History Main / EmpathicWeapon

16th Jun '16 10:37:20 PM Liamdurf
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'': The Omnitrix has a mind of its own -- possibly more than one. It will often turn Ben into an alien other than the one he's trying to become, and has a tendency to act in self-defense by zapping bad guys who try to tear it from Ben's wrist. Ben doesn't ask it for help so much as argue with it when it acts up. You could probably even say that the Omnitrix is trying to ''teach'' Ben something. His usual plan is to turn into Fourarms and just smack everything around until the problem's solved; forcing him to use other, more complicated aliens like Grey Matter and Cannonbolt is a good way to make him fight more strategically. It also seems to dislike being removed from Ben's wrist. It seems almost happy and enthusiastic when it jumps back on him after being removed in the season two finale, and after being stuck in the bottom of Ben's closet for [[TimeSkip 5 years]], it refuses to work, and the watchface turns blue [[note]]Forget the Blue Screen of Death; that watch was just ''feeling blue''.[[/note]] When Vilgax later steals it during ''[[WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce Alien Force]]'', the watch refuses to work for him... until ''Ben'' presses the dial in a TrickingTheShapeshifter plan. Even though removing the watch is now possible in the sequel series, Azmuth still seems sulkily resigned to the fact that Ben must be the wielder of his invention; [[Literature/HarryPotter the wand chooses the wizard]], and the Omnitrix [[TheChosenOne chooses its owner]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'': The Omnitrix has a mind of its own -- possibly more than one. It will often turn Ben into an alien other than the one he's trying to become, and has a tendency to act in self-defense by zapping bad guys who try to tear it from Ben's wrist. Ben doesn't ask it for help so much as argue with it when it acts up. You could probably even say that the Omnitrix is trying to ''teach'' Ben something. His usual plan is to turn into Fourarms and just smack everything around until the problem's solved; forcing him to use other, more complicated aliens like Grey Matter and Cannonbolt is a good way to make him fight more strategically. It also seems to dislike being removed from Ben's wrist. It seems almost happy and enthusiastic when it jumps back on him after being removed in the season two finale, and after being stuck in the bottom of Ben's closet for [[TimeSkip 5 years]], it refuses to work, and the watchface turns blue [[note]]Forget the Blue Screen of Death; that watch was just ''feeling blue''.[[/note]] When Vilgax later steals it during ''[[WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce Alien Force]]'', the watch refuses to work for him... until ''Ben'' presses the dial in a TrickingTheShapeshifter plan. Even though removing the watch is now possible in the sequel series, Azmuth still seems sulkily resigned to the fact that Ben must be the wielder of his invention; [[Literature/HarryPotter the wand chooses the wizard]], and the Omnitrix [[TheChosenOne chooses its owner]].invention.
31st May '16 3:40:14 AM Doug86
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* In AndreNorton's ''[[Literature/{{Warlock}} Forerunner Foray]]'', the artifact Ziantha found is able to manipulate people about. Ziantha deduces it springs from its being used by sensitives for generations.

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* In AndreNorton's Creator/AndreNorton's ''[[Literature/{{Warlock}} Forerunner Foray]]'', the artifact Ziantha found is able to manipulate people about. Ziantha deduces it springs from its being used by sensitives for generations.
19th May '16 4:28:45 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' has Mjolnir, which as per canon only lets those who are worthy wield it, such as Thor, Steve [[NoodleIncident (who, totally unaware of the significance, ]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny used it as a doorstop)]] and [[spoiler: Diana.]]
** Then there's Alan Scott's Green Lantern Ring. No one's entirely sure how smart it is, but based on Strange's remarks, it's smart enough to form opinions on people.
** All wands are this to one degree or another, as is the Sword of Gryffindor.
19th May '16 3:39:48 PM falsebooles123
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* "Webcomic/TheLastHalloween": The weapon of the main character follows this trope, in several scenes actually following her and levitating into her hand.
4th May '16 11:12:55 PM JackG
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If the weapon communicates actively with the characters, it is instead a TalkingWeapon.

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If the weapon communicates actively with the characters, it is instead a TalkingWeapon.
TalkingWeapon. May be a literal SmartGun.
4th May '16 11:10:21 PM JackG
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* In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Warhead," the series 5 long-range tactical armor unit counts as one. It's been launched accidentally, so Voyager's crew have to talk it out of exploding.

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* In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Warhead," the series 5 long-range tactical armor unit counts as one. It's been launched accidentally, so Voyager's crew have to talk it out of exploding. It's even been programmed with propaganda on the enemy to motivate it.
4th May '16 4:04:23 PM Piando
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* The Avengers film ''Film/AgeOfUltron'' has a scene in which various Avengers (all of whom are drunk at the time) try to lift Mjolnir; Tony Stark tries, fails, and then puts on his Iron Man glove and ''still'' fails; he and War Machine then try to lift it ''together'' and can't budge it. The Hulk (who is in Bruce form at the time, but as stated in the Comic Books section, strength doesn't matter) can't move it. Even Captain America can't wield it (though he does manage to ''lift'' it slightly, and Thor's reaction suggests that was a lot closer than Thor was expecting). However, later someone other than Thor ''does'' lift it: [[spoiler: while the Avengers are trying to decide whether to trust the Vision or not, Vision]] casually picks it up and hands it to Thor before heading out. After a few moments of stunned silence from everyone, Thor says "right" and follows, followed in turn by everyone else.

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* The Avengers film ''Film/AgeOfUltron'' ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'' has a scene in which various Avengers (all of whom are drunk at the time) try to lift Mjolnir; Tony Stark tries, fails, and then puts on his Iron Man glove and ''still'' fails; he and War Machine then try to lift it ''together'' and can't budge it. The Hulk (who is in Bruce form at the time, but as stated in the Comic Books section, strength doesn't matter) can't move it. Even Captain America can't wield it (though he does manage to ''lift'' it slightly, and Thor's reaction suggests that was a lot closer than Thor was expecting). However, later someone other than Thor ''does'' lift it: [[spoiler: while the Avengers are trying to decide whether to trust the Vision or not, Vision]] casually picks it up and hands it to Thor before heading out. After a few moments of stunned silence from everyone, Thor says "right" and follows, followed in turn by everyone else.
6th Apr '16 1:13:26 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The ''VideoGame/SakuraWars'' TV series:

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* The ''VideoGame/SakuraWars'' [[Anime/SakuraWarsTV TV series:series]]:
30th Mar '16 1:43:46 AM Tron80
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* ''Anime/PanzerWorldGalient'': The titular mecha often feels its pilot's distress and reacts, acting off its own accord to protect or save Jordy.
18th Mar '16 7:39:43 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''EarthFinalConflict'', the ''skrill'' are bio-engineered weapons fused to a human operator's forearm, and which draw upon the operator's own blood supply -- so rapid use can cause the human to pass out. In fact, and not generally known to the characters, the skrill were originally an independent sapient lifeform; and despite the best efforts of the Taelons to eradicate that sapience, they sometimes communicate with their hosts.

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* In ''EarthFinalConflict'', ''Series/EarthFinalConflict'', the ''skrill'' are bio-engineered weapons fused to a human operator's forearm, and which draw upon the operator's own blood supply -- so rapid use can cause the human to pass out. In fact, and not generally known to the characters, the skrill were originally an independent sapient lifeform; and despite the best efforts of the Taelons to eradicate that sapience, they sometimes communicate with their hosts.



** ''RogueTrader'' reveals that even Imperial starships have personalities of some sort. Not AIs persay, but ships seem to have definite preferences (ex. some are constantly itching for battle, others will do anything to get away from a fight.)

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** ''RogueTrader'' ''TabletopGame/RogueTrader'' reveals that even Imperial starships have personalities of some sort. Not AIs persay, but ships seem to have definite preferences (ex. some are constantly itching for battle, others will do anything to get away from a fight.)



* Asgard from ''{{Wild ARMs}}'' activates only when Cecilia shows understanding of its purpose and reluctance to fulfill that purpose. Cecilia also shows respect for it by asking it for help rather than forcefully controlling it. To a minor degree, the titular [=ARMs=] of the series also qualify, as they're usually portrayed as only usable by certain people who have the capacity to attune their bodies and spirits to them.
* ''{{Suikoden}}'' uses this trope quite a lot:

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* Asgard from ''{{Wild ''VideoGame/{{Wild ARMs}}'' activates only when Cecilia shows understanding of its purpose and reluctance to fulfill that purpose. Cecilia also shows respect for it by asking it for help rather than forcefully controlling it. To a minor degree, the titular [=ARMs=] of the series also qualify, as they're usually portrayed as only usable by certain people who have the capacity to attune their bodies and spirits to them.
* ''{{Suikoden}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'' uses this trope quite a lot:



* ''KingdomHearts''

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* ''KingdomHearts'' ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts''



* ''BaldursGate''

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* ''BaldursGate''''VideoGame/BaldursGate''



* ''KingsBounty'' features a great deal of weapons and other items that are emphatic, which is expressed in their "morale" value. For example, a dragonslayer sword likes to fight dragons (duh) and using it for other fights lowers its morale until it refuses to provide its benefits until the morale increases either by killing a dragon or "suppressing" it, which is done through a special fight. Some items can also be upgraded through such fights.

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* ''KingsBounty'' ''VideoGame/KingsBounty'' features a great deal of weapons and other items that are emphatic, which is expressed in their "morale" value. For example, a dragonslayer sword likes to fight dragons (duh) and using it for other fights lowers its morale until it refuses to provide its benefits until the morale increases either by killing a dragon or "suppressing" it, which is done through a special fight. Some items can also be upgraded through such fights.



* In the Myth/NorseMythology influenced {{Cyberpunk}} game ''TooHuman'' Baldur's melee weapon (it can be reforged into practically anything), Fenrir, is a bloodthirsty AI imprisoned in a weapon. It can be heard snarling as Tyr holds it.

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* In the Myth/NorseMythology influenced {{Cyberpunk}} game ''TooHuman'' ''VideoGame/TooHuman'' Baldur's melee weapon (it can be reforged into practically anything), Fenrir, is a bloodthirsty AI imprisoned in a weapon. It can be heard snarling as Tyr holds it.
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