History Main / FairForItsDay

10th Feb '16 8:33:26 PM zoop
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link to Twilight Zone episode
* In 1961 Rod Serling wrote ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' episode "The Big Tall Wish" and cast black actors in all the major roles, which was completely unheard of at the time. Several future episodes followed suit and cast blacks in what would nowadays be considered [[TokenMinority "token black"]] roles, but back then, seeing black people on TV was so rare that even token inclusion was considered revolutionary.
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* In 1961 Rod Serling wrote ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'' episode [[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS1E27TheBigTallWish "The Big Tall Wish" Wish"]] and cast black actors in all the major roles, which was completely unheard of at the time. Several future episodes followed suit and cast blacks in what would nowadays be considered [[TokenMinority "token black"]] roles, but back then, seeing black people on TV was so rare that even token inclusion was considered revolutionary.
8th Feb '16 12:58:18 AM JulianLapostat
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** ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has created a great deal of debate over how fair it is to its Jewish villain Shylock. Shakespeare often wrote villains with understandable grievances, and Shylock is no exception. He is given a famous monologue in which he eloquently complains about the many injustices he has suffered for his faith, which puts his actions in the light of racist persecution. However, critics nonetheless argue that the play's plot is anti-semitic, what with the "Happy Ending" being Shylock's forced conversion to Christianity with his daughter happily married to a Christian. What makes it seem fair is that despite being the BigBad, Shylock gets to live, albeit as a convert and the play has an aesop about Christianity's concept, [[GreedyJew unlike that of Jewish people]] is "[[EsotericHappyEnding mercy]]".
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** ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has created a great deal of debate over how fair it is to its Jewish villain Shylock. Shakespeare often wrote villains with understandable grievances, and Shylock is no exception. He is given a famous monologue in which he eloquently complains about the many injustices he has suffered for his faith, which puts his actions in the light of racist persecution. However, critics nonetheless argue that the play's plot is anti-semitic, what with the "Happy Ending" being Shylock's forced conversion to Christianity with his daughter happily married to a Christian. What makes it seem fair is that despite being the BigBad, Shylock gets to live, albeit as a convert and the play has an aesop about Christianity's concept, [[GreedyJew Christianity, unlike that of Jewish people]] is "[[EsotericHappyEnding mercy]]".other religions, being more merciful.
8th Feb '16 12:27:03 AM JulianLapostat
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* Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's plays tackled such conceptions as ReligionIsWrong, homosexuality and racism and his plays were cited by Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/BeroltBrecht for having a great deal of UnbuiltTrope. While some have argued that Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' is more racist than ''The Merchant of Venice'' because the Jewish villain is punished. Others argue that Marlowe's play is, seen as a whole, far more sympathetic. While not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has a Jewish BigBad and supporting character). Barabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the hands of Christians and Muslims. One speech is cited by scholars to have inspired Shakespeare's famous monologue:
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* Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's plays tackled such conceptions as ReligionIsWrong, homosexuality and racism and his plays were cited by Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/BeroltBrecht Creator/BertoltBrecht for having a great deal of UnbuiltTrope. While some have argued that Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' is more racist than ''The Merchant of Venice'' because the Jewish villain is punished. Others argue that Marlowe's play is, seen as a whole, far more sympathetic. While not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has a Jewish BigBad and supporting character). Barabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the hands of Christians and Muslims. One speech is cited by scholars to have inspired Shakespeare's famous monologue:
8th Feb '16 12:26:11 AM JulianLapostat
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-->-- '''Shylock''', Creator/WilliamShakespeare's ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'', in what was a radical statement for his day (as opposed to being, as is now clear, [[CaptainObviousAesop pretty self-evident]])
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-->-- '''Shylock''', Creator/WilliamShakespeare's ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'', in what was seems to be a radical statement for his day (as opposed to being, as is now clear, [[CaptainObviousAesop pretty self-evident]])

** ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has created a great deal of debate over how fair it is to its Jewish villain Shylock. Shakespeare often wrote villains with understandable grievances, and Shylock is no exception. He is given a famous monologue in which he eloquently complains about the many injustices he has suffered for his faith. This was a lot more fair than most Jewish characters were treated in Shakespeare's day. However, critics nonetheless argue that the play's plot is anti-semitic, what with the "Happy Ending" being Shylock's forced conversion to Christianity with his daughter happily married to a Christian. Some argue that from Shakespeare's perspective, Shylock got a LighterAndSofter treatment than Barabas in Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's far darker ''Theatre/TheJewOfMalta'' where the villain is killed by boiling in oil.
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** ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has created a great deal of debate over how fair it is to its Jewish villain Shylock. Shakespeare often wrote villains with understandable grievances, and Shylock is no exception. He is given a famous monologue in which he eloquently complains about the many injustices he has suffered for his faith. This was a lot more fair than most Jewish characters were treated faith, which puts his actions in Shakespeare's day.the light of racist persecution. However, critics nonetheless argue that the play's plot is anti-semitic, what with the "Happy Ending" being Shylock's forced conversion to Christianity with his daughter happily married to a Christian. Some argue What makes it seem fair is that from Shakespeare's perspective, despite being the BigBad, Shylock got gets to live, albeit as a LighterAndSofter treatment than Barabas in Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's far darker ''Theatre/TheJewOfMalta'' where convert and the villain play has an aesop about Christianity's concept, [[GreedyJew unlike that of Jewish people]] is killed by boiling in oil."[[EsotericHappyEnding mercy]]".

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** * Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's plays tackled such conceptions as ReligionIsWrong, homosexuality and racism and his plays were cited by Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/BeroltBrecht for having a great deal of UnbuiltTrope. While some have argued that Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' is more racist than ''The Merchant of Venice'' because the Jewish villain is punished. Others argue that Marlowe's play is, seen as a whole, far more sympathetic. While not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has created a great deal of debate over how fair it is to its Jewish villain Shylock. Shakespeare often wrote villains with understandable grievances, BigBad and Shylock is no exception. He is given a famous monologue in which he eloquently complains about supporting character). Barabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the many injustices he has suffered for his faith. This was a lot more fair than most Jewish characters were treated in hands of Christians and Muslims. One speech is cited by scholars to have inspired Shakespeare's day. However, critics nonetheless argue that famous monologue: --> '''Barabbas''': Why, I esteem the play's plot is anti-semitic, what with injury far less,\\ To take the "Happy Ending" being Shylock's forced conversion to Christianity with his daughter happily married to a Christian. Some argue that from lives of miserable men\\ Than be the causers of their misery.\\ You have my wealth, the labour of my life,\\ The comfort of mine age, my children's hope;\\ And therefore ne'er distinguish of the wrong. ** Also where Shakespeare's perspective, Shylock got play makes a LighterAndSofter treatment than big deal about how the Christianity being "the quality of mercy", in Marlowe's plays, all the characters (Christians, Muslims, Jew) are shown to be equally corrupt, and the play makes it clear that politics drives religion ("I count religion a childish toy/And hold there is no sin but ignorance") and the overall focus is how oppression forces minority groups to start BecomingTheMask and make them decide ThenLetMeBeEvil, which makes Barabas in Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's far darker ''Theatre/TheJewOfMalta'' where a ByronicHero who refuses to convert and dies defiant and unrepentant. While the villain is killed by boiling in oil.forces that defeat him are not the forces of order so much as another machiavellian and corrupt authority.
5th Feb '16 3:13:29 PM KJMackley
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* ''Series/HomeImprovement'' is, in many ways, a standard sitcom about a family where the dimwitted husband constantly has to apologize to his CloserToEarth wife about whatever screw-up he's done. But on a closer inspection, Tim is a loving husband and father and his conflicts with Jill is more about genuine miscommunication between genders than being irresponsible or selfish (most of his [[DoomItYourself DIY disasters]] come from trying to make Jill's life easier). The show received loads of fan letters praising the show for how well it represented marital arguments, and in multiple occasions Jill realizes that the way she treats Tim sometimes facilitates his behavior or she makes her own mistake and has to apologize to him.
25th Jan '16 9:23:01 AM kraas
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** The most common punishments in the Bible are flogging and fines, with death prescribed for extreme cases. That's not unusual for ancient societies, where food scarcity made imprisonment impractical.
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** The most common punishments in the Bible are flogging and fines, with death prescribed for extreme cases. That's not unusual for ancient societies, where food scarcity made imprisonment impractical.' * [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Laurens John Laurens]] was the son of a wealthy plantation owner and a colonel in the Continental Army during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution. In contrast to most of his contemporaries, he believed that black and white people were equally human, and it was disingenuous of the nascent nation to espouse liberty while keeping a subset of humanity in bondage. -->''"We have sunk the Africans & their descendants below the Standard of Humanity, and almost render'd them incapable of that Blessing which equal Heaven bestow'd upon us all."''
21st Jan '16 3:14:45 PM TheFuzzinator
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That attitude is why I Love Lucy could even air in a time when miscegenation was illegal. From a modern stanpoint, they predated the Star Trek interracial kiss by a over a decade, but back then it wasn't considered an interracial relationship.
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*** This can, however, actually come off a big fat case of ValuesDissonance when you realize that, in the 1960's, lighter-skinned Hispanic people like Montalban and Desi Arnaz were considered white. In the episode which introduces Khan, Montalban is wearing a bad wig and some very obvious {{Brownface}} makeup. Possibly one of the few things on this page that can look better from a ''modern'' perspective.
21st Jan '16 2:56:03 PM TheFuzzinator
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Actually, he pretty explicitly claimed that they ''weren't''. Tolkien hated allegories, and to the end of his life maintained there weren't any in his legendarium.
** Also Tolkien claimed he based the Dwarves on the [[SpaceJews Jews]]. This can make the writing about the Dwarves loving gold and Thorin's obsessive greed towards the end of The Hobbit a bit cringe-worthy. Yet the Dwarves are mostly portrayed sympathetically and heroically. And there is some FridgeBrilliance in that the Dwarves end up getting their homeland back.
17th Jan '16 12:09:03 AM Pichu-kun
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* Most early movies depicting homosexuality directly, as opposed to through coded inference, inspire critical responses from modern viewers. ''Theater/TheChildrensHour'' has generated controversy through the UnfortunateImplications involving [[spoiler:Shirley Maclaine's character]]. Others criticize Basil Dearden's ''Victim'' (1961) for showing its gay characters as passive victims of criminals and blackmailers, focusing on their sexuality to [[{{Anvilicious}} make a social statement]]. However given that homosexual acts were still illegal in the UK at the time, ''Victim'' broke new ground in portraying the lead character, who eventually agrees to testify against the blackmailers, in a sympathetic way.
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* Most early movies depicting homosexuality directly, as opposed to through coded inference, inspire critical responses from modern viewers. ''Theater/TheChildrensHour'' ''Theatre/TheChildrensHour'' has generated controversy through the UnfortunateImplications involving [[spoiler:Shirley Maclaine's character]]. Others criticize Basil Dearden's ''Victim'' (1961) for showing its gay characters as passive victims of criminals and blackmailers, focusing on their sexuality to [[{{Anvilicious}} make a social statement]]. However given that homosexual acts were still illegal in the UK at the time, ''Victim'' broke new ground in portraying the lead character, who eventually agrees to testify against the blackmailers, in a sympathetic way.
10th Jan '16 3:59:07 PM mlsmithca
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YMMV is not and was never a trope. Do not link to it for any reason. Also, pages should never link to themselves.
* Creator/RudyardKipling rejected the notion that white people were inherently superior to non-white people. He believed that non-white people were no less capable of nobility, morality, and kindness. However, he also believed that non-whites needed the guidance of white people to better themselves, with his definition of "better" being English culture. This was a fairly common FairForItsDay belief argued by many people who rejected racism but supported British imperialism.
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* Creator/RudyardKipling rejected the notion that white people were inherently superior to non-white people. He believed that non-white people were no less capable of nobility, morality, and kindness. However, he also believed that non-whites needed the guidance of white people to better themselves, with his definition of "better" being English culture. This was a fairly common FairForItsDay belief at the time argued by many people who rejected racism but supported British imperialism.

** ''Theatre/TheMarriageOfFigaro'' was unquestionably far beyond FairForItsDay. Its denunciation of aristocratic abuse of power led to the play being banned across Europe and helped to inspire TheFrenchRevolution, while its gender politics are still widely praised as extremely proto-feminist. But the fact remains that its "happy ending" has the arrogant, lecherous Count Almaviva still fully in power and [[WhyWouldAnyoneTakeHimBack forgiven by his emotionally abused wife]], with no hint that his behavior will change in any long-term way. Though {{YMMV}} on whether Beaumarchais, Mozart and Da Ponte were actually okay with this conclusion or meant for the audience to question it.
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** ''Theatre/TheMarriageOfFigaro'' was unquestionably far beyond FairForItsDay.fair for its day. Its denunciation of aristocratic abuse of power led to the play being banned across Europe and helped to inspire TheFrenchRevolution, while its gender politics are still widely praised as extremely proto-feminist. But the fact remains that its "happy ending" has the arrogant, lecherous Count Almaviva still fully in power and [[WhyWouldAnyoneTakeHimBack forgiven by his emotionally abused wife]], with no hint that his behavior will change in any long-term way. Though {{YMMV}} on whether Beaumarchais, Mozart and Da Ponte were actually okay with this conclusion or meant for the audience to question it.
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