History Main / DramaticDownstageTurn

18th Oct '15 9:32:26 PM Green_lantern40
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* Quite common in the original ''Franchise/PerryMason'' television series. Especially frequent during the courtroom scenes to add movement and interest during witness testimony.

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* Quite common in the original ''Franchise/PerryMason'' television series.series, and its later MadeForTVMovie follow-ups. Especially frequent during the courtroom scenes to add movement and interest during witness testimony.
21st Dec '14 6:34:03 PM Headrock
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** One occurs in "Unification I" from season 5. Amanda (Spock's mother) performs it during her scene with Picard. She goes for more of a "preoccupied" kind of downstage turn, but it's understandable since she is distraught over her son's apparent [[spoiler:defection]].

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** One occurs in "Unification I" from season 5. Amanda Perrin (Spock's mother) step-mother) performs it during her scene with Picard. She goes for more of a "preoccupied" kind of downstage turn, but it's understandable since she is distraught over her son's Spock's apparent [[spoiler:defection]].[[spoiler:defection]].
*** Perrin actually does the exact same thing during her first episode ("Sarek"), when Picard comes to her quarters to confront her about her husband's illness.
2nd Sep '14 6:22:39 AM Headrock
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* Occurs often during conversations in the ''VideoGame/MassEffect'' series, though the turns rarely persist longer than one or two sentences.
25th Apr '14 5:29:16 PM Headrock
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A Dramatic Downstage Turn is a theatrical method used for forcing the focus onto one of the characters, creating a dramatic effect. In theater, the character usually moves slightly downstage (i.e., toward the audience), and may even move into a spot that has more stage lights illuminating it, emphasizing her over other characters in the scene. This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. In TV or film, where the camera replaces the audience, the character may turn directly to the camera, away from the other characters, or walk closer to the camera while other characters remain slightly behind in the background (and possibly out-of-focus).

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A In a scene containing two or more characters who are interacting (or conversing) with each other, a Dramatic Downstage Turn is a theatrical visual method used for forcing the focus onto one of the characters, creating a dramatic effect. them without interrupting that interaction. In theater, a classic Downstage Turn typically involves the character usually moves walking slightly downstage (i.e., toward the audience), and may even move perhaps into a specially-illuminated spot that has more stage lights illuminating it, on the stage, thereby emphasizing her over other characters that character above all others in the scene. This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. In TV or film, where the a camera replaces the audience, the character may turn directly to into the camera, away from the other characters, or walk closer to towards the camera while other characters remain slightly behind in the background (and possibly out-of-focus).
out-of-focus).

This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", a staple theatrical technique where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. The Turn simply goes beyond that by having the actor change facing entirely, and may involve any number of additional visual aids for extra effect. However, as with "Cheating Out", a downstage turn is specifically designed ''not to interrupt the ongoing interaction'' with the other characters -- It's simply that one character is now drawing a lot of focus by no longer facing the others.



Please note: This is not an InternalMonologue! The characters are still having a conversation here; it's only that one character is drawing focus by no longer facing the others.


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Contrast with InternalMonologue, where similar visual effects are sometimes used, but in which case the character is not interacting with others in the scene (the Dramatic Downstage Turn only applies as long as interaction continues).
25th Apr '14 11:36:22 AM Madrugada
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A Dramatic Downstage Turn is a theatrical method used for forcing the focus onto one of the characters, creating an artificial dramatic effect. In theater, the character usually moves slightly downstage (i.e., toward the audience), and may even move into a spot that has more stage lights illuminating it, emphasizing her over other characters in the scene. This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. In TV or film, where the camera replaces the audience, the character may turn directly to the camera, away from the other characters, or walk closer to the camera while other characters remain slightly behind in the background (and possibly out-of-focus).

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A Dramatic Downstage Turn is a theatrical method used for forcing the focus onto one of the characters, creating an artificial a dramatic effect. In theater, the character usually moves slightly downstage (i.e., toward the audience), and may even move into a spot that has more stage lights illuminating it, emphasizing her over other characters in the scene. This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. In TV or film, where the camera replaces the audience, the character may turn directly to the camera, away from the other characters, or walk closer to the camera while other characters remain slightly behind in the background (and possibly out-of-focus).



Please note: This is not an InternalMonologue! The characters are still having a conversation here; it's only that one character (for no good reason other than the RuleOfDrama) is drawing focus by no longer facing the others. It's an unnatural positioning, which is usually very noticeable. Most viewers will simply [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality accept it]], if the scene is gripping enough.

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Please note: This is not an InternalMonologue! The characters are still having a conversation here; it's only that one character (for no good reason other than the RuleOfDrama) is drawing focus by no longer facing the others. It's an unnatural positioning, which is usually very noticeable. Most viewers will simply [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality accept it]], if the scene is gripping enough.
others.
25th Apr '14 11:35:07 AM Madrugada
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''Alice and Bob are having a discussion or argument. In a moment of pure angst, Alice turns away from Bob towards the camera, walks a short distance forward, and continues the conversation now facing ''away'' from Bob (and toward the audience), breaking any sort of eye contact with him. Surprisingly, the conversation continues as though nothing happened.''

A Dramatic Downstage Turn is a theatrical method used for forcing the focus onto one of the characters, creating an artificial dramatic effect. In theater, the character usually moves slightly downstage (i.e., toward the audience), and may even move into a spot that has more stage lights illuminating it, emphasizing her over other characters in the scene. This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. In TV or film, where the camera replaces the audience, the character may walk closer to the camera while other characters remain slightly behind in the background (and possibly out-of-focus).

to:

''Alice and Bob are having a discussion or argument. In a moment of pure angst, Alice turns away from Bob towards the camera, walks a short distance forward, and continues the conversation now facing ''away'' from Bob (and toward the audience), breaking any sort of eye contact with him. Surprisingly, the conversation continues as though nothing happened.''

A Dramatic Downstage Turn is a theatrical method used for forcing the focus onto one of the characters, creating an artificial dramatic effect. In theater, the character usually moves slightly downstage (i.e., toward the audience), and may even move into a spot that has more stage lights illuminating it, emphasizing her over other characters in the scene. This maneuver is an extreme version of "Cheating Out", where actors orient their bodies unnaturally so as to be more visible to the audience. In TV or film, where the camera replaces the audience, the character may turn directly to the camera, away from the other characters, or walk closer to the camera while other characters remain slightly behind in the background (and possibly out-of-focus).



For 500 extra cliché points, television gives us the possibility of a Downstage Turn Volley: Alice does a Downstage Turn, now facing the camera, with Bob in the background. Bob then moves in front of Alice and turns to face her, forcing eye-contact. The camera then jumps to a different position, and Alice makes ''another'' Downstage Turn in this new direction. Repeat for more {{Narm}} as required. A variation on the above is when a furious Alice Turns while [[IFeelAngry explaining that she's furious]] with Bob, then whips back around when he asks why, to give the dramatic {{Reveal}} that she knows about his affair... and an ashamed Bob Turns the other way to mutter his excuses.

Since [[SeenItAMillionTimes this trope appears constantly]] in almost every SoapOpera in existence, as well as SoapWithinAShow shows, examples from such shows are not required here. Please list only parodies or examples from other genres.

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For 500 extra cliché points, television gives us the possibility of a Downstage Turn Volley: Alice does a Downstage Turn, now facing the camera, with Bob in the background. Bob then moves in front of Alice and turns to face her, forcing eye-contact. The camera then jumps to a different position, and Alice makes ''another'' Downstage Turn in this new direction. Repeat for more {{Narm}} as required.often as desired. A variation on the above is when a furious Alice Turns while [[IFeelAngry explaining that she's furious]] with Bob, then whips back around when he asks why, to give the dramatic {{Reveal}} that she knows about his affair... and an ashamed Bob Turns the other way to mutter his excuses.

Since [[SeenItAMillionTimes this trope appears constantly]] constantly in almost every SoapOpera in existence, as well as SoapWithinAShow shows, examples from such shows are not required here. Please list only parodies or examples from other genres.
4th Apr '14 5:35:54 PM Headrock
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** Also ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', usually when Sisko is having a long, involved chat with someone.

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' has several.
** One occurs in "Unification I" from season 5. Amanda (Spock's mother) performs it during her scene with Picard. She goes for more of a "preoccupied" kind of downstage turn, but it's understandable since she is distraught over her son's apparent [[spoiler:defection]].
*
Also ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', usually when Sisko is having a long, involved chat with someone.
17th Feb '14 5:57:50 PM Headrock
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[[AC:Film]]

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[[AC:Film]][[AC:{{Film}}]]
17th Feb '14 5:56:58 PM Headrock
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Added DiffLines:

[[AC:Film]]
* In ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'', Kirk makes the turn while lying in a prison bed, leaving [=McCoy=] in the background. They are both implied to be whispering, since they are in a room full of sleeping inmates... and yet [=McCoy=] has no trouble hearing Kirk while he's facing away from him.
15th Dec '13 4:49:52 PM JIKTV
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* Quite common in the original ''Series/PerryMason'' television series. Especially frequent during the courtroom scenes to add movement and interest during witness testimony.

to:

* Quite common in the original ''Series/PerryMason'' ''Franchise/PerryMason'' television series. Especially frequent during the courtroom scenes to add movement and interest during witness testimony.
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