History Main / FleetingDemographicRule

7th Apr '18 2:21:27 AM RedScharlach
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The original run of long-running (1954-93) weekly UK football comic ''RoyOfTheRovers'' was hit hard with this; the summer strips generally involved the Melchester Rovers team touring some South American country and getting kidnapped to keep the story exciting. Since Fleetway didn't think anyone would keep reading longer than three years, Roy was kidnapped five times in 10 years. This sort of thing was parodied in the ''ComicBook/{{Viz}}'' strip Billy the Fish.

to:

* The original run of long-running (1954-93) weekly UK football comic ''RoyOfTheRovers'' was hit hard with this; the summer strips generally involved the Melchester Rovers team touring some South American country and getting kidnapped to keep the story exciting. Since Fleetway didn't think anyone would keep reading longer than three years, Roy was kidnapped five times in 10 years. This sort of thing was parodied in the ''ComicBook/{{Viz}}'' strip Billy "Billy the Fish.Fish".



** Eventually the writers caved and Lana ''did'' become a superhero in her own right - Insect Queen. While this has since been retconned away, there is a current Insect Queen in the DC Universe...with the name of [[MythologyGag Lonna Leing]].

to:

** Eventually the writers caved and Lana ''did'' become a superhero in her own right - Insect Queen. While this has since been retconned away, there is a current Insect Queen in the DC Universe... with the name of [[MythologyGag Lonna Leing]].



** How many times has Apocalypse created a four horsemen team, posing a great threat to the world, only to be forgotten later?

to:

** How many times has Apocalypse created a four horsemen four-horsemen team, posing a great threat to the world, only to be forgotten later?



** Every iteration of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' does ''Literature/MobyDick''. Plus ''three'' movies as well - Khan with Kirk as the whale and in ''First Contact'', Picard has the Borg as his whale. ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'' flips the script by having Kirk with Khan as the whale ([[spoiler: and after Kirk's apparant death, Spock with Khan as the whale]]) Note that [[LampshadeHanging all three compare the situation to Moby Dick]]. Stewart actually played Ahab two years after ''First Contact'' in the Disney version of ''Moby Dick''.

to:

** Every iteration of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' does ''Literature/MobyDick''. Plus ''three'' movies as well - Khan with Kirk as the whale and in ''First Contact'', Picard has the Borg as his whale. ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'' flips the script by having Kirk with Khan as the whale ([[spoiler: and after Kirk's apparant apparent death, Spock with Khan as the whale]]) Note that [[LampshadeHanging all three compare the situation to Moby Dick]]. Stewart actually played Ahab two years after ''First Contact'' in the Disney version of ''Moby Dick''.
31st Mar '18 8:51:45 AM SparkPlugTheTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A related version happens in TV made for toddlers. In the cases of ''InTheNightGarden'', only 100 episodes were ever commissioned, despite the show being wildly popular. The logic is that the demographic will only watch for two years then grow out of the show, meaning after 100 episodes you can start from the beginning again and nobody but adults will notice. This is also the reason why the show has no overarching plot or an [[TheResolutionWillNotBeIdentified episode that acknowledges itself as the first or last]].

to:

* A related version happens in TV made for toddlers. In the cases case of ''InTheNightGarden'', ''Series/InTheNightGarden'', only 100 episodes were ever commissioned, despite the show being wildly popular. The logic is that the demographic will only watch for two years then grow out of the show, meaning after 100 episodes you can start from the beginning again and nobody but adults will notice. This is also the reason why the show has no overarching plot or an [[TheResolutionWillNotBeIdentified episode that acknowledges itself as the first or last]].
28th Mar '18 4:12:59 PM Ninamarie124
Is there an issue? Send a Message
26th Mar '18 9:31:40 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Comicbook/[[AntMan Hank Pym]] and the Avengers face Comicbook/{{Ultron}}. Ultron is seemingly destroyed, only to return in a new form.

to:

** Comicbook/[[AntMan [[Comicbook/AntMan Hank Pym]] and the Avengers face Comicbook/{{Ultron}}. Ultron is seemingly destroyed, only to return in a new form.
26th Mar '18 9:31:01 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Many popular superheroes have been [[LegacyCharacter temporarily replaced]] by other characters multiple times:
** Azrael briefly became the new Comicbook/{{Batman}} after Bruce Wayne was crippled during the ''Comicbook/{{Knightfall}}'' storyline in TheNineties. Then, after Bruce was presumed dead following ''[[Comicbook/GrantMorrisonsBatman Batman R.I.P.]]'' and ''Comicbook/FinalCrisis'' in 2009, [[Comicbook/{{Nightwing}} Dick Grayson]] and Damian Wayne took over as the new Batman and Robin. Finally, after Bruce was rendered amnesiac after the 2014 ''Comicbook/BatmanEndgame'' storyline, James Gordon took on the Batman mantle to protect Gotham in the hero's absence.
** In TheSeventies, Diana lost the Comicbook/WonderWoman identity to a redheaded Amazon named Orana after being defeated by her in a ceremonial tournament. She would later reclaim the identity after Orana was killed. Then, in TheNineties, Diana lost her mantle to ''another'' redheaded Amazon, Artemis, before once again regaining it after her successor's demise.
** In 1983, James "Rhodey" Rhodes became the new Comicbook/IronMan after Tony Stark relapsed into alcoholism, and even fought in the ''Comicbook/SecretWars'' and became a founding member of the [[WestCoastTeam West Coast Avengers]]. Then, after Tony was thought dead in TheNineties, Rhodey took over the Iron Man identity once more, and later became Comicbook/WarMachine after Tony returned. Rhodey then became Iron Man for a third time after Tony was forced to temporarily retire following the 2011 ''Comicbook/FearItself'' crossover. When Tony was rendered comatose at the close of 2016's ''Comicbook/CivilWarII'', his legacy was briefly carried on by both [[Comicbook/{{Ironheart}} Riri Williams]] (in ''Invincible Iron Man'') and [[Comicbook/DoctorDoom Victor Von Doom]] (in ''Infamous Iron Man'').
** In 1987, John Walker was chosen as the new Comicbook/CaptainAmerica after Steve Rogers chose to give up the identity rather than be a government stooge. After Steve was killed in 2007-2008's ''Comicbook/TheDeathOfCaptainAmerica'', his former sidekick Comicbook/BuckyBarnes became the new Captain America for a time, and even joined the Comicbook/NewAvengers. In 2014, Steve was forced to step back after having the Super Soldier Serum drained from his body, which led to [[Comicbook/TheFalcon Sam Wilson]] taking on the Captain America identity in his stead.
** In TheNineties, a mortal named Eric Masterson was made the new [[Comicbook/TheMightyThor Thor]] after the original was banished by Odin. Then, in 2011 (following the aforementioned ''Fear Itself''), Thor was again replaced, this time by his old enemy Ulik, who took the name Tanarus and became the new god of thunder. Finally, in 2014, Thor became unworthy and lost the ability to lift Mjolnir after the events of ''Comicbook/OriginalSin'', leading to the moral Jane Foster [[Comicbook/{{Thor 2014}} becoming the new Thor]] after lifting the hammer.
** Hal Jordan has either lost or voluntarily given up his status as a Comicbook/GreenLantern several times now, with his role as Earth's primary GL usually taken up by one of his pals like John Stewart or Kyle Rayner.
** The Comicbook/BlackPanther identity was taken over by a young man named Kasper Cole in 2002, after T'Challa disappeared. In 2009, Princess Shuri became the new Black Panther after T'Challa was badly wounded in a plot by Doctor Doom.



** Hank Pym and the Avengers face Ultron. Ultron is seemingly destroyed, only to return in a new form.
** The Vision is dismantled or destroyed.

to:

** Comicbook/[[AntMan Hank Pym Pym]] and the Avengers face Ultron.Comicbook/{{Ultron}}. Ultron is seemingly destroyed, only to return in a new form.
** The Vision Comicbook/TheVision is dismantled or destroyed.destroyed. Alternatively, Vision and Comicbook/ScarletWitch have relationship troubles or pine for one another despite dating other people. Vision losing and then regaining his capacity to experience emotions has also happened several times now.



* It's a near-universal constant that every flagship ''[[Comicbook/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]]'' run will gradually phase out the bigger name characters (Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Comicbook/TheFlash and Comicbook/{{Aquaman}}) in favor of a lineup primarily consisting of lesser known heroes, only for the A-listers to retake center stage after the series is cancelled and relaunched.



** Sam Wilson became the official Captain America in ''Captain America: Sam Wilson''. In ''ComicBook/NickSpencersCaptainAmerica'', Steve Rogers is back to normal and resumes being Captain America. Now both are Captain America.

to:

** Sam Wilson became the official Captain America in ''Captain America: Sam Wilson''. In ''ComicBook/NickSpencersCaptainAmerica'', Steve Rogers is back to normal and resumes being Captain America. Now both are Captain America.America, with Sam officially going becoming the Falcon again after ''Comicbook/SecretEmpire''.



*** And for Sisko and Janeway, we had "For the Uniform" (although the characters in this episode reference ''Literature/LesMiserables'') and "Equinox" respectively, both of which involved renegade Starfleet officers. The first instance of a ''Moby Dick'' plot was seen as far back as 1967's "The Doomsday Machine" and "Obsession."

to:

*** And for Sisko and Janeway, we had "For the Uniform" (although the characters in this episode reference ''Literature/LesMiserables'') LesMiserables) and "Equinox" respectively, both of which involved renegade Starfleet officers. The first instance of a ''Moby Dick'' plot was seen as far back as 1967's "The Doomsday Machine" and "Obsession."
26th Mar '18 9:13:18 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** And for Sisko and Janeway, we had "For the Uniform" (although the characters in this episode reference LesMiserables) and "Equinox" respectively, both of which involved renegade Starfleet officers. The first instance of a ''Moby Dick'' plot was seen as far back as 1967's "The Doomsday Machine" and "Obsession."

to:

*** And for Sisko and Janeway, we had "For the Uniform" (although the characters in this episode reference LesMiserables) ''Literature/LesMiserables'') and "Equinox" respectively, both of which involved renegade Starfleet officers. The first instance of a ''Moby Dick'' plot was seen as far back as 1967's "The Doomsday Machine" and "Obsession."
19th Mar '18 5:38:03 AM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Often found in ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' shorts in remakes, like Back Alley Oproar and Notes to You both featuring a gag where Sylvester the cat singing while one of the other characters is trying to sleep. Others include the XylophoneGag, the shooting gallery gag (where one character takes a mischievous child character to a shooting gallery, and the kid makes it seem like the shooter is shooting the barker in the head), and the powder room gag (where Bugs throws a match into a room with gunpowder, and Sam refuses to go get it after the third time, resulting in a big kablooey).

to:

** Often found in ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' shorts in remakes, like Back Alley Oproar WesternAnimation/BackAlleyOproar and Notes to You WesternAnimation/NotesToYou both featuring a gag where Sylvester the cat singing while one of the other characters is trying to sleep. Others include the XylophoneGag, the shooting gallery gag (where one character takes a mischievous child character to a shooting gallery, and the kid makes it seem like the shooter is shooting the barker in the head), and the powder room gag (where Bugs throws a match into a room with gunpowder, and Sam refuses to go get it after the third time, resulting in a big kablooey).
12th Mar '18 9:04:52 AM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


{{Lampshading}} of this practice falls under DidntWeUseThisJokeAlready.

to:

{{Lampshading}} {{Lampshad|eHanging}}ing of this practice falls under DidntWeUseThisJokeAlready.



** Probably the most obvious is that (starting with Hoenn for females, and Unova for males) every time Ash goes to a new region, he meets new people who will soon be [[GuestStarPartyMember his new traveling companions]]. In Hoenn and Sinnoh, Pikachu will accidentally destroy the female companion's bicycle,[[note]]At least (although [[TagAlongKid Bonnie]] does still get shocked just like Iris did). In Alola, this tradition is discarded entirely.[[/note]] mirroring the beginning of the first season.
** Starting with Hoenn, the writers also employ the BagOfSpilling by having Ash drop off all of his Pokemon (save Pikachu[[note]]and Aipom for Sinnoh, but only because she followed him[[/note]]) to train new monsters.[[note]]Externally justified through the various trade restrictions [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver between]] [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire the]] [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl gener]][[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite ations]]; from that perspective, ''Johto'' is the outlier.[[/note]] Except that Pikachu ''always'' suffers from LevelDrain just afterwards.[[note]]In Hoenn, the cause was a big magnet piloted by Team Rocket. Unova, on the other hand, sees Pikachu getting overloaded by the new Legendary Pokémon Zekrom unable to use electric attacks. He recovered them later, although Pikachu still inexplicably loses to low-leveled Pokémon from time to time, including the starter Pokémon of a rival who had ''just picked it up'' from Professor Juniper. Sinnoh, Kalos, and Alola didn't have explanations for Pikachu's weakening at all.[[/note]]

to:

** Probably the most obvious is that (starting with Hoenn for females, and Unova for males) every time Ash goes to a new region, he meets new people who will soon be [[GuestStarPartyMember his new traveling companions]]. In Hoenn companions]], and Sinnoh, Pikachu will accidentally destroy the female companion's bicycle,[[note]]At least (although [[TagAlongKid Bonnie]] does still get shocked just like Iris did). In bicycle,[[note]]Although for Alola, this tradition is has been discarded entirely.[[/note]] mirroring the beginning of the first season.
** Starting with Hoenn, the writers also employ the BagOfSpilling by having Ash drop off all of his Pokemon (save Pikachu[[note]]and Aipom for Sinnoh, but only because she followed him[[/note]]) to train new monsters.[[note]]Externally justified through the various trade restrictions [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver between]] [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire the]] [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl gener]][[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite ations]]; from that perspective, ''Johto'' is the outlier.[[/note]] Except that Pikachu ''always'' suffers from LevelDrain just afterwards.[[note]]In Hoenn, the cause was a big magnet piloted by Team Rocket. Unova, on the other hand, Rocket, while Unova sees Pikachu getting overloaded by the new Legendary Pokémon Zekrom unable to use electric attacks. He recovered them later, although Pikachu still inexplicably loses to low-leveled Pokémon from time to time, including the starter Pokémon of a rival who had ''just picked it up'' from Professor Juniper. Sinnoh, Kalos, and Alola didn't have explanations for Pikachu's weakening at all.[[/note]]



** This is thought to be why the Mewtwo in ''Anime/PokemonGenesectAndTheLegendAwakened'' is a new character, instead of the one from ''Anime/PokemonTheFirstMovie'' and ''Anime/PokemonMewtwoReturns''...which ended up being something of a misfire, since TV channels ended up airing those films as part of the hype for the movie coming out, meaning that new child audiences ''would'' be familiar with the original Mewtwo!
** While it didn't happened in ''Pokémon XY'', and has not happened yet in ''SM'', every new generation of companions (Misty & Brock/Tracey, May & Max, Dawn, Iris & Cilan) has featured an episode where most of the cast and/or their Pokemon ends up getting afflicted by Stun Spore, leaving them paralyzed. It would come down to the remaining cast to seek out a type of plant that grows at the bottom of a lake in order to cure them. This would always involve a water-type Pokemon either joining the cast or overcoming one of its own problems... Or both, in the case of ''Black & White''.

to:

** This is thought to be why the Mewtwo in ''Anime/PokemonGenesectAndTheLegendAwakened'' is a new character, instead of the one from ''Anime/PokemonTheFirstMovie'' and ''Anime/PokemonMewtwoReturns''...''Anime/PokemonMewtwoReturns'', both of which originally released/aired more than a decade before... which ended up being something of a misfire, since TV channels ended up airing those films as part of the hype for the movie coming out, meaning that new child audiences ''would'' be familiar with the original Mewtwo!
** While it didn't happened happen in ''Pokémon XY'', and has not happened yet in ''SM'', every new generation of companions (Misty & Brock/Tracey, May & Max, Dawn, Iris & Cilan) has featured an episode where most of the cast and/or their Pokemon ends up getting afflicted by Stun Spore, leaving them paralyzed. It would come down to the remaining cast to seek out a type of plant that grows at the bottom of a lake in order to cure them. This would always involve a water-type Pokemon either joining the cast or overcoming one of its own problems... Or both, in the case of ''Black & White''.



** In some more specific examples, the ''Diamond & Pearl'' series reused individual plots. ''Pika and Goliath'' retreaded ''Electrick Shock Showdown'' (though it at least also had flashbacks to said episode) and established for the new audience why Pikachu wouldn't evolve. ''Crossing Paths'', ''Cottonee in Love'', ''Butterfree and Me'', and ''To Catch a Pokémon Smuggler'' were ''Bye Bye Butterfree'' but starring Jessie's Dustox, a wild Cottonee, ''another'' Butterfree, and a wild Vivillon respectively.
** When Misty and Brock, Ash's two original companions and without a doubt the most recognizable of the human cast except for him, reappeared in ''Sun and Moon'' the anime had to reintroduce them. This is because neither had appeared in almost ten years and (assuming they don't watch reruns or didn't play either ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver HGSS]]'' or ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 BW2]]'') the current demographic doesn't remember who they are.

to:

** In some more specific examples, the ''Diamond & Pearl'' series reused individual plots. ''Pika and Goliath'' retreaded ''Electrick ''Electric Shock Showdown'' (though it at least also had flashbacks to said episode) and established for the new audience why Pikachu wouldn't evolve. ''Crossing Paths'', ''Cottonee in Love'', ''Butterfree and Me'', and ''To Catch a Pokémon Smuggler'' were ''Bye Bye Butterfree'' but starring Jessie's Dustox, a wild Cottonee, ''another'' Butterfree, and a wild Vivillon respectively.
** When Misty and Brock, Ash's two original companions and without a doubt the most recognizable of the human cast except for him, reappeared in ''Sun and Moon'' Moon'', the anime had to reintroduce them. This is because neither had appeared in almost ten years and (assuming they don't watch reruns or didn't play either ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver HGSS]]'' or ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 BW2]]'') the current demographic doesn't remember who they are.



** Also ''ComicBook/HouseOfM''. ''How'' many times have the heroes woken up one morning to see [[RealityWarper reality has been changed drastically]] and they need to fix it? Enough that Cap and Hawkeye's reaction back in "The Morgan Conquest" was basically, "Not again!"

to:

** Also ''ComicBook/HouseOfM''. ''How'' many times have the heroes woken up one morning to see [[RealityWarper reality has been changed drastically]] and they need to fix it? Enough that Cap and Hawkeye's reaction back in "The Morgan Conquest" was basically, "Not again!""[[HereWeGoAgain Not again!]]"



** This is at least in part because of [[MyRealDaddy Marv Wolfman's]] immense success with the 'New Teen Titans', which was at the time DC's best selling and most highly acclaimed title for a good while. Many storylines attempt to ape the success of his, with some success and some....not so much success at times.
** Not just Raven. If it's Wednesday, there's a good chance they'll be fighting [[PsychoRangers a group of evil Titans]]. Or one of them will die. Also count the number of stories where Comicbook/{{Cyborg}} angsts about being a machine, only to eventually come to terms with his appearance.

to:

** This is at least in part because of [[MyRealDaddy Marv Wolfman's]] immense success with the 'New Teen Titans', which was at the time DC's best selling and most highly acclaimed title for a good while. Many storylines attempt to ape the success of his, with some success and some....some... not so much success at times.
** Not just Raven. If it's Wednesday, there's a good chance they'll be fighting [[PsychoRangers a group of evil Titans]]. Or one of them will die. Also count the number of stories where Comicbook/{{Cyborg}} angsts about being a machine, only to eventually come to terms with his appearance.appearance until the next time.



* ''Franchise/XMen'' as an entire franchise has arguably been doing this since 1991. Whatever changes are made to characters, most last five or so years before going back to the [[MyRealDaddy status quo that Chris Claremont had before he left the book]]. It's notable that Claremont ''himself'' did not subscribe to this, and things kept changing constantly during his run, and never went completely back to normal most of the time. Apparently, it never occurs to Marvel that this might be ''why'' the Claremont years are looked upon as the golden era of ''ComicBook/XMen'' comics.
** Recent examples include ''ComicBook/HouseOfM'', where at the end the X-Men status quo was changed by Mutants going from a prominent minority with their own sub-culture to being on the verge of extinction when the ComicBook/ScarletWitch [[AWizardDidIt wished away the powers of most other mutants]] in ''2005'' and '''Seven Years Later''' the whole thing was undone with the crossover event ''[[Comicbook/AvengersVsXMen AVX]]''.

to:

* ''Franchise/XMen'' as an entire franchise has arguably been doing this since 1991. Whatever changes are made to characters, most last five or so years before going back to the [[MyRealDaddy status quo that Chris Claremont had set before he left the book]]. It's notable that Claremont ''himself'' did not subscribe to this, and things kept changing constantly during his run, and never went completely back to normal most of the time. Apparently, it never occurs to Marvel that this might be ''why'' the Claremont years are looked upon as the golden era of ''ComicBook/XMen'' comics.
** Recent examples include ''ComicBook/HouseOfM'', where at the end the X-Men status quo was changed by Mutants going from a prominent minority with their own sub-culture to being on the verge of extinction when the ComicBook/ScarletWitch [[AWizardDidIt wished away the powers of most other mutants]] in ''2005'' ''2005'', and '''Seven Years Later''' '''seven years later''' the whole thing was undone with the crossover event ''[[Comicbook/AvengersVsXMen AVX]]''.



** Daniel Craig is not the first new Bond to be DarkerAndEdgier. A general rule of thumb is that Bond switches between being camp and being serious each time they change actors.

to:

** Daniel Craig Creator/DanielCraig is not the first new Bond to be DarkerAndEdgier. A general rule of thumb is that Bond switches between being camp (Creator/SeanConnery, Creator/RogerMoore, and Creator/PierceBrosnan) and being serious (Creator/GeorgeLazenby, Creator/TimothyDalton, and Craig) each time they change actors.



In another episode, a ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}} TOS'' obsessed EnergyBeing forces the Planet Express crew and the TOS cast to fight to the death. When asked where he got that "idiotic idea", the alien rattles off the numbers of ''four'' TOS episodes where that happened (and Fry adds one he missed, much to the alien's chagrin).

to:

In another episode, a ''Series/{{Star Trek|The Original Series}} TOS'' obsessed TOS''-obsessed EnergyBeing forces the Planet Express crew and the TOS cast to fight to the death. When asked where he got that "idiotic idea", the alien rattles off the numbers of ''four'' TOS episodes where that happened (and Fry adds one he missed, much to the alien's chagrin).



---> '''Worf:''' We were like warriors from the ancient sagas. There was nothing we could not do.
---> '''O'Brien:''' Except keep the holodecks working right.

to:

---> '''Worf:''' We were like warriors from the ancient sagas. There was nothing we could not do.
--->
do.\\
'''O'Brien:''' Except keep the holodecks working right.
28th Feb '18 12:55:13 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message
28th Feb '18 12:55:12 PM comicwriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A storyline where the current line-up of Avengers are decimated, with a few members of the team even dying, in order to set up a more high-profile roster under a new creative team. Did I just describe Creator/WaltSimonson's lead-up to ''Comicbook/{{Inferno}}'' (1988), Creator/BrianBendis' ''Comicbook/AvengersDisassembled'' (2004), or Creator/MarkWaid, Creator/AwlEwing and Jim Zub's ''Comicbook/AvengersNoSurrender'' (2018)?

to:

** A storyline where the current line-up of Avengers are decimated, with a few members of the team even dying, in order to set up a more high-profile roster under a new creative team. Did I just describe Creator/WaltSimonson's lead-up to ''Comicbook/{{Inferno}}'' (1988), Creator/BrianBendis' ''Comicbook/AvengersDisassembled'' (2004), or Creator/MarkWaid, Creator/AwlEwing Creator/AlEwing and Jim Zub's ''Comicbook/AvengersNoSurrender'' (2018)?
This list shows the last 10 events of 457. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FleetingDemographicRule