History Main / FairForItsDay

22nd Jun '17 1:31:56 PM Baggins
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* In ''[[VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry Leisure Suit Larry 6]]'', Shablee, one of the girls Larry dates, turns out to be transgender, something Larry reacts to in disgust. This was less "transgender people are gross" and more of a parody of Dil from ''Film/TheCryingGame''.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry Leisure Suit Larry 6]]'', Shablee, one of the girls Larry dates, turns out to be transgender, a transvestite, something Larry reacts to in disgust. This was less "transgender people "transvestites are gross" and more of a parody of Dil from ''Film/TheCryingGame''.
20th Jun '17 6:03:24 PM Fireblood
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* ''Film/SouthPacific'' was intended as an anti-racism musical and movie. Rodgers and Hammerstein originally intended the show to end with [[spoiler:Cable and Liat getting married]] until public and political pressure led to [[spoiler:Cable being killed to prevent an interracial marriage from occurring on stage]].

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* ''Film/SouthPacific'' was intended as an anti-racism musical and movie. Rodgers and Hammerstein originally intended the show to end with [[spoiler:Cable and Liat getting married]] until public and political pressure led to [[spoiler:Cable being killed to prevent an interracial marriage from occurring on stage]]. However, they still had a man in a past interracial marriage (with mixed race kids) portrayed well, and his Southern love interest shown as wrong for initially disliking (coming to accept it over the course of the story).



* ''Film/BenHur'': The Arab sheik is portrayed by a white guy (although some Arabs, from the more northern parts of the Middle East especially, look almost white, so it's not too much of a stretch). He's also portrayed as a decent person, has a Star of David talisman fashioned for Ben Hur, explicitly draws a parallel between the oppression of Jews and the oppression of Arabs at the hands of the Romans, and is generally one of the very few male characters with no obvious bigotry.

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* ''Film/BenHur'': The Arab sheik sheikh is portrayed by a white guy (although some Arabs, from the more northern parts of the Middle East especially, look almost white, so it's not too much of a stretch).stretch. They also often view ''themselves'' as white, and have been called Caucasians). He's also portrayed as a decent person, has a Star of David talisman fashioned for Ben Hur, explicitly draws a parallel between the oppression of Jews and the oppression of Arabs at the hands of the Romans, and is generally one of the very few male characters with no obvious bigotry.



* ''Film/RockyIV'' is often mocked today for delivering a BrokenAesop in the end, where Rocky tries to promote peace between the US and the Soviets. This wouldn't have been so bad, had he not made that speech just after beating the crap out of their Russian champion Ivan Drago on national television. Still, misplaced as it was, movies that portrayed Russia in any sympathetic light in the mid-80s height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar was hard to find.

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* ''Film/RockyIV'' is often mocked today for delivering a BrokenAesop in the end, where Rocky tries to promote peace between the US and the Soviets. This wouldn't have been so bad, had he not made that speech just after beating the crap out of their Russian champion Ivan Drago on national television. Still, misplaced as it was, movies that portrayed Russia in any sympathetic light at all in the mid-80s height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar was were pretty hard to find.



* The Literature/LandOfOz series by Creator/LFrankBaum makes it difficult to realize that it was written more than a hundred years ago when you consider how many women are in positions of power, how many different personalities and mannerisms come with each woman, there was an all-female revolt against the Emerald City, the entire Land of Oz itself is ruled by a woman, and how little cultural quips such as women being delegated to being inside the home are mercilessly shunned by eponymous characters. It's about as quietly feminist a fantasy world as it gets, and it was written in a time nearly two decades before the United States granted women the right to vote.
** Though at the same time, one doesn't have to read too carefully to spot some pretty ridiculous (by today's standards) stereotypes. For instance, the soldiers of the all-female revolt mentioned above use knitting needles as their weapon of choice, and they conquer the Emerald City because the army (which is only one old man) would never dare harm a lady. Also, when the leader of the revolt, Jinjur, is expelled from her throne, she laments that she now has to go back home and milk cows.
** On the other hand, Jinjur is expelled by the all-female army of real soldiers fielded by Glinda the Good, and replaced on the throne by another woman, Queen Ozma. So it's not exactly The Patriarchy Strikes Back.

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* The Literature/LandOfOz series by Creator/LFrankBaum makes it difficult to realize that it was written more than a hundred years ago when you consider how many women are in positions of power, how many different personalities and mannerisms come with each woman, there was an all-female revolt against the Emerald City, the entire Land of Oz itself is ruled by a woman, and how little cultural quips such as women being delegated to being inside the home are mercilessly shunned by eponymous characters. It's about as quietly feminist a fantasy world as it gets, and it was written in a time nearly two decades before the United States granted women the right to vote.
**
vote. Though at the same time, one doesn't have to read too carefully to spot some pretty ridiculous (by today's standards) stereotypes. For instance, the soldiers of the all-female revolt mentioned above use knitting needles as their weapon of choice, and they conquer the Emerald City because the army (which is only one old man) would never dare harm a lady. Also, when the leader of the revolt, Jinjur, is expelled from her throne, she laments that she now has to go back home and milk cows.
** On the other hand,
cows. Still, Jinjur is expelled by the all-female army of real soldiers fielded by Glinda the Good, and replaced on the throne by another woman, Queen Ozma. So it's not exactly The Patriarchy Strikes Back. Baum was a suffragist himself (in fact his mother-in-law was feminist and suffragist Matilda Joslyn Gage, whose views were even more radical than most women's rights activists at the time, which he channeled into his work).



* The ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' stories feature various racist stereotypes common to the era of the 1870s to the 1890s, but there is a hint of WriterOnBoard in the way Holmes, Watson, and the women in the series express, to different degrees, distaste for the way divorce laws were slanted against women. Holmes also lampshades, a century-plus ago, the "American fascination with guns". There's also one story in which members of the Ku Klux Klan appear as villains.

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* The ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' stories feature various racist stereotypes common to the era of the 1870s to the 1890s, but there is a hint of WriterOnBoard in the way Holmes, Watson, and the women in the series express, to different degrees, distaste for the way divorce laws were slanted against women. Holmes also lampshades, a century-plus ago, the "American fascination with guns". There's also one story in which members of the Ku Klux Klan appear as villains. He also shows interracial marriage favorably in one story, when it was widely taboo and even illegal, with a woman having to hide her mixed race child due to this (her new husband, who is white, accepts her child though).
8th Jun '17 6:36:24 PM DustSnitch
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* Disney's [[OldShame current stance]] on ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'' is that it is too racially offensive even for a home video release. The movie had Uncle Remus (who was [[InsistentTerminology a sharecropper, not a slave]]). However, since the South had a way of cutting corners after they lost the Civil War, sharecroppers weren't too far removed from slaves, and many were slaves who couldn't find any other work, only this time they got paid with a fraction of the crop they farmed, and even then landlords and merchants would unfairly treat sharecroppers. So people were understandably offended when they showed Remus as complacent and even positive about his position. Despite this, Uncle Remus the only intelligent, mature person in the movie, whereas the white people were portrayed as idiots. Without Uncle Remus, that family would have fallen apart, and the movie says so. The film gets a lot of flack for presenting "happy slaves", and given the reasons mentioned above, that's fair. It also is criticized for Remus' "exaggerated" accent and dialect, despite the fact that it is realistic for its time period. The actor who played Uncle Remus, James Baskett, originally auditioned for a bit voice acting gig. Walt Disney liked his performance so much that he was given the roles of both Uncle Remus and Br'er Fox, and Disney did quite a bit of work behind the scenes to get the Academy to acknowledge Baskett's performance with an honorary Oscar-- and that right there is the definition of this trope: the very first Oscar awarded to an African-American male, yes, but an "honorary" one.

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* Disney's [[OldShame current stance]] on ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'' ''Film/SongOfTheSouth'' is that it is too racially offensive even for a home video release. The movie had Uncle Remus (who was [[InsistentTerminology a sharecropper, not a slave]]). However, since the South had a way of cutting corners after they lost the Civil War, sharecroppers weren't too far removed from slaves, and many were slaves who couldn't find any other work, only this time they got paid with a fraction of the crop they farmed, and even then landlords and merchants would unfairly treat sharecroppers. So people were understandably offended when they showed Remus as complacent and even positive about his position. Despite this, Uncle Remus the only intelligent, mature person in the movie, whereas the white people were portrayed as idiots. Without Uncle Remus, that family would have fallen apart, and the movie says so. The film gets a lot of flack for presenting "happy slaves", and given the reasons mentioned above, that's fair. It also is criticized for Remus' "exaggerated" accent and dialect, despite the fact that it is realistic for its time period. The actor who played Uncle Remus, James Baskett, originally auditioned for a bit voice acting gig. Walt Disney liked his performance so much that he was given the roles of both Uncle Remus and Br'er Fox, and Disney did quite a bit of work behind the scenes to get the Academy to acknowledge Baskett's performance with an honorary Oscar-- and that right there is the definition of this trope: the very first Oscar awarded to an African-American male, yes, but an "honorary" one.
3rd Jun '17 3:31:16 PM NumberFortyFour
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* ''Literature/AroundTheWorldIn80Days'': The book's protagonist, an Englishman, falls in love with and marries an Indian princess. Although Vernes describes her as [[ButNotTooBlack fair skinned and notes that her English is perfect]], most likely as an excuse to make the pairing more acceptable to his 19th century audience, the fact that the book features an interracial marriage at all is still fairly progressive for its time period.
1st Jun '17 9:39:57 AM BiffJr
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** Speaking of ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'', Aurora, nor the prince are the main protagonist. That honour goes to the three good fairies who are portrayed as competent women and prove necessary help for the Prince. The antagonist is also female meaning that most of the film is driven by women which is rather feminist for the time.

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** Speaking of ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'', Aurora, Neither Aurora nor the prince are the main protagonist. That honour honor goes to the three good fairies who are portrayed as competent women and prove necessary help for the Prince. The antagonist is also female meaning that most of the film is driven by women which is rather feminist for the time.
31st May '17 4:33:30 AM ergeis
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* The ''Franchise/CharlieChan'' films of the Thirties and Forties may cause some embarrassment to modern audiences, with their hero's YouNoTakeCandle English and stereotypical "Oriental" aphorisms; however, the character was actually intended as a [[SubvertedTrope subversion]] of the then-ubiquitous YellowPeril villain and actually did a good deal to regenerate the character of Asians among Westerners. It's worth noting that Charlie Chan's sons were played by Chinese-American actors and given a "Gee, Pop!" all-Americanness. In "Charlie Chan at the Olympics," Charlie's son is representing the U.S.A. as an Olympic swimmer.

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* The ''Franchise/CharlieChan'' films of the Thirties and Forties may cause some embarrassment to modern audiences, with their hero's YouNoTakeCandle English and stereotypical "Oriental" aphorisms; however, the character was actually intended as a [[SubvertedTrope subversion]] of the then-ubiquitous YellowPeril villain and actually did a good deal to regenerate the character of Asians among Westerners. It's worth noting that Charlie Chan's sons were played by Chinese-American actors and given a "Gee, Pop!" all-Americanness. In "Charlie Chan at the Olympics," Charlie's son is representing the U.S.A. as an Olympic swimmer. Earl Derr Biggers originally wrote the novels because he was appalled by the racism he witnessed when he visited California.
24th May '17 9:40:22 AM youfeelingluckypunk27
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* Despite Disney's [[OldShame current stance]] on ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'', that movie portrayed Uncle Remus (who was [[InsistentTerminology a sharecropper, not a slave]]) as the only intelligent, mature person in the movie, whereas the white people were portrayed as idiots. Without Uncle Remus, that family would have fallen apart, and the movie says so. The film gets a lot of flak for presenting "happy slaves"... [[HateDumb even though Remus was a sharecropper, not a slave.]] It also is criticized for Remus' "exaggerated" accent and dialect, despite the fact that it is realistic for its time period. The actor who played Uncle Remus, James Baskett, originally auditioned for a bit voice acting gig. Walt Disney liked his performance so much that he was given the roles of both Uncle Remus and Br'er Fox, and Disney did quite a bit of work behind the scenes to get the Academy to acknowledge Baskett's performance with an honorary Oscar-- and that right there is the definition of this trope: the very first Oscar awarded to an African-American male, yes, but an "honorary" one.
** Sharecroppers lived one level above slaves.
** And many sharecroppers were former slaves who couldn't find any other work.

to:

* Despite Disney's [[OldShame current stance]] on ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'', ''Disney/SongOfTheSouth'' is that it is too racially offensive even for a home video release. The movie portrayed had Uncle Remus (who was [[InsistentTerminology a sharecropper, not a slave]]) slave]]). However, since the South had a way of cutting corners after they lost the Civil War, sharecroppers weren't too far removed from slaves, and many were slaves who couldn't find any other work, only this time they got paid with a fraction of the crop they farmed, and even then landlords and merchants would unfairly treat sharecroppers. So people were understandably offended when they showed Remus as complacent and even positive about his position. Despite this, Uncle Remus the only intelligent, mature person in the movie, whereas the white people were portrayed as idiots. Without Uncle Remus, that family would have fallen apart, and the movie says so. The film gets a lot of flak flack for presenting "happy slaves"... [[HateDumb even though Remus was a sharecropper, not a slave.]] slaves", and given the reasons mentioned above, that's fair. It also is criticized for Remus' "exaggerated" accent and dialect, despite the fact that it is realistic for its time period. The actor who played Uncle Remus, James Baskett, originally auditioned for a bit voice acting gig. Walt Disney liked his performance so much that he was given the roles of both Uncle Remus and Br'er Fox, and Disney did quite a bit of work behind the scenes to get the Academy to acknowledge Baskett's performance with an honorary Oscar-- and that right there is the definition of this trope: the very first Oscar awarded to an African-American male, yes, but an "honorary" one. \n** Sharecroppers lived one level above slaves.\n** And many sharecroppers were former slaves who couldn't find any other work.
23rd May '17 3:25:05 PM HighCrate
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** It was also based on actual biographical writings, albeit likely exaggerated somewhat, by said white woman. Who was hired by the king as part of an attempt ''on his part'' to educate his wives and children to make Siam more able to interact with the then-still-dominant British Empire - which must have been successful, since Siam was one of only three East Asian countries to resist colonization. To put it simply: the King was GenreSavvy. He knew that if he put on a good show about how "civilized" Siam was, they could avoid subjugation by subverting the WhiteMansBurden "justification." His son was also responsible for ending many of the darker institutions of Siamese society that the book portrays, including slavery.

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** It was also based on actual biographical writings, albeit likely exaggerated somewhat, by said white woman. Who was hired by the king as part of an attempt ''on his part'' to educate his wives and children to make Siam more able to interact with the then-still-dominant British Empire - which must have been successful, since Siam was one of only three East Asian countries to resist colonization. To put it simply: the King was GenreSavvy. He knew that if he put on a good show about how "civilized" Siam was, they could avoid subjugation by subverting the WhiteMansBurden "justification." His son was also responsible for ending many of the darker institutions of Siamese society that the book portrays, including slavery.
21st May '17 10:49:38 AM nombretomado
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** Some of Marx's criticism is overly harsh, (such as comparing factory work to literal slavery - which was ''actually still a thing'' while he was alive) but the actual conditions of VictorianBritain were dire enough to make him see things that way. Engels' "Conditions of the Working Class in England" describing what England was like in the 1840s shows just how unbelievably miserable conditions were - Charles Dickens, if nothing, romanticized this misery.[[note]]To Marx and Engels, people were quite literally being dehumanized and turned into cogs for an economy machine that rich people profited off of; factories had no safety standards, all kinds of people - men, women, and children, were regularly killed or maimed by them, and these people were never compensated. They were paid such insubstantial wages that most workers lived in the worst conditions, or were vagrant, and trying to fight for better pay resulted in being fired at best, or being beat up by corporate police. Not only did workers have basically no rights, but the very ''idea'' of workers having rights was laughed at. For Marx, this looked strikingly similar to what actual slaves were going through.[[/note]]

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** Some of Marx's criticism is overly harsh, (such as comparing factory work to literal slavery - which was ''actually still a thing'' while he was alive) but the actual conditions of VictorianBritain UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain were dire enough to make him see things that way. Engels' "Conditions of the Working Class in England" describing what England was like in the 1840s shows just how unbelievably miserable conditions were - Charles Dickens, if nothing, romanticized this misery.[[note]]To Marx and Engels, people were quite literally being dehumanized and turned into cogs for an economy machine that rich people profited off of; factories had no safety standards, all kinds of people - men, women, and children, were regularly killed or maimed by them, and these people were never compensated. They were paid such insubstantial wages that most workers lived in the worst conditions, or were vagrant, and trying to fight for better pay resulted in being fired at best, or being beat up by corporate police. Not only did workers have basically no rights, but the very ''idea'' of workers having rights was laughed at. For Marx, this looked strikingly similar to what actual slaves were going through.[[/note]]
11th May '17 1:56:53 AM LondonKdS
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''ComicStrip/RupertBear'', the Chinese Conjurer and Tiger Lily are very stereotypical, but also depicted as likable and good characters rather than YellowPeril villains. They are also drawn as people that human beings could believably look like, rather than as the kind of extreme ethnic caricatures seen in other strips of their era.
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