History Main / FairForItsDay

21st Jun '16 12:20:42 AM Mikeyfan93
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* In ''[[VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry Leisure Suit Larry 6]]'', one of the girls Larry dates turns out to be transgender, something Larry reacts to in disgust. This was less "transgender people are gross" and more "Hey, ''Film/TheCryingGame'' just came out, let's do a parody of Dil!"

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* In ''[[VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry Leisure Suit Larry 6]]'', Shablee, one of the girls Larry dates dates, turns out to be transgender, something Larry reacts to in disgust. This was less "transgender people are gross" and more "Hey, ''Film/TheCryingGame'' just came out, let's do of a parody of Dil!"Dil from ''Film/TheCryingGame''.
17th Jun '16 7:46:19 AM RagsOrRomance
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* While ''Literature/TheWellOfLoneliness'' does use the old-fashioned theory of 'sexual inversion' to explain the protagonist's homosexuality, which seems to imply that all lesbians are by nature masculine, it was still very radical for its time for using this biological theory of homosexuality to claim that homosexual love is just as natural as heterosexual love, and should be accepted by society. Its message was so shocking for the time that it was famously banned for 'obscenity'.
12th Jun '16 8:58:34 PM PaulA
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* Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's plays tackled such conceptions as ReligionIsWrong, homosexuality and racism and his plays were cited by Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/BertoltBrecht for having a great deal of UnbuiltTrope. While some have argued that Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' is more racist than ''The Merchant of Venice'' because the Jewish villain is punished. Others argue that Marlowe's play is, seen as a whole, far more sympathetic. While not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has a Jewish BigBad and supporting character). Barabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the hands of Christians and Muslims. One speech is cited by scholars to have inspired Shakespeare's famous monologue:

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* Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's plays tackled such conceptions as ReligionIsWrong, homosexuality and racism and his plays were cited by Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/BertoltBrecht for having a great deal of UnbuiltTrope. While some have argued that Marlowe's ''The Jew of Malta'' ''Theatre/TheJewOfMalta'' is more racist than ''The Merchant of Venice'' because the Jewish villain is punished. Others punished, others argue that Marlowe's play is, seen as a whole, far more sympathetic. While not free of the anti-semitism of its premise at the very least has a Jewish VillainProtagonist (where ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' has a Jewish BigBad and supporting character). Barabas also makes it clear that his actions are inspired by racism and oppression at the hands of Christians and Muslims. One speech is cited by scholars to have inspired Shakespeare's famous monologue:
10th Jun '16 10:35:27 AM Cramero
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* The classic Hollywood western was, rightfully, criticized by later audiences for its negative stereotypes of Native Americans, for reinforcing MightyWhitey and its uncritical glorification of ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption. Having said that,

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* The classic Hollywood western was, rightfully, was criticized by later audiences for its negative stereotypes of Native Americans, for reinforcing MightyWhitey and its uncritical glorification of ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption. Having said that,
7th Jun '16 6:22:39 PM Doug86
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* Like most of the protagonists of 'boy's own' British adventure novels of the early twentieth century, John Buchan's Richard Hannay of such works as ''Literature/TheThirtyNineSteps'' reads as being quite racist and jingoistic to a modern reader; however, when compared to his peers (such as [[Literature/BulldogDrummond "Bulldog" Drummond]]), Hannay is notable for actually being quite open-minded and empathetic towards many of the traditionally stereotyped groups of the literature of the period (such as Germans, pacifists, Jews, ''etc''), and frequently avoids demonizing them. A lot has been made of racial slurs against Jews in ''The Thirty-Nine Steps'', but a more careful reading shows that they are all made by one paranoid and possibly unbalanced character. In RealLife, Buchan supported Zionism to the extent that at the outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, he featured on Hitler's death list of pro-Semitic persons.
* ''Greenmantle'' is noteworthy for treating its German villains with a degree of sympathy and respect, quite surprising given that the book was written in the midst of UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. Even Kaiser Wilhelm makes a brief cameo, coming off as a decent man manipulated by his subordinates into starting the war.

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* Like most of the protagonists of 'boy's own' British adventure novels of the early twentieth century, John Buchan's Richard Hannay of such works as ''Literature/TheThirtyNineSteps'' reads as being quite racist and jingoistic to a modern reader; however, when compared to his peers (such as [[Literature/BulldogDrummond "Bulldog" Drummond]]), Hannay is notable for actually being quite open-minded and empathetic towards many of the traditionally stereotyped groups of the literature of the period (such as Germans, pacifists, Jews, ''etc''), and frequently avoids demonizing them. A lot has been made of racial slurs against Jews in ''The Thirty-Nine Steps'', but a more careful reading shows that they are all made by one paranoid and possibly unbalanced character. In RealLife, Buchan supported Zionism to the extent that at the outbreak of UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, he featured on Hitler's death list of pro-Semitic persons.
* ''Greenmantle'' is noteworthy for treating its German villains with a degree of sympathy and respect, quite surprising given that the book was written in the midst of UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Even Kaiser Wilhelm makes a brief cameo, coming off as a decent man manipulated by his subordinates into starting the war.
7th Jun '16 5:36:45 PM PhantomXXII
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** On the topic of the first on-screen kiss, it was slipped in as a genuine tender moment in the middle of the episode [[spoiler: where Buffy's mom dies]], handily and deliberately preventing it from being played for sex appeal in advertising.
2nd Jun '16 11:13:49 AM TheFuzzinator
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** Those miniskirts that are greeted with rolled eyes nowadays were considered a mark of female liberation at the time, as women who wore them were exerting their right to dress sexy instead of like timid housefraus. Sure, it was {{fanservice}} too, but not ''just'' that.

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** Those miniskirts that are greeted with rolled eyes nowadays were considered a mark of female liberation at the time, as women who wore them were exerting their right to dress sexy instead of like timid housefraus. Sure, it was {{fanservice}} too, but not ''just'' that. Also, the miniskirts weren't mandatory: some of the female background crew are shown wearing pants. The skirt uniform was an option, a distinction which can be lost on modern audiences.



** And then there's Khan. The reason given for [[Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness the 2013 movie]] casting the white Creator/BenedictCumberbatch to play him instead of an Indian actor was that they would feel uncomfortable having a man of color as a villain, particularly since that version [[PostNineElevenTerrorismMovie played Khan up as a terrorist]]. As others have pointed out, however, they actually didn't get it right in the original series either, as the Indian Sikh Khan was played by the Mexican-born Ricardo Montalban. However, in the 1960s, casting an actor of color as a character of color was already fairly progressive [[note]] Remember: that episode came out just five years after ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' cast Alec Guinness and Anthony Quinn as Arabs[[/note]], and casting a man of color as a charismatic genius who was ''eugenically bred to be superior in every way'' was almost unthinkable. As it was, [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales the Sikh community loved the character]] for those aspects and were upset when the film producers threw away the chance for a Sikh actor to play him.

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** And then there's Khan. The reason given for [[Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness the 2013 movie]] casting the white Creator/BenedictCumberbatch to play him instead of an Indian actor was that they would feel uncomfortable having a man of color as a villain, particularly since that version [[PostNineElevenTerrorismMovie played Khan up as a terrorist]]. As others have pointed out, however, they actually didn't get it right in the original series either, as the Indian Sikh Khan was played by the Mexican-born Ricardo Montalban. However, in the 1960s, casting an actor of color as a character of color was already fairly progressive [[note]] Remember: that episode came out just five years after ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' cast Alec Guinness and Anthony Quinn as Arabs[[/note]], and casting a man of color as a charismatic genius who was ''eugenically bred to be superior in every way'' was almost unthinkable. As it was, [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales the Sikh community loved the character]] for those aspects and were upset when the film producers threw away the chance for a Sikh actor to play him.
2nd Jun '16 12:10:25 AM TheFuzzinator
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** If you absolutely couldn't get away from being a slave, historical documentation in Pompeii suggests you had a better chance of living a decent life if you were a slave in some parts of Rome. Some of those records show that many a successful business owner was a former slave; it was fairly common for an owner to free a slave after a period of time, and some even gave the former slave a financial leg up to build their own life. While they didn't have ''all'' the benefits of a citizen, their children did, and there doesn't appear to have been a great deal of stigma attached to marrying a former slave who'd become successful. Slaves could even receive extravagant gifts from their owners: in the ruins of Pompeii was found a heavy gold bracelet inscribed with, "To a slave girl, from her master" engraved in it. While slavery itself usually sucked, at least a Roman slave had a healthy chance of actually being freed.
31st May '16 8:52:19 AM CaptainCrawdad
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*** This can, however, actually come off a big fat case of ValuesDissonance when you realize that, in the 1960's, lighter-skinned Hispanic people like Montalban and Desi Arnaz were considered white. In the episode which introduces Khan, Montalban is wearing a bad wig and some very obvious {{Brownface}} makeup. Possibly one of the few things on this page that can look better from a ''modern'' perspective.
31st May '16 8:50:04 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/{{Scandal}}'': For today, sort of. Though for a Shonda Rhimes (''Series/GreysAnatomy'' and ''PrivatePractice'') show, that's really the norm.
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