History Main / EndOfAnAge

28th Mar '17 6:58:24 PM nombretomado
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* ''OpenBlue'''s BackStory has the Iormunean Imperium, {{precursors}} (based on the Roman Empire) who were more or less the greatest civilization in the world... until they turned a blind eye to some heretics, causing their goddes to turn her back on them while they were in the middle of a war against invading barbarians.

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* ''OpenBlue'''s ''Roleplay/OpenBlue'''s BackStory has the Iormunean Imperium, {{precursors}} (based on the Roman Empire) who were more or less the greatest civilization in the world... until they turned a blind eye to some heretics, causing their goddes to turn her back on them while they were in the middle of a war against invading barbarians.



* WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee discusses a lot how internet criticism is one day going to die, but in the end this is seen as cynical nonsense while "we're a family" wins out.

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* WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' discusses a lot how internet criticism is one day going to die, but in the end this is seen as cynical nonsense while "we're a family" wins out.
28th Mar '17 3:50:08 PM LentilSandEater
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* ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' has this. First came the age of the faeries, featuring various magical nature spirits, which ended in apocalypse. Second was the modern, technological age, which also ended in apocalypse. The third, current age is one mainly of magic, although the lost technology from the past shows up occasionally, and the most recent books have solar powered airships.
** That is, sailing ships that use [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sunlight focused]] [[{{Magitek}} through crystals]] to levitate and billow[[CoolAirship the sail.]]

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* ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' has this. First came the age of the faeries, featuring various magical nature spirits, which ended in apocalypse. Second was the modern, technological age, which also ended in apocalypse. The third, current age is one mainly of magic, although the lost technology from the past shows up occasionally, and the most recent books have solar powered airships.
**
airships. That is, sailing ships that use [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sunlight focused]] [[{{Magitek}} through crystals]] to levitate and billow[[CoolAirship billow [[CoolAirship the sail.]]
28th Mar '17 3:43:47 PM LentilSandEater
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* In ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'' might be considered the last gasp of the age of, well, sourcery. Magic, and the humans who wield it, have been considerably scaled down since then, making things less wondrous but a hell of a lot safer.
** The events of ''Sourcery'' also killed off many of the most powerful and dangerous wizards which lead to Ridcully becoming Archchancellor and ending the age of KlingonPromotion among the wizards. The wizards become more laid back, less aggressive and more scholarly wizards were able to rise to positions of power.

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* In ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'',
**
''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'' might be considered the last gasp of the age of, well, sourcery. Magic, and the humans who wield it, have been considerably scaled down since then, making things less wondrous but a hell of a lot safer.
**
safer. The events of ''Sourcery'' also killed off many of the most powerful and dangerous wizards which lead to Ridcully becoming Archchancellor and ending the age of KlingonPromotion among the wizards. The wizards become more laid back, less aggressive and more scholarly wizards were able to rise to positions of power.
20th Mar '17 4:27:32 AM JamesAustin
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* Creator/DavidLetterman's announcement in April 2014 that he'd retire from hosting ''The Late Show'' in 2015 (his final show aired May 20, 2015) led some to believe it marks the end of an age in late night television stretching as far back as TheSixties, when Johnny Carson began hosting ''Series/TheTonightShow''.

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* 20142015 was considered to contain the end of an age for several types of late night shows:
**
Creator/DavidLetterman's announcement in April 2014 that he'd retire from hosting ''The Late Show'' in 2015 (his final show aired May 20, 2015) led some to believe it marks the end of an age in late night television stretching as far back as TheSixties, when Johnny Carson began hosting ''Series/TheTonightShow''.



** Jon Stewart's announcement in February 2015 that he'll retire from hosting ''Series/TheDailyShow'' later that year (his final show as host aired August 6, 2015) signifies the end of an age of satire that started with the UsefulNotes/BillClinton presidency in TheNineties. Of course, Creator/JohnOliver with his own hit, and even more unrestrained, satire show, ''Series/LastWeekTonightWithJohnOliver'', disagrees.

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** Jon Stewart's Creator/JonStewart's announcement in February 2015 that he'll retire from hosting ''Series/TheDailyShow'' later that year (his final show as host aired August 6, 2015) signifies the end of an age of satire that started with the UsefulNotes/BillClinton presidency in TheNineties. Of course, Creator/JohnOliver with his own hit, and even more unrestrained, satire show, ''Series/LastWeekTonightWithJohnOliver'', disagrees.
16th Mar '17 10:43:41 PM DavidDelony
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** The [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/professor-thomas-weber-/strongmen-trump-liberal-world-order_b_9661636.html re-emergence of political strongmen]] in the early 21st Century such as Creator/DonaldTrump in America, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin in UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}, Recep Tayip Erdogan in UsefulNotes/{{Turkey}}, and various populist nationalist leaders in Europe, is believed to have dealt a blow to the liberal democracy of the post-ColdWar period as described by Francis Fukuyama in "The End of History". Hostility towards international treatise-based economies, disillusion towards migrants, and a desire to return to isolationalism may spell an end to globalized communities. Fukuyama himself has revisited the topic [[http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/magazine/america-the-failed-state-donald-trump with a noticeably gloomier outlook from his End of History thesis]].

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** The [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/professor-thomas-weber-/strongmen-trump-liberal-world-order_b_9661636.html re-emergence of political strongmen]] in the early 21st Century such as Creator/DonaldTrump in America, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin in UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}, Recep Tayip Erdogan in UsefulNotes/{{Turkey}}, and various populist nationalist leaders in Europe, is believed to have dealt a blow to the liberal democracy of the post-ColdWar period as described by Francis Fukuyama in "The End of History". Hostility towards international treatise-based treaty-based economies, disillusion disdain towards migrants, and a desire to return to isolationalism may spell an end to globalized communities. Fukuyama himself has revisited the topic [[http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/magazine/america-the-failed-state-donald-trump with a noticeably gloomier outlook from his End of History thesis]].
12th Mar '17 1:36:53 AM Morgenthaler
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** On top of that, the Global Financial Crisis, a.k.a. the 'Great Recession', of 2008 onwards could be heralding the beginning of the end of the neo-liberal financial sector dominance that was spearheaded by MargaretThatcher and RonaldReagan. What sets the GFC apart from previous recessions is that large financial institutions that managed to survive TheGreatDepression of the 1930s and subsequent recessions, and heavily benefited from deregulation in the 1980s, were at the heart of the crisis. In fact, David Smick of the [[AmericanNewspapers Washington Post]] wrote in 2012 that the "[[http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/what-will-replace-the-globalization-model/2012/10/16/57cf62da-0e6d-11e2-bd1a-b868e65d57eb_story.html globalization model of the past 30 years is cracking up. And there appears to be no new model to replace it.]]"

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** On top of that, the Global Financial Crisis, a.k.a. the 'Great Recession', of 2008 onwards could be heralding the beginning of the end of the neo-liberal financial sector dominance that was spearheaded by MargaretThatcher UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher and RonaldReagan.UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan. What sets the GFC apart from previous recessions is that large financial institutions that managed to survive TheGreatDepression of the 1930s and subsequent recessions, and heavily benefited from deregulation in the 1980s, were at the heart of the crisis. In fact, David Smick of the [[AmericanNewspapers Washington Post]] wrote in 2012 that the "[[http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/what-will-replace-the-globalization-model/2012/10/16/57cf62da-0e6d-11e2-bd1a-b868e65d57eb_story.html globalization model of the past 30 years is cracking up. And there appears to be no new model to replace it.]]"
7th Mar '17 3:27:17 PM Kuroguma
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* Culturally, ethnically and linguistically, the fall of the Western Roman Empire created a ''huge'' shift in the general population of Western Europe, which happened far more gradually than the political and military changes, but were arguably much farther-reaching. For most of the Roman Empire's heyday, Western Europe was politically dominated by the Romans of Southern Europe, though most of the region was culturally dominated by various indigenous peoples who could be broadly described as "Celtic" (though that term was invented by Greek historians, and they never called themselves "Celts"). After Rome's legions deserted them, the Celtic peoples of Western Europe were suddenly at the mercy of the far more aggressive "Germanic" peoples of Central Europe, who became ''the'' predominant cultural force in the region within a few centuries. To this day, the region formerly known as "Gaul" is known as "France" (after the Franks), while two of its largest regions are known as "Lombardy" and "Normandy" (after the Lombards and the Normans), and the country on the Northern side of the English Channel is called "England" (after the Angles), with "Anglo-" being a universally recognized prefix for all things English. As a result of centuries of invasions by the Angles, Saxons and Normans, the Germanic-derived language of "English" is now the most widely-spoken language in the world, with the Celtic-derived tongues of "Irish", "Scots" and "Welsh" spoken only by a handful of faithful devotees. English-speakers even still refer to the days of the week by names derived from the gods of the Norse pantheon, which was shared by the Anglo-Saxons. [[note]] "Tuesday" is "Tyr's Day", "Wednesday" is "Wodan's Day", "Thursday" is "Thor's Day", and "Friday" is "Freya's Day".[[/note]]

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* Culturally, ethnically and linguistically, the fall of the Western Roman Empire created a ''huge'' shift in the general population of Western Europe, which happened far more gradually than the political and military changes, but were arguably much farther-reaching. For most of the Roman Empire's heyday, Western Europe was politically dominated by the Romans of Southern Europe, though most of the region was culturally dominated by various indigenous peoples who could be broadly described as "Celtic" (though that term was invented by Greek historians, and they never called themselves "Celts"). After Rome's legions deserted them, the Celtic peoples of Western Europe were suddenly at the mercy of the far more aggressive "Germanic" peoples of Central Europe, who became ''the'' predominant cultural force in the region within a few centuries. To this day, the region formerly known as "Gaul" is known as "France" (after the Franks), while two of its largest regions are known as "Lombardy" and "Normandy" (after the Lombards and the Normans), and the country on the Northern side of the English Channel is called "England" (after the Angles), with "Anglo-" being a universally recognized prefix for all things English. As a result of centuries of invasions by the Angles, Saxons and Normans, the Germanic-derived language of "English" is now the most widely-spoken language in the world, with the Celtic-derived tongues of "Irish", "Scots" "Scottish Gaelic" and "Welsh" spoken only by a handful of faithful devotees. English-speakers even still refer to the days of the week by names derived from the gods of the Norse pantheon, which was shared by the Anglo-Saxons. [[note]] "Tuesday" is "Tyr's Day", "Wednesday" is "Wodan's Day", "Thursday" is "Thor's Day", and "Friday" is "Freya's Day".[[/note]]
2nd Mar '17 1:44:32 PM Random888
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* In the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' series, there is an ongoing theme that the end is near for the era of WoodenShipsAndIronMen - an age of freedom and adventure that has been memorialized ever since. The [[TrilogyCreep seemingly unstoppable progression of sequels]] has rendered this theme somewhat awkward and ironic.

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* In the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' series, there is an ongoing theme that the end is near for the era of WoodenShipsAndIronMen - an age of freedom and adventure that has been memorialized ever since. Indeed, the series takes place [[AnachronismStew vaguely]] in an early-to-mid 18th century setting, the very end of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfPiracy. The [[TrilogyCreep seemingly unstoppable progression of sequels]] has rendered this theme somewhat awkward and ironic.
2nd Mar '17 1:12:12 PM Random888
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* This was touched on in the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' sequels. There is an interpretation that the whole trilogy deals with the end of the era of WoodenShipsAndIronMen - an age of freedom and adventure that has been memorialized ever since. (The [[TrilogyCreep seemingly unstoppable progression of sequels]] has rendered this theme somewhat awkward and ironic.)

to:

* This was touched on in In the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' sequels. There series, there is an interpretation ongoing theme that the whole trilogy deals with the end of is near for the era of WoodenShipsAndIronMen - an age of freedom and adventure that has been memorialized ever since. (The The [[TrilogyCreep seemingly unstoppable progression of sequels]] has rendered this theme somewhat awkward and ironic.)ironic.
** In ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl'', the ''Black Pearl'' is briefly referred to as "the last real pirate threat in the Caribbean".
2nd Mar '17 1:07:30 PM Random888
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* This was touched on in the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' sequels. There is an interpretation that the whole trilogy deals with the end of the era of WoodenShipsAndIronMen - an age of freedom and adventure that has been memorialized ever since.

to:

* This was touched on in the ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' sequels. There is an interpretation that the whole trilogy deals with the end of the era of WoodenShipsAndIronMen - an age of freedom and adventure that has been memorialized ever since. (The [[TrilogyCreep seemingly unstoppable progression of sequels]] has rendered this theme somewhat awkward and ironic.)
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