History Main / FetchQuest

3rd Dec '17 5:44:12 PM Saber15
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* Though all the [[VideoGame/{{X}} X-Universe]] games have the normal variety of Fetch Quests (typically it's "pick up a delivery" or "gather up some materials from wherever"), ''X3: Terran Conflict'' ups the ante with a Fetch ''Plot''. [[spoiler:To repair the Hub, a control center for the game's PortalNetwork, Mahi Ma will have you gather (in chronological order) 400 computer components, 500 [[CommonplaceRare microchips]], 10,000 energy cells, 150,000 teladianium (a ceramic used for structural components), 450,000 ore, 500 [[ProductPlacement nividium]], 250,000 crystals, 15 million [[WeWillSpendCreditsInTheFuture credits]] (to pay a Paranid scientist for his help), 400,000 silicon wafers, and 75,000 more microchips.]] Finishing the plot in a timely fashion (as in, less than ''several months'' in RealLife) requires the player to build his own infrastructure to supply the materials. The good news is, the [[spoiler:Hub]] is an extremely useful structure [[spoiler:able to arbitrarily connect up to three jumpgate pairs through its sector]], and the infrastructure you build to repair it will make ludicrous amounts of money afterwards.

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* Though all the [[VideoGame/{{X}} X-Universe]] games have the normal variety of Fetch Quests (typically it's "pick up a delivery" or "gather up some materials from wherever"), ''X3: Terran Conflict'' ups the ante with a Fetch ''Plot''. [[spoiler:To repair the Hub, a control center for the game's PortalNetwork, Mahi Ma will have you gather (in chronological order) 400 computer components, 500 [[CommonplaceRare microchips]], 10,000 energy cells, 150,000 teladianium (a ceramic used for structural components), 450,000 ore, 500 [[ProductPlacement nividium]], 250,000 crystals, 15 million [[WeWillSpendCreditsInTheFuture credits]] (to pay a Paranid scientist for his help), 400,000 silicon wafers, and 75,000 more microchips.]] Finishing the plot in a timely fashion (as in, less than ''several months'' in RealLife) requires the player to build his own infrastructure to supply the materials. The good news is, the [[spoiler:Hub]] is an extremely useful structure [[spoiler:able to arbitrarily connect up to three jumpgate pairs through its sector]], and the infrastructure you build to repair it will make ludicrous amounts of money afterwards.
afterwards. The absurd quantities are lampshaded in the ExpansionPack, with the the quest giver noting that there's a cargo hold full of literally thousands of computer parts.
28th Nov '17 4:19:04 PM Pichu-kun
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* 60% of ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' is nothing but long, drawn out, randomly generated fetch quest where someone borrowed something, and lent it to someone and then someone stole it from them, etc. Which leads you through almost everyone into the village to get someone's [random Nintendo product] back in exchange for the original guy to give you some throwaway carpet or piece of furniture that you probably didn't want to begin with.
** Thankfully toned down in the sequels, which now only has you go from person A, to person B, then back to person A with the item in tow.
* In ''VideoGame/TheSims Bustin' Out'' for the GBA, some quests have you involve grabbing something like an urn to give to a ghost in order to proceed. You can also ask others for an errand, and upon completion, you get a bit of money. Helpful when you begin the game and have little cash, but next to useless later, because you get better jobs eventually.
* Many quests in ''VideoGame/TheSimsMedieval'' have "get Object X" as a step. Sometimes Object X can be acquired in the village shop, but often the Sim will have to harvest it or obtain it from an NPC.

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* 60% of ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' is nothing but long, drawn out, randomly generated fetch quest where someone borrowed something, and lent it to someone and then someone stole it from them, etc. Which leads you through almost everyone into the village to get someone's [random Nintendo product] back in exchange for the original guy to give you some throwaway carpet or piece of furniture that you probably didn't want to begin with.
**
with. Thankfully toned down in the sequels, which now only has you go from person A, to person B, then back to person A with the item in tow.
* ''VideoGame/TheSims'':
**
In ''VideoGame/TheSims Bustin' Out'' ''VideoGame/TheSimsBustinOut'' for the GBA, some quests have you involve grabbing something like an urn to give to a ghost in order to proceed. You can also ask others for an errand, and upon completion, you get a bit of money. Helpful when you begin the game and have little cash, but next to useless later, because you get better jobs eventually.
* ** Many quests in ''VideoGame/TheSimsMedieval'' have "get Object X" as a step. Sometimes Object X can be acquired in the village shop, but often the Sim will have to harvest it or obtain it from an NPC.
15th Sep '17 8:41:36 PM nombretomado
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* The 1989 {{Macintosh}} RPG ''VideoGame/TaskMaker'' is nothing ''but'' a fetch-quest.

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* The 1989 {{Macintosh}} UsefulNotes/{{Macintosh}} RPG ''VideoGame/TaskMaker'' is nothing ''but'' a fetch-quest.
9th Sep '17 5:27:12 PM nombretomado
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* In ''[[BackyardSports Backyard Skateboarding]]'', you must find the key to Shark Belly Shores in the Boardwalk before beating the Tour Guide Challenge, which unlocks the next level.

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* In ''[[BackyardSports ''[[VideoGame/BackyardSports Backyard Skateboarding]]'', you must find the key to Shark Belly Shores in the Boardwalk before beating the Tour Guide Challenge, which unlocks the next level.
28th Jul '17 11:46:19 AM gophergiggles
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Added DiffLines:

** Twilight Town and Creepy Steeple. For starters you must go to Frankly, then to the entrance pipe, then back to Frankly, then back to the pipe just to enter. Then you must go to the elder, to the gate, back to the elder, and back to the gate to leave Twilight Town. Then you must go to the fallen tree, back to the shop, and back to the fallen tree to get past. Then you must go to Creepy Steeple, then back to town, then back to Creepy Steeple, then back to town, then back to Creepy Steeple. It's 99% pointless back and forth "fetch the stick" kind of game play and, if it wasn't for the cool scenery and [[EnsembleDarkHorse fan-favorite]] [[TheCutie Vivian]] joining your party here, it would likely be reviled as ThatOneLevel.
17th Jun '17 1:10:08 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/EternalSonata'' has a maddening example involving a key needed to open a temple. The key is part of a much longer trading sidequest throughout the game, though you don't actually have to participate in the full sidequest in order to get it, and doing so only results in getting an extra accessory of the player's choice. The maddening part is that after you get the key, the temple turns out to be ''unlocked'', at least in the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 UpdatedRerelease anyway. In the XBox360 version, it was played straight, but in the Rerelease, when the party gets to the temple and actually tries to use the key, they find that the door is unlocked. Yet the game still makes you get the key anyway, because if you try to use the door before having obtained the key, it ''is'' locked!

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* ''VideoGame/EternalSonata'' has a maddening example involving a key needed to open a temple. The key is part of a much longer trading sidequest throughout the game, though you don't actually have to participate in the full sidequest in order to get it, and doing so only results in getting an extra accessory of the player's choice. The maddening part is that after you get the key, the temple turns out to be ''unlocked'', at least in the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 UpdatedRerelease anyway. In the XBox360 UsefulNotes/XBox360 version, it was played straight, but in the Rerelease, when the party gets to the temple and actually tries to use the key, they find that the door is unlocked. Yet the game still makes you get the key anyway, because if you try to use the door before having obtained the key, it ''is'' locked!
24th May '17 12:32:31 PM HighCrate
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* The ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' DS re-release has a new optional dungeon which is ''nothing but fetch quests''. One particularly {{Egregious}} example, towards the end of the dungeon, is a fetch quest that requires you to traverse one dungeon (getting into three battles you can't avoid), then leave the dungeon, then go back through the dungeon, then leave the dungeon, then go back through the dungeon, then leave the dungeon, [[OverlyLongGag then go back through the dungeon]]...It reaches the breaking point when, for this ''one fetch quest'', you become GenreSavvy and realize that the first item you grab is not going to be the item that was requested, but looking for the right item is ''impossible'' until you're told that the one you have is the ''wrong'' item. And then, because once isn't enough, the game does the ''exact same thing'' immediately afterwards. If Magus is in your party at a certain point during the quest, he'll state the current trope quote. It's as though the developers that made this quest knew about the repetitiveness, making Magus ''[[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] about how ridiculous the whole thing is'', yet [[TrollingCreator kept it as is anyway]].

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* The ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' DS re-release has a new optional dungeon which is ''nothing but fetch quests''. One particularly {{Egregious}} example, towards the end of the dungeon, is a fetch quest that requires you to traverse one dungeon (getting into three battles you can't avoid), then leave the dungeon, then go back through the dungeon, then leave the dungeon, then go back through the dungeon, then leave the dungeon, [[OverlyLongGag then go back through the dungeon]]...It reaches the breaking point when, for this ''one fetch quest'', you become GenreSavvy and realize that the first item you grab is not going to be the item that was requested, but looking for the right item is ''impossible'' until you're told that the one you have is the ''wrong'' item. And then, because once isn't enough, the game does the ''exact same thing'' immediately afterwards. If Magus is in your party at a certain point during the quest, he'll state the current trope quote. It's as though the developers that made this quest knew about the repetitiveness, making Magus ''[[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] about how ridiculous the whole thing is'', yet [[TrollingCreator kept it as is anyway]].
2nd May '17 11:46:34 PM shooterboss
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* ''VideoGame/OlloInTheSunnyValleyFair'' has the titular character bring over gardening supplies for growing a tomato.
30th Apr '17 2:03:00 PM nombretomado
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* ''HarvestMoon: The Tale of Two Towns'' has a "requests board" in both towns, with several classes of requests ranging in rarity, quantity and quality of the items requested. Anything "B Class" and above is a LuckBasedMission, as villagers will often ask for items that aren't in season, can only be procured under special circumstances or that you simply aren't able to manufacture yet. Presumably, you're supposed to use the Wi-Fi connection to try and trade for such items.

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* ''HarvestMoon: The Tale of Two Towns'' ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonTheTaleOfTwoTowns'' has a "requests board" in both towns, with several classes of requests ranging in rarity, quantity and quality of the items requested. Anything "B Class" and above is a LuckBasedMission, as villagers will often ask for items that aren't in season, can only be procured under special circumstances or that you simply aren't able to manufacture yet. Presumably, you're supposed to use the Wi-Fi connection to try and trade for such items.
19th Apr '17 7:50:43 AM BeerBaron
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* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'':
** The game includes several, such as retrieving the Amulet of Kings after the monk loses it (mandatory) or collecting various ingredients for a witch to brew a Cure for Vampirism (optional). Fetch quests are more common in [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]], which is full of alchemists who can't be bothered to gather their own ingredients and wizards who would rather wait around for a PC to show up and ask for work than go to the bookstore themselves.
** There's also the quest "Finding Your Roots", where you have to go around finding a very rare plant called Nirnroot to give to a guy who makes it into increasingly potent batches of a potion. There are over 350 placed in the game, usually near water, and you need one hundred of them to fully complete the quest. This one is best done by picking them up as you're doing other things.
** Played with in the Fighters Guild quest "Amelion's Debt": you can save a family from bankruptcy by retrieving their ancestor's valuable armour from a haunted tomb... or by giving them some money, in which case you bemuse your Guild superior but pass the quest with no complications.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim'':
** The Radiant Quest system consists of a large amount of fetch quests, particularly the mini-quests given by the Thieves' Guild and the Companions (which are largely "go here, kill/rob X, bring back sword/necklace/gold statue/etc. to quest-giver"). There is also the "No Stone Unturned" quest, which sends you seeking the stones of Barenziah all over Skyrim, and the "A Return to Your Roots" quest, which is a retread of the above "Finding Your Roots" quest from ''Oblivion'', though at least this time you're collecting crimson nirnroot in one giant cavern instead of all over the world map.
** "No Stone Unturned" is considered by many to be the [[ThatOneSidequest most infamous]] of all Skyrim fetch quests, if not all quests in general. The stones are quite small and almost always hidden away in some nondescript dungeon or sitting on a desk in a some random NPC's house amongst various bits of junk. And once you pick up a stone it can't be removed from your inventory until you've found all 24 of them and completed the associated quest, which is a problem since the stones each have a 0.5 weight value (most other quest items are weightless). Worse still, one of the stones was placed in a spot that becomes completely inaccessible after a certain point, rendering it {{Permanently Missable|Content}}. Until the stone was moved by the 1.4 patch, it wasn't uncommon for players to reach the end of the game with up to 11.5 pounds of dead weight taking up space in their inventory. And unlike most quests in the game. You don't get map markers for them. So you have to travel the entire country completely blind searching every single nook&cranny in the ENTIRE game. Unless you use a walk through, or a map marker mod. [[note]] the map marker mod for the stones is one of the highest rated Skyrim mods on the Steam Workshop [[/note]]

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* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'':
''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** The series includes plenty of these throughout. ''Usually'' the quest giver offers a reason why they can't just fetch the item(s) themself, but not always. Specific examples from the games are below.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'':
*** Your very first assignment in the main quest is to fetch a [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Dwemer]] cube from Dwemer ruin. The quest giver has information you need, and he considers fetching the item to be part of your payment.
*** The Apprentice-level quests for the Mages Guild are a particularly flagrant case. Ajira, the Balmora Mages Guild hall resident Alchemist, sends you off to collect samples of native mushrooms and flowers for her research. (If one then reads her research notes, she claims to have worked hard to gather ingredients for her experiments, [[StealingTheCredit even though itís actually you who went out and gathered them]].)
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'':
***
The game includes several, such as retrieving the Amulet of Kings after the monk loses it (mandatory) or collecting various ingredients for a witch to brew a Cure for Vampirism (optional). Fetch quests are more common in [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]], which is full of alchemists who can't be bothered to gather their own ingredients and wizards who would rather wait around for a PC to show up and ask for work than go to the bookstore themselves.
**
(optional).
***
There's also the quest "Finding Your Roots", where you have to go around finding a very rare plant called Nirnroot to give to a guy who makes it into increasingly potent batches of a potion. There are over 350 placed in the game, usually near water, and you need one hundred of them to fully complete the quest. This one is best done by picking them up as you're doing other things.
** *** Played with in the Fighters Guild quest "Amelion's Debt": you can save a family from bankruptcy by retrieving their ancestor's valuable armour from a haunted tomb... or by giving them some money, in which case you bemuse your Guild superior but pass the quest with no complications.
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim'':
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'':
***
The Radiant Quest system consists of a large amount of fetch quests, particularly the mini-quests given by the Thieves' Guild and the Companions (which are largely "go here, kill/rob X, bring back sword/necklace/gold statue/etc. to quest-giver"). There is also the "No Stone Unturned" quest, which sends you seeking the stones of Barenziah all over Skyrim, and the "A Return to Your Roots" quest, which is a retread of the above "Finding Your Roots" quest from ''Oblivion'', though at least this time you're collecting crimson nirnroot in one giant cavern instead of all over the world map.
** *** "No Stone Unturned" is considered by many to be the [[ThatOneSidequest most infamous]] of all Skyrim fetch quests, if not all quests in general. The stones are [[CollectionSidequest numerous]], quite small small, and almost always hidden away in some nondescript dungeon or sitting on a desk in a some random NPC's house amongst various bits of junk. And once you pick up a stone it can't be removed from your inventory until you've found all 24 of them and completed the associated quest, which is a problem since the stones each have a 0.5 weight value (most other quest items are weightless). Worse still, one of the stones was placed in a spot that becomes completely inaccessible after a certain point, rendering it {{Permanently Missable|Content}}. Until the stone was moved by the 1.4 patch, it wasn't uncommon for players to reach the end of the game with up to 11.5 pounds of dead weight taking up space in their inventory. And unlike most quests in the game. You don't get map markers for them. So you have to travel the entire country completely blind searching every single nook&cranny in the ENTIRE game. Unless you use a walk through, or a map marker mod. [[note]] the map marker mod for the stones is one of the highest rated Skyrim mods on the Steam Workshop [[/note]]
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