History Main / EveryHelicopterIsAHuey

27th Aug '16 6:39:03 AM YT45
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When the Huey shows up appropriately - for example in period movies and situations where they'd likely be seen - it's just a sign the filmmakers [[ShownTheirWork did the research]]. Its appearance can also be justified as a deliberate stylistic choice where the moviemakers are trying to [[RuleOfSymbolism draw parallels]] between the events in the movie and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar: the rest of the time this trope applies.

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When the Huey shows up appropriately - for example in period movies and situations where they'd likely be seen - it's just a sign the filmmakers [[ShownTheirWork did the research]]. Its appearance can also be justified as a deliberate stylistic choice where the moviemakers are trying to [[RuleOfSymbolism draw parallels]] between the events in the movie and UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar: the rest of the time this trope applies.
applies. Then again, the Huey is [[RealityIsUnrealistic extremely popular in both the military and civilian worlds even today]], so it can be perfectly justified in many settings.
18th Jul '16 6:25:57 PM WillKeaton
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* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a 212 is operated by the Russians. While it could be claimed as being on loan from Vietnamese forces inherited from the ARVN, it (and the M60E3 machine gun) is a model introduced after the Fall of Saigon in 1975, and a civilian 212, not a military UH-1.
* The high-tech helicopter gunships that attack Bruce Banner in the Ang Lee ''Film/Hulk Hulk'' movie are ''not'' Hueys... but General Ross is co-ordinating the operation from one. This is rather like seeing [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-35_Lightning_II F-35 Lightning IIs]] being led into battle by a prop-engined [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC-47_Spooky AC-47]].

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* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' a 212 is operated by the Russians. While it could be claimed as being on loan from Vietnamese forces inherited from the ARVN, it (and the M60E3 [=M60E3=] machine gun) is a model introduced after the Fall of Saigon in 1975, and a civilian 212, not a military UH-1.
* The high-tech helicopter gunships that attack Bruce Banner in the Ang Lee ''Film/Hulk Hulk'' movie are ''not'' Hueys... but General Ross is co-ordinating the operation from one. This is rather like seeing [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-35_Lightning_II F-35 Lightning IIs]] being led into battle by a prop-engined [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC-47_Spooky AC-47]].AC-47.]]
9th Jul '16 7:31:01 PM AnotherDuck
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Added DiffLines:

2nd Jul '16 5:06:25 PM maxwellsilver
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* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' features two Hueys, one operated by the PrivateMilitaryContractors in the bogus extraction, and one (inexplicably) as a gunship by the Russians.
** The latter aircraft may have been on loan from the Vietnam People's Air Force, who inherited a number of ex-South Vietnamese UH-1s and still have about fifteen of them in service.
* The high-tech helicopter gunships that attack Bruce Banner in the Ang Lee ''[[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/Hulk Hulk]]'' movie are ''not'' Hueys... but General Ross is co-ordinating the operation from one. This is rather like seeing [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-35_Lightning_II F-35 Lightning IIs]] being led into battle by a prop-engined [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC-47_Spooky AC-47]].

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* ''Film/RamboFirstBloodPartII'' features two Hueys, one a 212 is operated by the PrivateMilitaryContractors in the bogus extraction, and one (inexplicably) Russians. While it could be claimed as a gunship by the Russians.
** The latter aircraft may have been
being on loan from the Vietnam People's Air Force, who inherited a number of ex-South Vietnamese UH-1s forces inherited from the ARVN, it (and the M60E3 machine gun) is a model introduced after the Fall of Saigon in 1975, and still have about fifteen of them in service.
a civilian 212, not a military UH-1.
* The high-tech helicopter gunships that attack Bruce Banner in the Ang Lee ''[[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/Hulk Hulk]]'' ''Film/Hulk Hulk'' movie are ''not'' Hueys... but General Ross is co-ordinating the operation from one. This is rather like seeing [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-35_Lightning_II F-35 Lightning IIs]] being led into battle by a prop-engined [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC-47_Spooky AC-47]].
2nd Jul '16 4:58:54 PM maxwellsilver
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* Justified usage in pretty much every single movie about UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar ever made.
** Many other types of helicopter-- H-34 Choctaws, SH-3 Sea Kings, CH-47 Chinooks, CH-46 Sea Knights and OH-6 Cayuses--were also in regular use in Vietnam, though they're considerably less likely to show up in films.
20th Jun '16 11:24:02 AM gewunomox
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* The BillyJoel song ''Goodnight Saigon'' starts as it means to go on by opening with [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar the sound of the jungle and the Huey's very distinctive engine note]]. It's almost a minute later by the time the ''song'' actually starts.

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* The BillyJoel Music/BillyJoel song ''Goodnight Saigon'' starts as it means to go on by opening with [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar the sound of the jungle and the Huey's very distinctive engine note]]. It's almost a minute later by the time the ''song'' actually starts.
13th Apr '16 2:26:04 PM CaptEquinox
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* ''Series/{{MASH}}'' mostly averted this in favor of the historically-accurate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_47 Bell 47]]. However, some early episodes have a model Huey hanging from the ceiling of Col. Blake's office, and later on the O Club has a sign on the wall reading "4077th Med. Co. Air Ambulance" and featuring an illustration of either a Huey or another Vietnam-era chopper.

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* ''Series/{{MASH}}'' mostly averted this in favor of the historically-accurate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_47 Bell 47]]. 47]] [[note]]the only helicopter that really goes chirp-chirp-chirp as its drive belts disengage. Now they all do it.[[/note]] However, some early episodes have a model Huey hanging from the ceiling of Col. Blake's office, and later on the O Club has a sign on the wall reading "4077th Med. Co. Air Ambulance" and featuring an illustration of either a Huey or another Vietnam-era chopper.
12th Feb '16 12:45:59 PM erforce
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This trope is becoming less common as time goes on. More recent films tend to rely more on the Aérospatiale [=AS350=] Squirrel (or its two-engine counterpart, the [=AS355=] Twin Squirrel) as their go-to helicopter of choice. Its sleek look, especially when depicted in black, seems to lend itself to the slicker attitude of more modern action films. Examples include ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard'' (which does feature some Hueys but primarily uses Squirrels), three out of the four live-action ''Film/ResidentEvil'' movies (''Apocalypse'', ''Extinction'' and ''Afterlife''), ''TheOtherGuys'' and ''{{Shooter}}''.

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This trope is becoming less common as time goes on. More recent films tend to rely more on the Aérospatiale [=AS350=] Squirrel (or its two-engine counterpart, the [=AS355=] Twin Squirrel) as their go-to helicopter of choice. Its sleek look, especially when depicted in black, seems to lend itself to the slicker attitude of more modern action films. Examples include ''Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard'' (which does feature some Hueys but primarily uses Squirrels), three out of the four live-action ''Film/ResidentEvil'' ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' movies (''Apocalypse'', ''Extinction'' (''[[Film/ResidentEvilApocalypse Apocalypse]]'', ''[[Film/ResidentEvilExtinction Extinction]]'' and ''Afterlife''), ''TheOtherGuys'' ''[[Film/ResidentEvilAfterlife Afterlife]]''), ''Film/TheOtherGuys'' and ''{{Shooter}}''.
''Film/{{Shooter}}''.
13th Jan '16 9:05:46 PM YT45
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It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]]The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role But are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.

to:

It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) to VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]]The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps, who not only still use them in a front-line role But but are also currently taking delivery of the new and highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.
13th Jan '16 9:04:30 PM YT45
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It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility and ready availability as surplus has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage, though certainly not to the extent that militarized Hueys do due to not having the same stranglehold on the market - or the public's imagination. Though in RealLife the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as long ago as 1979[[note]] The US Marine Corps still uses Hueys and is still taking delivery of the newest Y model[[/note]] and many other armed forces never used them at all, in the movies they still show up everywhere even now - even places they have no right to be. As a general rule:

to:

It's not only military action movies that favor the Huey. Their versatility and versatility, reliability, ready availability as surplus surplus, low cost, and ease of maintenance has them showing up pretty much every other time a helicopter's needed as well. Hence Bell 204/205/212 helicopters, all civilian Hueys, see very heavy usage, though certainly not usage for everything from logging to firefighting (it's definitely the extent that militarized Hueys do due single most popular type for Fire/Rescue work) to not having VIP transport, with Bell continuing to roll new ones off the same stranglehold on the market - or the public's imagination. assembly line even after fifty years in production. Though in RealLife the US Army started replacing Hueys with Black Hawks as the general-purpose transport helicopter as long ago as 1979[[note]] 1979, they still keep a lot of them flying for various odd jobs[[note]]The Huey costs less to operate, requires less maintenance per flight hour, and burns less fuel than a Blackhawk. It can also fit into a much smaller landing zone. The US new Y-model even has greater sling-load lifting capability than the Blackhawk.[[/note]]. The same is true of the other branches, except the Marine Corps Corps, who not only still uses Hueys and is still use them in a front-line role But are also currently taking delivery of the newest Y model[[/note]] new and many other armed forces never used them at all, highly-advanced [=UH-1Y=] model. It's commonly said in the US Military that when the last Blackhawk is deleted from the inventory, it will be slingloaded to the Boneyard by a Huey.

In
the movies they still show up everywhere even now - even places they have no right to be.be, in countries that never flew them. As a general rule:
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EveryHelicopterIsAHuey