History Main / EaglelandOsmosis

22nd Apr '16 5:36:37 AM 20person
Is there an issue? Send a Message
22nd Apr '16 5:36:27 AM 20person
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Although "My Lord" does only apply to supreme/superior court (where appeals processes, jury trials, and the most severe crimes are tried). A provincial court (where at least 95% of crimes are tried) still retains "Your Honour". But most ''Canadians'' don't even know this distinction... thanks again to this trope and readily available access to American media.

to:

** Although "My Lord" does only apply to supreme/superior court the Supreme Court and superior/appeal courts (where appeals processes, jury trials, and the most severe crimes are tried). A provincial court (where at least 95% of crimes are tried) still retains "Your Honour". But most ''Canadians'' don't even know this distinction... thanks again to this trope and readily available access to American media.media.
***
18th Apr '16 1:44:02 AM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the 1981 Australian TV movie ''Airhawk'', Hawk's brother is involved in a scene with some criminals, who beat him up. Because he doesn't want the police involved, he tells them he doesn't want to press charges against the men who assaulted him, only to be told that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he's been watching too much American television]]. In Australia it's the State that presses charges, not the victim.

to:

* In the 1981 Australian TV movie ''Airhawk'', Hawk's brother is involved in a scene scheme with some criminals, who beat him up. up. Because he doesn't want the police involved, he tells them the detective he doesn't want to press charges against the men who assaulted him, only to be told him. The detective replies curtly that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he's been watching too much American television]]. In television]]; in Australia it's the State that presses charges, not the victim.
18th Apr '16 1:41:47 AM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In the 1981 Australian TV movie ''Airhawk'', Hawk's brother is involved in a scene with some criminals, who beat him up. Because he doesn't want the police involved, he tells them he doesn't want to press charges against the men who assaulted him, only to be told that [[YouWatchTooMuchX he's been watching too much American television]]. In Australia it's the State that presses charges, not the victim.
17th Apr '16 7:38:29 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Parodied in the Icelandic sketch show ''Mið Ísland'' where a defense lawyer in an Icelandic courtroom addresses the judge as "yðar hátign" (or "your highness" in English bungling even the American term) and ask permission to address the jury, only to be informed there are are no juries in Iceland. He then ask whether he may approach the bench (with the judge asking "what bench?") and explains that his whole case hinges on a moving speech before a jury that includes minorities. After the judge assures him there is no jury the defense lawyer advises the defendant to admit guilt before even the charges are read.
* ''Every British legal show ever'' shows the judge banging a gavel to quieten down the court. They don't. This overlaps with TheCoconutEffect.
* Israeli skit show ''Ktzarim'' featured a lawyer giving a powerful speech in defence of her client, until the judge asks her what she’s doing, and explains that the people she’s addressing are not the jury because Israel doesn’t use juries.[[note]]This is a holdover from the Ottoman era that was not changed during the British Mandate because of the impracticality of having juries in a country with so few people.[[/note]] She asks in shock who the people she was addressing actually are, and he tells her they’re just spectators and friends and relatives of the people involved. She quickly proceeds to [[AmoralAttorney gather all the gifts she gave them]], and tells one man, ‘[[CastingCouch Don’t you say a single word about last night]].’

to:

* Parodied in the Icelandic sketch show ''Mið Ísland'' where a defense lawyer in an Icelandic courtroom addresses the judge as "yðar hátign" (or "your highness" in English English, bungling even the American term) and ask asks permission to address the jury, only to be informed there are are no juries in Iceland. He then ask whether he may approach the bench (with the judge asking "what bench?") and explains that his whole case hinges on a moving speech before a jury that includes minorities. After the judge assures him there is no jury the defense lawyer advises the defendant to admit guilt before even the charges are even read.
* ''Every British legal show ever'' shows the judge banging a gavel to quieten quiet down the court. They don't.don't (there's no gavel). This overlaps with TheCoconutEffect.
* The Israeli skit show ''Ktzarim'' featured a lawyer giving a powerful speech in defence defense of her client, until the judge asks her what she’s doing, and explains that the people she’s addressing are not the jury because Israel doesn’t use juries.[[note]]This is a holdover from the Ottoman era that was not changed during the British Mandate because of the impracticality of having juries in a country with so few people.[[/note]] She asks in shock who the people she was addressing actually are, and he tells her they’re just spectators and friends and relatives of the people involved. She quickly proceeds to [[AmoralAttorney gather all the gifts she gave them]], and tells one man, ‘[[CastingCouch Don’t you say a single word about last night]].’
28th Jan '16 12:58:36 PM Gideoncrawle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-> '''Judge:''' [[YouWatchTooMuchX You've been watching too much American TV,]] Mr. Ciccone. No one "approaches the bench" in a Canadian court.

to:

-> '''Judge:''' [[YouWatchTooMuchX You've been watching too much American TV,]] TV, Mr. Ciccone. No one "approaches the bench" in a Canadian court.
11th Jan '16 6:00:17 AM DazVoz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--> '''Rhys:''' We don't have coastguards, love. That's American.

to:

--> '''Rhys:''' We don't have coastguards, love. That's American. [[note]]The real-world Australia does have coastguards.[[/note]]
12th Dec '15 9:31:36 AM h27kim
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* General Tso's Chicken, a popular "Hunanese" dish at American Chinese restaurants, was created by a Taiwanese chef (admittedly, of Hunanese extraction) at a New York restaurant (at least, that's one version of the story, but no one disputes that it was invented in United States and not in China). As such, it has been a virtual unknown in mainland China, especially in Hunan, where its namesake, General Tso Tsung-Tang, came from. When the Hunanese chefs first tasted it after US-PRC relations were restored, they thought it was all wrong and incompatible with Hunanese cuisine. However, after a few decades of official contact with Americans, [[http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7639868 the Hunanese are starting to adopt the dish as their own "traditional dish."]]

to:

* General Tso's Chicken, a popular "Hunanese" dish at American Chinese restaurants, was created by a Taiwanese chef (admittedly, of Hunanese extraction) at a New York restaurant (at least, that's one version of the story, but no one disputes that it was invented in United States and not in China). As such, it has been a virtual unknown in mainland China, especially in Hunan, where its namesake, General Tso Tsung-Tang, came from. When the Hunanese chefs first tasted it after US-PRC relations were restored, normalized, they thought it was all wrong and incompatible with Hunanese cuisine. However, after a few decades of official contact with Americans, [[http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7639868 the Hunanese are starting to adopt the dish as their own "traditional dish."]]
12th Dec '15 9:31:03 AM h27kim
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* General Tso's Chicken, a popular "Hunanese" dish at American Chinese restaurants, was created by a Taiwanese chef (admittedly, of Hunanese extraction) at a New York restaurant (at least, that's one version of the story, but no one disputes that it was invented in United States and not in China). As such, it has been a virtual unknown in mainland China, especially in Hunan, where its namesake, General Tso Tsung-Tang, came from. However, after a few decades of official contact with Americans, [[http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7639868 the Hunanese are starting to adopt the dish as their own.]]

to:

* General Tso's Chicken, a popular "Hunanese" dish at American Chinese restaurants, was created by a Taiwanese chef (admittedly, of Hunanese extraction) at a New York restaurant (at least, that's one version of the story, but no one disputes that it was invented in United States and not in China). As such, it has been a virtual unknown in mainland China, especially in Hunan, where its namesake, General Tso Tsung-Tang, came from. When the Hunanese chefs first tasted it after US-PRC relations were restored, they thought it was all wrong and incompatible with Hunanese cuisine. However, after a few decades of official contact with Americans, [[http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7639868 the Hunanese are starting to adopt the dish as their own.]]own "traditional dish."]]
17th Nov '15 6:22:11 PM Kotatroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Reader's Digest once ran an article on how American cop shows caused some French people to demand to see a warrant before having their home searched, which wasn't required in France. This was in the 1980s.[[note]]Unless they start an investigation in flagrante delicto ("enquête de flagrance"), the police will need a document ("commission rogatoire") delegating the investigation powers of an investigating judge ("juge d'instruction") to the police. It's not like they can just barge in on a whim.[[/note]] They would also quote "rights" from the American constitution, even though they have their own "Bill of Rights" called "Déclaration des Droits de l'Homme" ("Declaration of the Rights of Man").[[note]]Interestingly the original "Droites de l'Homme/Rights of Man" was written back during the (French) Revolution by ThomasPaine, and inspired the American constitution.[[/note]]

to:

* Reader's Digest once ran an article on how American cop shows caused some French people to demand to see a warrant before having their home searched, which wasn't required in France. This was in the 1980s.[[note]]Unless they start an investigation in flagrante delicto ("enquête de flagrance"), the police will need a document ("commission rogatoire") delegating the investigation powers of an investigating judge ("juge d'instruction") to the police. It's not like they can just barge in on a whim.[[/note]] They would also quote "rights" from the American constitution, even though they have their own "Bill of Rights" called "Déclaration des Droits de l'Homme" ("Declaration of the Rights of Man").[[note]]Interestingly the original "Droites de l'Homme/Rights of Man" was written back during the (French) Revolution by ThomasPaine, and inspired the American constitution.Revolution.[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 225. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EaglelandOsmosis