History Main / EducationMama

15th Jan '17 3:44:55 PM TheBushranger
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[[caption-width-right:339: There's a [[HiddenDepths good]] [[DarkSecret reason]] for that, Nanase.]]
11th Jan '17 5:54:27 AM Elfkaiser
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}'', Beatrix's mother in her lore apparently was quite the Tiger Mom. Excerpts from her diary from the lore in [[https://forums.gearboxsoftware.com/t/battleplan-32-12-22-16/1552633 Battleplan 32]] reveal her mother, a Silent Sister, constantly pushed Beatrix to apply herself in her studies. As Beatrix was quite the TeenGenius who was excelling in her grades, her mother negotiated her early graduation and as such Beatrix graduated from Archsciences Academy at 14 years old, the youngest ever to do so. However, even then that wasn't enough as Beatrix's mother later applied her in grad school. All of this was to make Beatrix a candidate for sustainment before she died of her illness though her mother did so without really asking Beatrix herself what she really wanted.
30th Dec '16 7:53:01 PM JoieDeCombat
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* In ''[[Series/TheLibrarians2014 The Librarians]'' "And the Rule of Three," Cassandra bonds with a teen named Amy Meyer over their mutual experiences with parents who place academic success over everything else: no dates, no movies, no social life, no hobbies that don't look good on a college application, and so forth. Amy's mother spends most of the episode shamelessly making herself obnoxious in pushing for Amy to win at the STEM fair, until Amy finally tells her bluntly that it's ''her'' life, not her mother's.

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* In ''[[Series/TheLibrarians2014 The Librarians]'' Librarians]]'' "And the Rule of Three," Cassandra bonds with a teen named Amy Meyer over their mutual experiences with parents who place academic success over everything else: no dates, no movies, no social life, no hobbies that don't look good on a college application, and so forth. Amy's mother spends most of the episode shamelessly making herself obnoxious in pushing for Amy to win at the STEM fair, until Amy finally tells her bluntly that it's ''her'' life, not her mother's.
30th Dec '16 7:51:37 PM JoieDeCombat
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* In ''[[Series/TheLibrarians2014 The Librarians]'' "And the Rule of Three," Cassandra bonds with a teen named Amy Meyer over their mutual experiences with parents who place academic success over everything else: no dates, no movies, no social life, no hobbies that don't look good on a college application, and so forth. Amy's mother spends most of the episode shamelessly making herself obnoxious in pushing for Amy to win at the STEM fair, until Amy finally tells her bluntly that it's ''her'' life, not her mother's.
6th Dec '16 9:49:02 PM KizunaTallis
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* Another tragic example comes from Jennifer Pan, a Canadian-born Vietnamese girl who ordered a pair of hitmen to kill her parents. She cited the intense school schedule and unrealistic expectations they placed on her as well as her utter fear of punishment for failures, which led to her spinning a very long and complex web of lies to keep them from knowing that she failed a class as the reason.
13th Nov '16 9:02:31 PM Valiona
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** Takagi's mother is this, for which he consistently scored top in his school, but the pressure of it all leading him to rebel by choosing a career in manga. This was confronted early in the series when he said he's go to the same cheap college as Mashiro so he could skip classes when needed and focus on writing manga. It's implied that she wanted him to study so that he can "avenge" his father, who was fired from his job after TakingTheHeat for his boss. However, when he called her out on this, she was apparently willing to allow him to live as he wanted. His mother apparently has no such standards for Akito's older brother, who is fooling around in college around the start of the series.
** Mashiro's mother also follows this in the early parts of the series; she's the only one in the household who doesn't approve of Mashiro's goals to be a manga artist and constantly encourages him to study instead (although, in fairness, there was the problem with Mashiro's uncle having probably died from overworking, having unsuccessfully tried the rest of his life to get another hit manga). When she notices him playing video games instead of studying, she angrily tells him he won't even get into Minami High if he continues at that rate.

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** Takagi's mother is this, for which he consistently scored top in his school, but the pressure of it all leading him to rebel by choosing a career in manga. This was confronted early in the series when he said he's go to the same cheap college as Mashiro so he could skip classes when needed and focus on writing manga. It's implied that she wanted him to study so that he can "avenge" his father, who was fired from his job after TakingTheHeat for his boss. However, when he [[CallingTheOldManOut called her out on this, this]], she was apparently became willing to allow him to live as he wanted. His mother apparently has no such standards for Akito's older brother, who is fooling around in college around the start of the series.
** Mashiro's mother also follows this in the early parts of the series; she's the only one in the household who doesn't approve of Mashiro's goals to be a manga artist and constantly encourages him to study instead (although, in fairness, there was the problem with Mashiro's uncle having probably died from overworking, having unsuccessfully tried the rest of his life to get another hit manga). When she notices him playing video games instead of studying, she angrily tells him he won't even get into Minami High if he continues at that rate. She eventually relents, though.



* In ''VideoGame/AbsoluteDespairGirls'', Nagisa Shingetsu's parents are a ''very'' dark example, having viewed child-raising to be like a game, essentially forcing him to "level grind" in studying without sleeping under threat of physical punishment. The worst part is that it isn't even for Nagisa's benefit, but they apparently viewed him as an experiment in how much cramming kids could do before breakig.

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* In ''VideoGame/AbsoluteDespairGirls'', Nagisa Shingetsu's parents are a ''very'' dark example, having viewed child-raising to be like a game, essentially forcing him to "level grind" in studying without sleeping under threat of physical punishment. The worst part is that it isn't even for Nagisa's benefit, but they apparently viewed him as an experiment in how much cramming kids could do before breakig.breaking.
13th Nov '16 8:59:29 PM Valiona
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* In ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'', Asuna's mother Kyoko is strict with her when it comes to her studies. After Asuna escapes the eponymous video game, Kyoko plans on pulling strings and getting Asuna out of the SAO Survivor School so that she can get a better education, regardless of whether Asuna wants it.



** In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'', Makoto Nijima's older sister and legal guardian Sae pressures her to focus on her studies, [[spoiler:as a result of Sae's own personal issues, which include bitterness and the need to prove herself]].



* In ''VideoGame/AbsoluteDespairGirls'', Nagisa Shingetsu's parents are a ''very'' dark example, having viewed child-raising to be like a game.

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* In ''VideoGame/AbsoluteDespairGirls'', Nagisa Shingetsu's parents are a ''very'' dark example, having viewed child-raising to be like a game.game, essentially forcing him to "level grind" in studying without sleeping under threat of physical punishment. The worst part is that it isn't even for Nagisa's benefit, but they apparently viewed him as an experiment in how much cramming kids could do before breakig.
2nd Nov '16 7:43:02 PM InSetsofThree
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* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'': Lois enrolls Malcolm in classes and extracurricular activities that he doesn't want to be a part of, forces him to tutor his brothers, tries to keep him from dating on the off-chance that it'll distract him from homework, and eavesdrops on his college interviews. Malcolm finds this behavior unreasonable and highly pressuring, and considers her an overbearing EducationMama; Lois, on the other hand, thinks that these are necessary efforts to make on behalf of a [[BrilliantButLazy lazy child]] with an IQ of 165.
12th Oct '16 6:29:34 PM Wuz
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This trope is especially pervasive in East Asian families, due to the existence of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_examination Imperial examination]], a standardized test you could take in China that was absolutely necessary for a position as an ObstructiveBureaucrat, one of the cushiest and most well-paying jobs then available. (The topic of the test was the writings of and about the great philosopher Creator/{{Confucius}}, meaning that anyone who could read had a shot at a government job.) Many of the other nations in China's cultural shadow adopted this system, giving rise to the stereotype that all Asian parents are like this. Such parents have been given the name "Tiger Moms", and specifically ''kyoiku mama'' (教育ママ) in Japanese. However, this parental figure is universally reviled by the current generation, leading to this becoming a DiscreditedTrope.

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This trope is especially pervasive in East Asian families, due to the existence of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_examination Imperial examination]], a standardized test you could take in China that was absolutely necessary for a position as an ObstructiveBureaucrat, one of the cushiest and most well-paying jobs then available. (The topic of the test was the writings of and about the great philosopher Creator/{{Confucius}}, meaning that anyone who could read had a shot at a government job.) Many of the other nations in China's cultural shadow adopted this system, giving rise to the stereotype that all Asian parents are like this. Such parents have been given the name "Tiger Moms", Moms" (Traditional: 虎媽, Simplified: 虎妈, Pinyin: hǔmā) in Chinese, and specifically ''kyoiku mama'' (教育ママ) in Japanese. However, this parental figure is universally reviled by the current generation, leading to this becoming a DiscreditedTrope.
24th Sep '16 11:36:29 PM IronicMouse
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* Toshi and Akiko's mother on ''American Dad'' is this in spades. She works both her children like slaves, though she seems to give Toshi slightly more freedom as he is often seen hanging out with Steve and his other friends. Akiko on the other hand is given treatment that makes the Tiger Mom look slack. When Akiko loses a spelling bee to Steve, her mother swears to DOUBLE her workload.

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* Toshi and Akiko's mother on ''American Dad'' ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' is this in spades. She works both her children like slaves, though she seems to give Toshi slightly more freedom as he is often seen hanging out with Steve and his other friends. Akiko on the other hand is given treatment that makes the Tiger Mom look slack. When Akiko loses a spelling bee to Steve, her mother swears to DOUBLE her workload.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EducationMama