History Main / FairForItsDay

29th Apr '16 6:39:39 PM jamespolk
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* ''Theatre/InAbrahamsBosom'': This play was probably thought of as progressive in its day, with the story being about a black laborer who dreams of bettering himself and founding a school for local children, only to be murdered by the KKK. But Abraham actually makes some of his own problems by his tendency to burst into violent rages when disrepected by white people. And even more disturbingly, the central message of the play is that he ''shouldn't'' be trying to better himself, that a black man seeking an education and hoping to rise up to the level of the white man is tragic folly.
--> "Time you's learning day white is white and black is black, and Gohd made de white to always be bedder'n de black. It was so intended from the beginning."
16th Apr '16 7:52:56 PM brtd
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* ''Cuius regio eius religio'' [[note]] Latin that translates roughly as: The ruler decides the religion[/note]] is of course incredibly drastic and did force people to either leave their homes or convert on the whim of a local ruler - sometimes several times in their lifetime. But it was a huge advance over the wanton wars between Catholics and Lutherans of earlier times, when rulers who did not like the branch of Christianity of their neighbor took it as a pretext for war. The principle of Westphalian sovereignty which was made into international law with the peace of 1648 that ended the ThirtyYearsWar established for the first time that no power - not even the emperor - had any right to attack a sovereign state just because its leader was Lutheran or Calvinist. This was a huge step forward, even though it did little to protect any other religion. Similarly it gave the toleration of Judaism (which depended mostly on the whims of local rulers) a bit more of a legal foundation, even though Jews were still treated worse than the preferred type of Christian and sometimes even worse than the other type of Christian.

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* ''Cuius regio eius religio'' [[note]] Latin that translates roughly as: The ruler decides the religion[/note]] religion[[/note]] is of course incredibly drastic and did force people to either leave their homes or convert on the whim of a local ruler - sometimes several times in their lifetime. But it was a huge advance over the wanton wars between Catholics and Lutherans of earlier times, when rulers who did not like the branch of Christianity of their neighbor took it as a pretext for war. The principle of Westphalian sovereignty which was made into international law with the peace of 1648 that ended the ThirtyYearsWar established for the first time that no power - not even the emperor - had any right to attack a sovereign state just because its leader was Lutheran or Calvinist. This was a huge step forward, even though it did little to protect any other religion. Similarly it gave the toleration of Judaism (which depended mostly on the whims of local rulers) a bit more of a legal foundation, even though Jews were still treated worse than the preferred type of Christian and sometimes even worse than the other type of Christian.
16th Apr '16 7:50:46 PM brtd
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*** This even applies to the draconian penalties up to ''death'' for violating the Sabbath, as absurd as they sound, they were mostly to get the idea across that allowing everyone a day of rest was SeriousBusiness and NO ONE was going to deny this. Establishing only fines or minor penalties might've not have been much of a deterrent as some might've taken that simply as a cost of doing business (much like how some companies will simply opt to pay fines for business practices or violating environmental laws rather than changing their practices today.)
15th Apr '16 11:00:07 AM jgkitarel
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*** Notably, they provided contributions to Western Education. Remember those structured essays you wrote back in school? Or how academic papers are structured? The Imperial Civil Service Exams have a lot to do with that, as their clear format and structure made it easy for the examiners to look at an essay and judge its merits by ensuring that the essays would follow specific guidelines.
11th Apr '16 8:09:14 PM brtd
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* The frequent gay stereotypes and some of the jokes involving gay characters and homosexuality on ''{{Friends}}'' have not aged well, many of the ones in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsQ5za-J6I8 this video]] (which is over 50 minutes long, aka the length of two full episodes) would be seen as pretty crass if done on a TV show today. However it was one of one of the first TV shows to also have gay and lesbian characters who weren't completely flat characters with no aspects other than their homosexuality, and also portrayed gay and lesbian couples as people who loved each other the same way heterosexual couples do, rather than just only being interested in hook ups with those of the same sex.
8th Apr '16 8:27:19 PM Jhonny
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* Yes the Roman Empire was a slave holding society, much of its population lived in abject poverty and life expectancy was probably no higher than the mid 30s. They also had plumbing made from lead (plumbum in Latin) and overall environmental pollution was probably worse than in many first world countries today, but they also had a remarkably meritocratic military, a relatively fair system of taxation, built roads so good they were still in use by the time the first cars came around and created a need for wider roads, established peace in Europe on a level never achieved until the end of World War II and even provided a very rudimentary system of aid to the (free) urban poor of Rome (which is incidentally where the term "proletarian" comes from). Rome was also very tolerant on the religious front with basically any type of polytheism allowed and sometimes even openly embraced (at the height of the empire there were temples for Babylonian and Egyptian goddesses in Rome) and Judaism as ''religio licita'' (allowed religion) was excluded from the need to worship the emperor.
8th Apr '16 8:20:44 PM Jhonny
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* ''Cuius regio eius religio'' [[note]] Latin that translates roughly as: The ruler decides the religion[/note]] is of course incredibly drastic and did force people to either leave their homes or convert on the whim of a local ruler - sometimes several times in their lifetime. But it was a huge advance over the wanton wars between Catholics and Lutherans of earlier times, when rulers who did not like the branch of Christianity of their neighbor took it as a pretext for war. The principle of Westphalian sovereignty which was made into international law with the peace of 1648 that ended the ThirtyYearsWar established for the first time that no power - not even the emperor - had any right to attack a sovereign state just because its leader was Lutheran or Calvinist. This was a huge step forward, even though it did little to protect any other religion. Similarly it gave the toleration of Judaism (which depended mostly on the whims of local rulers) a bit more of a legal foundation, even though Jews were still treated worse than the preferred type of Christian and sometimes even worse than the other type of Christian.
8th Apr '16 8:10:48 PM Jhonny
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* The constitution of the UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic has been much maligned ever since the fall of the Republic and the rise of the Nazis. However, it was written during a time of military defeat and revolutionary upheaval (the national assembly was in Weimar, because Berlin was overrun by communists fighting militias in civil war like fashion). Despite all its failures (one of the most glaring being that two thirds of two thirds of the Reichstag could change the constitution and no part - not even fundamental human rights - was exempt from this) the constitution survived the 1923 hyperinflation, years of a President openly hostile to the Republic and people voting for fascists and communists in increasing numbers. It was also the first democratic constitution to ever actually become law in Germany and the first constitution ever written or drafted without an emperor. Given that the founders of the Weimar Republic had precious little to draw upon and the deck stacked against them, they manged quite phenomenally well. In fact, the constitution of TheBonnRepublic explicitly includes a few pieces of the Weimar constitution, which remain the law of the land as of 2016. The Weimar constitution also guaranteed equal representation, one man one vote - and (more crucially) one woman one vote (half a year ahead of the US and even more ahead of Britain and France) and established collective bargaining as a legal right. Arguably if Hitler had been shot in 1932 or never been appointed chancellor, the constitution could have weathered that storm as well.
24th Mar '16 12:53:10 PM caffeinedelusions
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** Even the addition of the "under God" clause into the Pledge of Allegiance, on Eisenhower's watch (1954), was fair enough. Its proponents pointed out that it would discriminate against only atheists, agnostics, and polytheists, groups that were in politically unorganized minorities at the time in the United States - not Jews and Muslims (which would have been the implication had the clause been worded "under Jesus").
23rd Mar '16 2:27:33 PM Briguy52748
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* American Indian characters were ''always'' [[NobleSavage heroes]] in mainstream pro wrestling, even though they were most often portrayed by white actor-athletes who could "pass" for Indian, or (in the case of Tatanka) men of mixed race who looked more white than anything else.

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* American Indian characters began as savages in the 1920s and 1930s, during the early days of gimmick characters -- ergo, to promote "cowboy and Indian" storylines. One retrospective, "The Idiot's Guide To Professional Wrestling" (penned by Captain Lou Albano), suggested that as a promotional tool, the wrestler would set up a teepee at city hall (or courthouse, high school, etc.), enticing people to call the local newspaper and send a reporter over to see "what the disturbance was about." The Indian wrestler would be in character and causing a disturbance, and then give the promoter the free publicity he was seeking. Later on, as Native Americans were granted civil rights, these characters were ''always'' [[NobleSavage heroes]] in mainstream pro wrestling, heroes]], even though they were most often continued to be portrayed by white actor-athletes who could "pass" for Indian, Indian or (in the case of Tatanka) men of mixed race who looked more white than anything else.
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