down, knowing he wanted to club her to take over her rent controlled apartment.



* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/MissionHill'': Andy is working at a water mattress store at (presumably) just above minimum wage, Posey is just...there, and no one knew what Jim did for a living until Kevin came along, yet they live in a very spacious apartment (with a second floor!) in a decent building with neighbours they like, in a part of town that doesn't seem run down or depressed. Then [[SecretlyWealthy Jim is revealed to be a highly paid corporate executive]] with tons of clout for basically being a computer whiz. This isn't revealed until Andy loses his job and a tooth, and Jim lets him use his health insurance to have it fixed, because [[YouNeverAsked Andy never asked]] - even though he's Jim's best and oldest friend.

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* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/MissionHill'': Andy is working at a water mattress store at (presumably) just above minimum wage, Posey is just...there, and no one knew what Jim did for a living until Kevin came along, yet they live in a very spacious apartment (with a second floor!) in a decent building with neighbours they like, in a part of town that doesn't seem run down or depressed. Then [[SecretlyWealthy Jim is revealed to be a highly paid corporate executive]] with tons of clout for basically being a computer whiz. This isn't revealed until Andy loses his job and a tooth, and Jim lets him use his health insurance to have it fixed, because [[YouNeverAsked Andy never asked]] - -- even though he's Jim's best and oldest friend.
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