History Main / EveryHelicopterIsAHuey

28th Nov '17 6:44:33 PM Kadorhal
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* While enemy helicopters in ''Project I.G.I.'' are Hinds, as would be expected from the game being set around the old Soviet bloc, the player's organization itself are stuck with a Huey as their primary means of transport - despite all the other cool toys they have access to, including satellite maps that display the positions of guards in real-time and binoculars that tag any enemies in view.
21st Nov '17 5:47:11 PM Kadorhal
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It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type as a fire-bomber) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk]]. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the newest, highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model; it's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.

to:

It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type as a fire-bomber) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The jobs.[[note]]The Huey [[BoringButPractical costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk]]. It fuel, and can also fit into a much smaller landing zone.zone than a Blackhawk]]. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. [[/note]] The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the newest, highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model; it's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.



* A well-researched military movie will only feature Hueys as appropriate - for instance, when dealing with the Vietnam era, or for Marine Twin Hueys.

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* A well-researched military movie will only feature Hueys as appropriate - for instance, when dealing with the Vietnam era, or for Marine UH-1N Twin Hueys or UH-1Y Super Hueys.



When the Huey shows up appropriately - for example in period movies and situations where they'd likely be seen - it's just a sign the filmmakers [[ShownTheirWork did the research]]. Its appearance can also be justified as a deliberate stylistic choice where the moviemakers are trying to [[RuleOfSymbolism draw parallels]] between the events in the movie and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar: the rest of the time this trope applies. Then again, the Huey is [[RealityIsUnrealistic extremely popular in both the military and civilian worlds even today]], so it can be perfectly justified in many settings.

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When the Huey shows up appropriately - for example in period movies and situations where they'd likely be seen - it's just a sign the filmmakers [[ShownTheirWork did the research]]. Its appearance can also be justified as a deliberate stylistic choice where the moviemakers are trying to [[RuleOfSymbolism draw parallels]] between the events in the movie and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar: UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar - the rest of the time this trope applies. Then again, the Huey is [[RealityIsUnrealistic extremely popular in both the military and civilian worlds even today]], so it can be perfectly justified in many settings.



* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a civilian Bell 212 is operated by the Russians. It's probably [[WeaponsUnderstudies supposed to be]] one of the numerous Hueys inherited by the Vietnam People's Air Force after the Fall of Saigon, but the resemblance is superficial at best. Nor is any attempt made to dress up the pintle-mounted M60 (the E3 model first issued ) as a Soviet weapon.

to:

* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a civilian Bell 212 is operated by the Russians. It's probably [[WeaponsUnderstudies supposed to be]] one of the numerous Hueys inherited by the Vietnam People's Air Force after the Fall of Saigon, but the resemblance is superficial at best. Nor is any attempt made to dress up the pintle-mounted M60 (the E3 model first issued ) [[TheEighties at least a decade after the war]], at that) as a Soviet weapon.
18th Nov '17 3:44:56 PM Kadorhal
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-> '''Skroeder:''' ...and I'm going to need some Hueys.
-> '''Howard Marner:''' Some what?
-> '''Skroeder:''' ''HELICOPTERS'', Howard. Jesus Christ!
-> '''Howard Marner:''' I thought they were choppers.
-> '''Skroeder:''' Well, now they're called Hueys.
-> '''Howard Marner:''' Well, why wasn't I notified?

to:

-> '''Skroeder:''' ...->'''Skroeder:''' ...and I'm going to need some Hueys.
->
Hueys.\\
'''Howard Marner:''' Some what?
->
what?\\
'''Skroeder:''' ''HELICOPTERS'', Howard. Jesus Christ!
->
Christ!\\
'''Howard Marner:''' I thought they were choppers.
->
choppers.\\
'''Skroeder:''' Well, now they're called Hueys.
->
Hueys.\\
'''Howard Marner:''' Well, why wasn't I notified?



It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type as a fire-bomber) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk]]. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.

to:

It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type as a fire-bomber) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk]]. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the new and newest, highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's model; it's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.



* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a civilian Bell 212 is operated by the Russians. It's probably [[WeaponsUnderstudies supposed to be]] one of the numerous Hueys inherited by the Vietnam People's Air Force after the Fall of Saigon, but the resemblance is superficial at best. Nor is any attempt made to dress up the pintle-mounted M-60 (the E3 model first issued in the 80s no less!) as a Soviet weapon.

to:

* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a civilian Bell 212 is operated by the Russians. It's probably [[WeaponsUnderstudies supposed to be]] one of the numerous Hueys inherited by the Vietnam People's Air Force after the Fall of Saigon, but the resemblance is superficial at best. Nor is any attempt made to dress up the pintle-mounted M-60 M60 (the E3 model first issued in the 80s no less!) ) as a Soviet weapon.



* Owing to the source material being primarily influenced by UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, any time a helicopter shows up in the non-air-focused ''VideoGame/ArmyMen'' games, no matter the side or role, it is invariably a Huey. Even the games where the focus is on the helicopters start you off in a Huey, and friendly helicopters will likewise all be Hueys even as you've upgraded to Super Stallions or Apaches.

to:

* Owing to UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar behind one of the source material being primarily influenced by UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, primary influences on the plastic soldiers the series is based on, any time a helicopter shows up in the non-air-focused ''VideoGame/ArmyMen'' games, no matter the side or role, it is invariably a Huey. Even the games where the focus is on the helicopters start you off in a Huey, and friendly helicopters will likewise all be Hueys even as you've upgraded the player and the Tan forces upgrade to Blackhawks, Cobras, Super Stallions or and Apaches.
14th Sep '17 3:41:01 PM ElSquibbonator
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It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk]]. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.

to:

It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) as a fire-bomber) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk]]. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.



This trope is becoming less common as time goes on. More recent films tend to rely more on the Aérospatiale [=AS350=] Squirrel (or its two-engine counterpart, the [=AS355=] Twin Squirrel) as their go-to helicopter of choice. Its sleek look, especially when depicted in black, seems to lend itself to the slicker attitude of more modern action films.

to:

This trope is becoming less common as time goes on. More recent films tend to rely more on the Aérospatiale [=AS350=] Squirrel Ecuriel (or its two-engine counterpart, the [=AS355=] Twin Squirrel) Ecuriel) as their go-to helicopter of choice. Its sleek look, especially when depicted in black, seems to lend itself to the slicker attitude of more modern action films.
29th Aug '17 12:15:23 AM YT45
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It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]]The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.

to:

It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]]The jobs[[note]][[BoringButPractical The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk.Blackhawk]]. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role but are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.
23rd Apr '17 12:34:23 PM CaptEquinox
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Characters in action films are particularly prone to stumbling across them fuelled up, ready to fly and very often fully-armed (often as not with weapons no real Huey ever dreamed of carrying). This is pretty unlikely now, never mind TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, but even there [[AnachronismStew everyone will be flying Hueys]]. In action movies it's likely one of the cast will also [[SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat know how to pilot one]], however unlikely it is they'd have had any chance to learn how. In the few cases that the characters are ''not'' traveling in a Huey it's possible it'll still sound like they are, which is rather like suggesting every prop plane sounds like a Cessna. Perhaps because the UH-1 is so ubiquitous that [[TheCoconutEffect it's just how helicopters are expected to sound]].

to:

Characters in action films are particularly prone to stumbling across them fuelled up, ready to fly and very often fully-armed (often as not with weapons no real Huey ever dreamed of carrying). This is pretty unlikely now, never mind TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, but even there [[AnachronismStew everyone will be flying Hueys]]. In action movies it's likely one of the cast will also [[SuddenlyAlwaysKnewThat know how to pilot one]], however unlikely it is they'd have had any chance to learn how. In the few cases that the characters are ''not'' traveling in a Huey it's possible it'll still sound like they are, which is rather like suggesting every prop plane sounds like a Cessna. Perhaps because the UH-1 is so ubiquitous that [[TheCoconutEffect it's just how helicopters are expected to sound]]. \n [[note]]The same is true of the ''chirp chirp chirp'' sound as a film or TV copter -- Huey or otherwise -- powers down. Only [[http://www.century-of-flight.net/Aviation%20history/helicopter%20history/M.A.S.H.%20Medevac%20Helicopters.htm the Bell 47G Med-Evac]] that you see on ''Series/{{MASH}}'' really makes this sound as its drive belts disengage, but the chirping has become iconic, and so it's occasionally added in.[[/note]]
8th Apr '17 5:23:06 PM Jake
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* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a 212 is operated by the Russians. While it could be claimed as being on loan from Vietnamese forces inherited from the ARVN, it was not employed by the ARVN (it also mounts an [=M60E3=] machine gun, introduced in the 1980s, long after the Fall of Saigon), and is a civilian 212, not a military UH-1N.

to:

* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a civilian Bell 212 is operated by the Russians. While it could be claimed as being on loan from Vietnamese forces It's probably [[WeaponsUnderstudies supposed to be]] one of the numerous Hueys inherited from the ARVN, it was not employed by the ARVN (it also mounts an [=M60E3=] machine gun, introduced in the 1980s, long Vietnam People's Air Force after the Fall of Saigon), and Saigon, but the resemblance is superficial at best. Nor is any attempt made to dress up the pintle-mounted M-60 (the E3 model first issued in the 80s no less!) as a civilian 212, not a military UH-1N.Soviet weapon.
27th Mar '17 7:43:29 AM gravious
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-->-- '''Film/ShortCircuit'''


to:

-->-- '''Film/ShortCircuit'''

''Film/ShortCircuit''

27th Mar '17 7:40:06 AM gravious
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Added DiffLines:

-> '''Skroeder:''' ...and I'm going to need some Hueys.
-> '''Howard Marner:''' Some what?
-> '''Skroeder:''' ''HELICOPTERS'', Howard. Jesus Christ!
-> '''Howard Marner:''' I thought they were choppers.
-> '''Skroeder:''' Well, now they're called Hueys.
-> '''Howard Marner:''' Well, why wasn't I notified?
-->-- '''Film/ShortCircuit'''

18th Jan '17 4:59:26 PM mlsmithca
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** {{YMMV}}, but this could very well be justified by the fact that Hueys are both extremely reliable and less maintenance-intensive (not to mention much easier to fix when they do break, and their ubiquitousness means spare parts would be easier to scavenge) than newer designs. If you want a helicopter to keep running AfterTheEnd, that helicopter most likely ''would'' be a Huey.
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