History Main / EaglelandOsmosis

11th Jun '16 1:04:38 PM Fallingwater
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Added DiffLines:

** Speaking of weddings: the ritual in countries other than the US or the UK never had the "let them speak now or forever hold their peace" part. Notably many American and English weddings no longer have it either, for all the good practical reasons you can imagine and various legal ones you might not, but it still sometimes pops up in popular culture, to the point people in countries in which that line never existed occasionally expect it.
16th May '16 8:00:12 AM DesertDragon
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Please note that while this trope is common in RealLife, examples here should only be from the media.



** Many French judges also get annoyed at hearing themselves being called "Votre Honneur" ("Your Honor", the American form of address) instead of the correct French address, "Monsieur/Madame le juge" / "Monsieur/Madame le président/e".

to:

** Many French judges also get annoyed at hearing themselves being called "Votre Honneur" ("Your Honor", the American form of address) instead of the correct French address, "Monsieur/Madame le juge" / or "Monsieur/Madame le président/e".
16th May '16 7:58:29 AM DesertDragon
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** Many French judges also get annoyed at hearing themselves being called "Votre Honneur" ("Your Honor", the American form of address) instead of the correct French address, "Monsieur le juge" / "Monsieur le président".[[note]]The feminine forms -- "Madame la juge" and "Madame la présidente" respectively -- should be used where appropriate.[[/note]]
** The problems with forms of address also appear in Germany. "Euer Ehren" (Your Honour) is incorrect - it's "Herr Vorsitzender" or "Frau Vorsitzende" (Mr. or Mrs. Chairman). Sometimes "Hohes Gericht" (High Court), under certain circumstances. But never "Euer Ehren".

to:

** Many French judges also get annoyed at hearing themselves being called "Votre Honneur" ("Your Honor", the American form of address) instead of the correct French address, "Monsieur "Monsieur/Madame le juge" / "Monsieur "Monsieur/Madame le président".[[note]]The feminine forms -- "Madame la juge" and "Madame la présidente" respectively -- should be used where appropriate.[[/note]]
président/e".
** The problems with forms of address also appear in Germany. "Euer Ehren" (Your Honour) is incorrect - it's "Herr Vorsitzender" or "Frau Vorsitzende" (Mr. (Mister or Mrs. Madam Chairman). Sometimes "Hohes Gericht" (High Court), under certain circumstances. But never "Euer Ehren".
14th May '16 11:08:43 AM DeisTheAlcano
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''Judge:''' You've been watching too much American TV, Mr. Ciccone. No one "approaches the bench" in a Canadian court.

to:

''Judge:''' '''Judge:''' You've been watching too much American TV, Mr. Ciccone. No one "approaches the bench" in a Canadian court.
14th May '16 11:08:27 AM DeisTheAlcano
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-> '''Louis Ciccone:''' Your honour, may I approach the bench?
-> '''Judge:''' You've been watching too much American TV, Mr. Ciccone. No one "approaches the bench" in a Canadian court.
-->--''Series/SeeingThings''

to:

-> '''Louis ->'''Louis Ciccone:''' Your honour, may I approach the bench?
-> '''Judge:'''
bench?\\
''Judge:'''
You've been watching too much American TV, Mr. Ciccone. No one "approaches the bench" in a Canadian court.
-->--''Series/SeeingThings''
-->-- ''Series/SeeingThings''



* From the [[GermanMedia German]] SketchComedy ''Series/{{Switch}}'': A judge tries to overrule a lawyer's objection, but the lawyer protests that it's not possible to overrule an objection in German court. Later the defendant protests that he doesn't want the jury to be swayed by the prosecutor's language, but the judge points out that there is no jury. In German court there is only a "jury" of three professional aldermen.

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* From the [[GermanMedia German]] SketchComedy ''Series/{{Switch}}'': ''Series/Switch1975'': A judge tries to overrule a lawyer's objection, but the lawyer protests that it's not possible to overrule an objection in German court. Later the defendant protests that he doesn't want the jury to be swayed by the prosecutor's language, but the judge points out that there is no jury. In German court there is only a "jury" of three professional aldermen.
22nd Apr '16 5:36:37 AM 20person
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22nd Apr '16 5:36:27 AM 20person
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** Although "My Lord" does only apply to supreme/superior court (where appeals processes, jury trials, and the most severe crimes are tried). A provincial court (where at least 95% of crimes are tried) still retains "Your Honour". But most ''Canadians'' don't even know this distinction... thanks again to this trope and readily available access to American media.

to:

** Although "My Lord" does only apply to supreme/superior court the Supreme Court and superior/appeal courts (where appeals processes, jury trials, and the most severe crimes are tried). A provincial court (where at least 95% of crimes are tried) still retains "Your Honour". But most ''Canadians'' don't even know this distinction... thanks again to this trope and readily available access to American media.media.
***
18th Apr '16 1:44:02 AM JackG
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* In the 1981 Australian TV movie ''Airhawk'', Hawk's brother is involved in a scene with some criminals, who beat him up. Because he doesn't want the police involved, he tells them he doesn't want to press charges against the men who assaulted him, only to be told that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he's been watching too much American television]]. In Australia it's the State that presses charges, not the victim.

to:

* In the 1981 Australian TV movie ''Airhawk'', Hawk's brother is involved in a scene scheme with some criminals, who beat him up. up. Because he doesn't want the police involved, he tells them the detective he doesn't want to press charges against the men who assaulted him, only to be told him. The detective replies curtly that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he's been watching too much American television]]. In television]]; in Australia it's the State that presses charges, not the victim.
18th Apr '16 1:41:47 AM JackG
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Added DiffLines:

* In the 1981 Australian TV movie ''Airhawk'', Hawk's brother is involved in a scene with some criminals, who beat him up. Because he doesn't want the police involved, he tells them he doesn't want to press charges against the men who assaulted him, only to be told that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he's been watching too much American television]]. In Australia it's the State that presses charges, not the victim.
17th Apr '16 7:38:29 PM Fireblood
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* Parodied in the Icelandic sketch show ''Mið Ísland'' where a defense lawyer in an Icelandic courtroom addresses the judge as "yðar hátign" (or "your highness" in English bungling even the American term) and ask permission to address the jury, only to be informed there are are no juries in Iceland. He then ask whether he may approach the bench (with the judge asking "what bench?") and explains that his whole case hinges on a moving speech before a jury that includes minorities. After the judge assures him there is no jury the defense lawyer advises the defendant to admit guilt before even the charges are read.
* ''Every British legal show ever'' shows the judge banging a gavel to quieten down the court. They don't. This overlaps with TheCoconutEffect.
* Israeli skit show ''Ktzarim'' featured a lawyer giving a powerful speech in defence of her client, until the judge asks her what she’s doing, and explains that the people she’s addressing are not the jury because Israel doesn’t use juries.[[note]]This is a holdover from the Ottoman era that was not changed during the British Mandate because of the impracticality of having juries in a country with so few people.[[/note]] She asks in shock who the people she was addressing actually are, and he tells her they’re just spectators and friends and relatives of the people involved. She quickly proceeds to [[AmoralAttorney gather all the gifts she gave them]], and tells one man, ‘[[CastingCouch Don’t you say a single word about last night]].’

to:

* Parodied in the Icelandic sketch show ''Mið Ísland'' where a defense lawyer in an Icelandic courtroom addresses the judge as "yðar hátign" (or "your highness" in English English, bungling even the American term) and ask asks permission to address the jury, only to be informed there are are no juries in Iceland. He then ask whether he may approach the bench (with the judge asking "what bench?") and explains that his whole case hinges on a moving speech before a jury that includes minorities. After the judge assures him there is no jury the defense lawyer advises the defendant to admit guilt before even the charges are even read.
* ''Every British legal show ever'' shows the judge banging a gavel to quieten quiet down the court. They don't.don't (there's no gavel). This overlaps with TheCoconutEffect.
* The Israeli skit show ''Ktzarim'' featured a lawyer giving a powerful speech in defence defense of her client, until the judge asks her what she’s doing, and explains that the people she’s addressing are not the jury because Israel doesn’t use juries.[[note]]This is a holdover from the Ottoman era that was not changed during the British Mandate because of the impracticality of having juries in a country with so few people.[[/note]] She asks in shock who the people she was addressing actually are, and he tells her they’re just spectators and friends and relatives of the people involved. She quickly proceeds to [[AmoralAttorney gather all the gifts she gave them]], and tells one man, ‘[[CastingCouch Don’t you say a single word about last night]].’
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