History Main / FairForItsDay

20th Sep '17 9:02:44 AM Scorpion451
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* Another law from the Old Testament declared in part that the victim of a rape and her rapist were to be considered married. While this may make no sense to a modern reader, this actually invoked a number of secondary laws and traditions that dramatically alter the picture. For instance, a married man was subservient to his wife's parents and male relatives, and obligated to financially support not only her, but her entire extended family. The traditional duties of a Jewish wife of the time, meanwhile, included management of the household's finances and property holdings, with the "proper" role of the husband being advisory rather than authoritative on these matters. She was also free to delegate her husband's physical needs to a servant if she so desired. He was, of course, expected to provide said servant for her.



* Today, the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy is considered to be discriminatory, as it prevented openly gay/bisexual people from serving in the military, and has been nulified. It also prohibited discrimination against ''closeted'' gay/bisexual people.

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* Today, the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy is considered to be discriminatory, as it prevented openly gay/bisexual people from serving in the military, and has been nulified. It also prohibited At the time it was created, however, the intention was to prohibit discrimination against ''closeted'' gay/bisexual people.people. The older and lesser-known "Queen for a Day" policy also gave protection to ForciblyOuted soldiers by assuming SituationalSexuality until proven otherwise.
11th Sep '17 2:35:14 PM PrincessGwen
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* The movie ''Film/RainMan'' is critizized nowadays for introducing the stereotype that all autistic people have savant skills, and for giving out a strict criteria for autism portrayals when the condition is, in reality, loosely defined. However, the film was responsible for mainstream awareness of autism, and it opened the floodgates for introducing mentally-challenged characters in media. The book ''Literature/NeuroTribes'' also points out that the general population became much more sympathetic towards autistic people as they gained a basic understanding of the condition from the movie.

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* The movie ''Film/RainMan'' is critizized criticized nowadays for introducing the stereotype that all autistic people have savant skills, and for giving out a strict criteria for autism portrayals when the condition is, in reality, loosely defined. However, the film was responsible for mainstream awareness of autism, and it opened the floodgates for introducing mentally-challenged characters in media. The book ''Literature/NeuroTribes'' also points out that the general population became much more sympathetic towards autistic people as they gained a basic understanding of the condition from the movie.
10th Sep '17 3:12:28 PM JJHIL325
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Added DiffLines:

* The movie ''Film/RainMan'' is critizized nowadays for introducing the stereotype that all autistic people have savant skills, and for giving out a strict criteria for autism portrayals when the condition is, in reality, loosely defined. However, the film was responsible for mainstream awareness of autism, and it opened the floodgates for introducing mentally-challenged characters in media. The book ''Literature/NeuroTribes'' also points out that the general population became much more sympathetic towards autistic people as they gained a basic understanding of the condition from the movie.
7th Sep '17 12:39:25 AM PaulA
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* Creator/HPLovecraft very rarely gave any female characters important roles in his stories, but his thoughts on women's rights were actually quite progressive for his time (even if he also had racist opinions). Whenever women do show up in his stories, it's a very minor supporting role at best. That said, in ''The Shadow Out of Time'', the narrator describes his ex-wife, who after he apparently went mad ([[ItMakesSenseInContext in actuality, his body had been swapped with an alien from the past]]) actually takes action and gets the rest of her family as far away from her now-abusive husband as possible. There is also talk of strong-willed and intelligent mothers (such as that of Arthur Jermyn), and one or two memorable female antagonists. This is also quite impressive compared to some of the other mythos writers of the time, some of whom did not write women at all.

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* Creator/HPLovecraft very rarely gave any female characters important roles in his stories, but his thoughts on women's rights were actually quite progressive for his time (even if he also had racist opinions). Whenever women do show up in his stories, it's a very minor supporting role at best. That said, in ''The Shadow Out of Time'', ''Literature/TheShadowOutOfTime'', the narrator describes his ex-wife, who after he apparently went mad ([[ItMakesSenseInContext in actuality, his body had been swapped with an alien from the past]]) actually takes action and gets the rest of her family as far away from her now-abusive husband as possible. There is also talk of strong-willed and intelligent mothers (such as that of Arthur Jermyn), and one or two memorable female antagonists. This is also quite impressive compared to some of the other mythos writers of the time, some of whom did not write women at all.
3rd Sep '17 1:13:03 PM rjd1922
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* If you beat ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid 1}} Metroid]]'' in under an hour, it was revealed that Samus is a girl... by showing her in a bikini. This was big at the time, however, as she was the first playable human female main character. (Plus, with the NES's resolution, this was practically the only way to show that she was in fact a woman and not a long-haired man.)

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* If you beat ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid 1}} Metroid]]'' in under an hour, three hours, it was revealed that Samus is a girl... by showing her in a bikini. leotard, or a bikini if it was beaten under one hour. This was big at the time, however, as she was one of the first playable human female main character. (Plus, characters. Plus, with the NES's resolution, this was practically the only way to show with certainty that she was in fact a woman and not a long-haired man.)
27th Aug '17 10:13:48 AM JJHIL325
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* Many people call Dr. John Langdon Down (November 18, 1828 - October 7, 1896) racist for claiming that 'Mongoloids' (now referred to as people with Down's Syndrome) were a throwback to an earlier stage of evolution. However, what they don't realize is that he considered mentally handicapped Caucasians to be proof that non-white races were actually ''human beings'', something that was a topic of much debate among white people then. He also supported the rights of women, claiming that [[LamarckWasRight educated women produced smarter sons]] (contrary to the common belief that excessive education masculinized a woman and made her infertile, or produced lower-quality children).

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* Many people call Dr. John Langdon Down (November 18, 1828 - October 7, 1896) racist ableist for claiming that 'Mongoloids' (now referred to as people with Down's Syndrome) were a throwback to an earlier stage of evolution. However, what they don't realize is that he considered mentally handicapped Caucasians to be proof that non-white races were actually ''human beings'', something that was a topic of much debate among white people then. He also supported the rights of women, claiming that [[LamarckWasRight educated women produced smarter sons]] (contrary to the common belief that excessive education masculinized a woman and made her infertile, or produced lower-quality children).
10th Aug '17 11:37:42 AM N1KF
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Only... it turns out it was comparatively Fair for Its Day. Maybe the HistoricalHeroUpgrade or HistoricalVillainUpgrade wasn't that unfair a reflection on the person's views. Maybe the RoseTintedNarrative just wasn't rose-tinted enough for its original audience. Maybe it was even ripped apart in its own time for being downright insurrectionist, and was brave to go as far as it did. It might even ''completely agree'' with modern attitudes, but not do so [[{{Anvilicious}} Anviliciously]] [[AndThatsTerrible enough for today's audiences]].

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Only... it turns out it was comparatively Fair for Its Day. Maybe the HistoricalHeroUpgrade or HistoricalVillainUpgrade wasn't that unfair a reflection on the person's views. Maybe the RoseTintedNarrative just wasn't rose-tinted enough for its original audience. Maybe it was even ripped apart in its own time for being downright insurrectionist, and was brave to go as far as it did. It might even ''completely agree'' with modern attitudes, but not do so [[{{Anvilicious}} Anviliciously]] {{Anvilicious}}ly [[AndThatsTerrible enough for today's audiences]].



* ''Literature/TheBible'': "An Eye For An Eye" was originally instituted to prevent DisproportionateRetribution or long-term cycles of revenge. The term isn't a call for revenge but a limit on justice: no more than an eye may be taken for an eye. In other words, the punishment must fit the crime. Later passages also imply that monetary compensation was allowed in place of literal violent punishment. Further, the version most people quote is actually a New Testament passage saying that while the law ''permits'' retribution, Christians should choose forgiveness instead.

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* ''Literature/TheBible'': Literature/TheBible: "An Eye For An Eye" was originally instituted to prevent DisproportionateRetribution or long-term cycles of revenge. The term isn't a call for revenge but a limit on justice: no more than an eye may be taken for an eye. In other words, the punishment must fit the crime. Later passages also imply that monetary compensation was allowed in place of literal violent punishment. Further, the version most people quote is actually a New Testament passage saying that while the law ''permits'' retribution, Christians should choose forgiveness instead.
7th Aug '17 6:25:31 PM rjd1922
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* The crows in ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' are often accused of acting like stereotypical black people, and the leader of them is even called Jim Crow [[AllThereInTheManual in the credits]]. But on the other hand, their antics portray them as being incredibly [[CleverCrows clever]], and they prove to be some of the nicer characters in the film when they teach Dumbo how to fly. In fact, they are the ''only'' characters, other than his mother and Timothy, who treat Dumbo well.

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* The crows in ''Disney/{{Dumbo}}'' are often accused of acting like stereotypical black people, and the leader of them is even called Jim Crow [[AllThereInTheManual [[AllThereInTheScript in the credits]]. But on the other hand, their antics portray them as being incredibly [[CleverCrows clever]], {{clever|crows}}, and they prove to be some of the nicer characters in the film when they teach Dumbo how to fly. In fact, they are the ''only'' characters, other than his mother and Timothy, who treat Dumbo well.
7th Aug '17 6:22:56 PM rjd1922
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* ''Series/{{Star Trek|TheOriginalSeries}}'' was progressive for its day, but is still obviously a creation of the 60s.
** Lt. Uhura is the [[TokenMinority only black cast member]], who, as a female communications officer, can come off as little more than a secretary.[[note]] On Series/TheBigBangTheory, Leonard actually points this out, noting that the show's only black character basically "answered the space phone." [[/note]] Nichelle Nichols agreed with this assessment and was going to leave the show at the end of the first season. She was talked into staying, because seeing a black woman on television in any role but that of a maid really was groundbreaking for its day. It even led to the often-quoted first interracial kiss on television, between Kirk and Uhura, in the episode "Plato's Children". The person who felt so inspired by Uhura as a symbol of progress he talked Nichelle into remaining on the show... [[CivilRightsMovement Martin Luther King Jr.]] Whoopi Goldberg also credits seeing Nichols on this show as a major inspiration to her as a child. She says this a big reason she choose to appear on the Star Trek The Next Generation Series.

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* ''Series/{{Star Trek|TheOriginalSeries}}'' Trek|The Original Series}}'' was progressive for its day, but is still obviously a creation of the 60s.
** Lt. Uhura is the [[TokenMinority only black cast member]], who, as a female communications officer, can come off as little more than a secretary.[[note]] On Series/TheBigBangTheory, Leonard actually points this out, noting that the show's only black character basically "answered the space phone." [[/note]] Nichelle Nichols agreed with this assessment and was going to leave the show at the end of the first season. She was talked into staying, because seeing a black woman on television in any role but that of a maid really was groundbreaking for its day. It even led to the often-quoted first interracial kiss on television, between Kirk and Uhura, in the episode "Plato's Children". The person who felt so inspired by Uhura as a symbol of progress he talked Nichelle into remaining on the show... [[CivilRightsMovement Martin Luther King Jr.]] Whoopi Goldberg also credits seeing Nichols on this show as a major inspiration to her as a child. She says this a big reason she choose to appear on the Star Trek The Next Generation Series.''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''.



** As Creator/WarrenBeatty's Film/{{Reds}} reveals, it was UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin's USSR which introduced such things as women's equality (no-fault divorce, abortion rights) and other social welfare measures that liberal democracies either didn't have, regarded as too radical but are now taken for granted. Lenin's government also conducted the first anti-racist campaign of the 20th Century when he conducted campaigns to clamp down on anti-semitism that had been endemic before then (and still did not completely die despite his efforts but Lenin deserves credit for it never rising back to the frequent pogroms of the Tsarist era). Less known, partially because of Stalin's homophobic reversal, but Lenin's government was also the first to legalize homosexuality in the 20th Century.

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** As Creator/WarrenBeatty's Film/{{Reds}} reveals, it was UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin's USSR which introduced such things as women's equality (no-fault divorce, abortion rights) and other social welfare measures that liberal democracies either didn't have, or regarded as too radical radical, but which are now taken for granted. Lenin's government also conducted the first anti-racist campaign of the 20th Century when he conducted campaigns to clamp down on anti-semitism that had been endemic before then (and still did not completely die despite his efforts but Lenin deserves credit for it never rising back to the frequent pogroms of the Tsarist era). Less known, partially because of Stalin's homophobic reversal, but Lenin's government was also the first to legalize homosexuality in the 20th Century.
7th Aug '17 11:38:59 AM Malady
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** There's also a lesser-known non-Holmes mystery short story by ArthurConanDoyle with the title ''The Man with the Watches''[[http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ManWat.shtml]], which is remarkably gay-positive or at least advocating for tolerance. Alright, the narrator is a homophobic / transphobic jerk, the story still ends in [[BuryYourGays tragedy]], and the gay couple are criminals (card sharps) willing to use violence, but the narrative supports the reading that the tragedy wouldn't have happened if the narrator hadn't been such a bigoted bully, and the surviving partner of the pair (who'd been presented as a "seducer of the innocent" by the narrator up to that point) is explicitly shown to not be evil or inhuman in the end, with the narrator even bonding with him a little over their shared grief. And for a straight, mainstream author in the Victorian era, writing this story for the family-friendly, middle-class ''The Strand'' magazine, a story that not only shows the "love that dare not speak its name" in fairly unmistakable ways ''at all'', but also invites the reader to sympathize with the gay characters, is pretty amazing already.

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** There's also a lesser-known non-Holmes mystery short story by ArthurConanDoyle Creator/ArthurConanDoyle with the title ''The Man with the Watches''[[http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ManWat.shtml]], which is remarkably gay-positive or at least advocating for tolerance. Alright, the narrator is a homophobic / transphobic jerk, the story still ends in [[BuryYourGays tragedy]], and the gay couple are criminals (card sharps) willing to use violence, but the narrative supports the reading that the tragedy wouldn't have happened if the narrator hadn't been such a bigoted bully, and the surviving partner of the pair (who'd been presented as a "seducer of the innocent" by the narrator up to that point) is explicitly shown to not be evil or inhuman in the end, with the narrator even bonding with him a little over their shared grief. And for a straight, mainstream author in the Victorian era, writing this story for the family-friendly, middle-class ''The Strand'' magazine, a story that not only shows the "love that dare not speak its name" in fairly unmistakable ways ''at all'', but also invites the reader to sympathize with the gay characters, is pretty amazing already.
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