History Main / DirectLineToTheAuthor

8th Feb '16 4:37:20 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Film/BuckarooBanzai'' is allegedly a real person, whose adventures were related to author Earl Mac Rauch and then adapted into a movie. The DVD commentary runs with this premise, further claiming that some details have been withheld or altered for security reasons. It also imagines that merchandise related to the movie is in fact inspired by the hero himself, in an example of RecursiveCanon.
to:
* ''Film/BuckarooBanzai'' Although ''Film/TheAdventuresOfBuckarooBanzaiAcrossThe8thDimension'' itself doesn't make a point of it, supporting materials claim that Buckaroo Banzai is allegedly a real person, whose adventures were related to author Earl Mac Rauch and then adapted into a the movie. The DVD commentary runs with this premise, further claiming that some details have been withheld or altered for security reasons. It also imagines that merchandise related to the movie is in fact inspired by the hero himself, in an example of RecursiveCanon.
8th Feb '16 3:34:08 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''BuckarooBanzai'' is allegedly a real person, whose adventures were related to author Earl Mac Rauch and then adapted into a movie. The DVD commentary runs with this premise, further claiming that some details have been withheld or altered for security reasons. It also imagines that merchandise related to the movie is in fact inspired by the hero himself, in an example of RecursiveCanon.
to:
* ''BuckarooBanzai'' ''Film/BuckarooBanzai'' is allegedly a real person, whose adventures were related to author Earl Mac Rauch and then adapted into a movie. The DVD commentary runs with this premise, further claiming that some details have been withheld or altered for security reasons. It also imagines that merchandise related to the movie is in fact inspired by the hero himself, in an example of RecursiveCanon.
24th Jan '16 1:39:05 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message
example indentation
* ''Literature/ThePrincessBride'' is introduced as a story edited down from a "famous" piece of literature written by S. Morgenstern, a fictional resident of the fictional country of Florin. The real author, Creator/WilliamGoldman, claims that this is the Good Parts Version his father (an immigrant from Florin) read to him as a child. There are frequent "editor's notes" which summarize the excised text (these summaries can run for pages being nothing but lists of how many pages were spent on the various mundanities of, say, Buttercup packing so she could move (three whole pages on her blouses, was the guy nuts?), or the things Buttercup was taught so she could be a royal, in order to impress upon us how very grateful we are to Mr. Goldman for editing the book). At one point Goldman claims he wrote an additional scene which the publisher refused to include and gives an address one may write to in order to obtain it. Letters sent to that address are responded to with an explanation that someone acting on the original author's behalf is still blocking publication of the additional scene. Later editions blurred the line further, with an afterword of Goldman recounting a meeting he had with Creator/StephenKing while he was writing the (real) screenplay for ''Misery''. He portrays King as a big fan of the original book who was outraged at some of the changes Goldman made. King is also alleged to be doing the abridgment of the long lost sequel ''Buttercup's Baby''. ** One of the later editions goes even further, revealing that the deal with Creator/StephenKing fell through, so he IS doing Buttercup's Baby...and he includes the first bits of it, resolving the cliffhanger ending of the original book.
to:
* ''Literature/ThePrincessBride'' is introduced as a story edited down from a "famous" piece of literature written by S. Morgenstern, a fictional resident of the fictional country of Florin. The real author, Creator/WilliamGoldman, claims that this is the Good Parts Version his father (an immigrant from Florin) read to him as a child. There are frequent "editor's notes" which summarize the excised text (these summaries can run for pages being nothing but lists of how many pages were spent on the various mundanities of, say, Buttercup packing so she could move (three whole pages on her blouses, was the guy nuts?), or the things Buttercup was taught so she could be a royal, in order to impress upon us how very grateful we are to Mr. Goldman for editing the book). At one point Goldman claims he wrote an additional scene which the publisher refused to include and gives an address one may write to in order to obtain it. Letters sent to that address are responded to with an explanation that someone acting on the original author's behalf is still blocking publication of the additional scene. Later editions blurred the line further, with an afterword of Goldman recounting a meeting he had with Creator/StephenKing while he was writing the (real) screenplay for ''Misery''. He portrays King as a big fan of the original book who was outraged at some of the changes Goldman made. King is also alleged to be doing the abridgment of the long lost sequel ''Buttercup's Baby''. ** Baby''. One of the later editions goes even further, revealing that the deal with Creator/StephenKing fell through, so he IS Goldman is doing Buttercup's Baby...''Buttercup's Baby''... and he includes the first bits of it, resolving the cliffhanger ending of the original book. book.
23rd Jan '16 9:22:13 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** One of the later editions goes even further, revealing that the deal with StephenKing fell through, so he IS doing Buttercup's Baby...and he includes the first bits of it, resolving the cliffhanger ending of the original book.
to:
** One of the later editions goes even further, revealing that the deal with StephenKing Creator/StephenKing fell through, so he IS doing Buttercup's Baby...and he includes the first bits of it, resolving the cliffhanger ending of the original book.
8th Jan '16 4:55:32 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In SpiderRobinson's ''Literature/CallahansCrosstimeSaloon'' series, Spider claims to be transcribing stories told to him by the narrator, Jake Stonebender. He even goes as far as writing Author's Notes and Prefaces "in character" as a Callahan's regular.
to:
* In SpiderRobinson's Creator/SpiderRobinson's ''Literature/CallahansCrosstimeSaloon'' series, Spider claims to be transcribing stories told to him by the narrator, Jake Stonebender. He even goes as far as writing Author's Notes and Prefaces "in character" as a Callahan's regular.
4th Jan '16 1:19:30 PM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Steven Brust's ''Literature/{{Dragaera}}'' novels occasionally place Brust as the translator of the stories from Dragaeran into English. He even has an interview with Paarfi, the "original author" of the Khaavren Romances, who is outraged by the changes that Brust admits he had to make. In one of the Vlad Taltos novels, Vlad mentions that he's been paid a sum of money by a "fool" to tell this particular story into a metal cylinder. Presumably, that fool is Brust. ** ''Tiassa'' sheds more light on the origin of Vlad's deal with the author. A man from "very far East" (Brust) met Vlad through Sethra Lavode, who met him through the Necromancer, and offered 500 Imperials of unminted gold for a few hours of conversation. One wonders where Steven Brust came by this large quantity of unminted gold. [[LogicBomb Maybe he made the money from selling books about Vlad?]] * ''Literature/DonQuixote'': Cervantes wrote that it was actually a translation of an account originally written in Arabic. ** This trope is parodied in ''Don Quixote'', because it was used by a lot of [[WeirdAlEffect (today forgotten)]] authors of chivalry books (an example is "The Knight Platir", a book burned in the famous scrutiny made in Don Quixote's library), who claimed that their story was based in an old manuscript found in an ancient pyramid or another ruined building in some faraway country, written in an exotic language by a wise, famed wizard who favoured the hero of the novel. Those claims are made to feign that the chivalry book was InspiredBy real events. Cervantes twists this and uses it to comic effect, explaining that the next part of the novel was found in some pamphlets and papers (only a few years old) found in Alcana de Toledo (a real city in Spain) in a silk mercer store, written in Arabic (a fair known language in Spain) by a (foolish) boy who didn't know what was written and so sold the papers to Cervantes for peanuts. If we include the funny name of the wizard and the fact that the [[UnreliableNarrator second author, the translator and Cide Hamete Benengeli are always making comments about the book]], we can see that Cervantes wants us to admit that all this tale is a long sequence of lies and nonsense... just like all the chivalry books.
to:
* Steven Brust's ''Literature/{{Dragaera}}'' novels occasionally place Brust as the translator of the stories from Dragaeran into English. He even has an interview with Paarfi, the "original author" of the Khaavren Romances, who is outraged by the changes that Brust admits he had to make. In one of the Vlad Taltos novels, Vlad mentions in one story that he's been paid a sum of money by a "fool" to tell this particular story narrating his stories into a metal cylinder. Presumably, that fool is Brust. ** cylinder in return for gold. ''Tiassa'' sheds more light on the origin of Vlad's deal with the author. A clarifies that a man from "very far East" (Brust) (presumably Brust) met Vlad through Sethra Lavode, who met him through the Necromancer, and offered 500 Imperials of unminted gold for a few hours of conversation. One wonders where Steven Brust came by this large quantity of unminted gold. [[LogicBomb Maybe he made the money from selling books about Vlad?]] conversation. * ''Literature/DonQuixote'': Cervantes wrote that it was actually a translation of an account originally written in Arabic. ** This trope is parodied in ''Don Quixote'', because it parodies the trope. It was used by a lot of [[WeirdAlEffect (today forgotten)]] authors of chivalry books (an example is "The Knight Platir", a book burned in the famous scrutiny made in Don Quixote's library), who claimed that their story was based in an old manuscript found in an ancient pyramid or another ruined building in some faraway country, written in an exotic language by a wise, famed wizard who favoured the hero of the novel. Those claims are made to feign that the chivalry book was InspiredBy real events. Cervantes twists this and uses it to comic effect, explaining that the next part of the novel was found in some pamphlets and papers (only a few years old) found in Alcana de Toledo (a real city in Spain) in a silk mercer store, written in Arabic (a fair known language in Spain) by a (foolish) boy who didn't know what was written and so sold the papers to Cervantes for peanuts. If we include the funny name of the wizard and the fact that the [[UnreliableNarrator second author, the translator and Cide Hamete Benengeli are always making comments about the book]], we can see that Cervantes wants us to admit that all this tale is a long sequence of lies and nonsense... just like all the chivalry books.
27th Nov '15 5:40:40 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* There is a... let's call it ''elaborate''... prologue to the ''TheScarletLetter'' in which Nathaniel Hawthorne explains that he did not write the story of Hester Prynne; he only found it.
to:
* There is a... let's call it ''elaborate''... prologue to the ''TheScarletLetter'' ''Literature/TheScarletLetter'' in which Nathaniel Hawthorne explains that he did not write the story of Hester Prynne; he only found it.
22nd Nov '15 4:08:30 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
In all these cases, however, it is considered canon that the author is repeating a story that is in fact true, if only to a certain degree. [[TheSagaOfDarrenShan One of the people the story is about may even be the author themselves]].
to:
In all these cases, however, it is considered canon that the author is repeating a story that is in fact true, if only to a certain degree. [[TheSagaOfDarrenShan [[Literature/TheSagaOfDarrenShan One of the people the story is about may even be the author themselves]].
29th Oct '15 11:17:26 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* After fifty-six years and thirty-six books, ''Asterix and the Missing Scroll'' reveals that ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'s adventures [[spoiler:were written down by Caesar in a lost chapter of his ''Literature/CommentariesOnTheGallicWars'', and passed down in Druidic oral traditions all the way down]] to Uderzo and Goscinny.
to:
* After fifty-six years and thirty-six books, ''Asterix and the Missing Scroll'' reveals that ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'s adventures [[spoiler:were written down by Caesar in a lost chapter of his ''Literature/CommentariesOnTheGallicWars'', ''Literature/CommentariesOnTheGallicWar'', and passed down in Druidic oral traditions all the way down]] to Uderzo and Goscinny.
29th Oct '15 11:16:44 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message
[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
to:
[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]

[[folder:Comics]] * It's long been tradition at MarvelComics that they weren't making stories up, just reporting what really happened. (To the point that they once showed a writer and artist very concerned they hadn't heard from their characters they "covered", and were debating what to do for the next issue. They reacted with absolute horror at the suggestion they just "make something up".) However, this was directly averted in a letter column after the Death of Phoenix in ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'', when the editor wrote about the many touching letters they received about how much the story meant to some of the fans. Some people even sent flowers. And then, they started getting ''death threats'' over the story. To which the editor said, "I know we joke we're just reporting what really happened, but it's just a comic book. It is brightly colored ink on cheap paper that will decay to dust in two hundred years. It is not worth threatening anyone's life."
to:
[[folder:Comics]] [[folder:Comic Books]] * It's long been tradition at MarvelComics that they weren't making stories up, just reporting what really happened. (To the point that they once showed a writer and artist very concerned they hadn't heard from their characters they "covered", and were debating what to do for the next issue. They reacted with absolute horror at the suggestion they just "make something up".) However, this was directly averted in a letter column after the Death of Phoenix in ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}'', ''ComicBook/XMen'', when the editor wrote about the many touching letters they received about how much the story meant to some of the fans. Some people even sent flowers. And then, they started getting ''death threats'' over the story. To which the editor said, "I know we joke we're just reporting what really happened, but it's just a comic book. It is brightly colored ink on cheap paper that will decay to dust in two hundred years. It is not worth threatening anyone's life."

* After fifty-six years and thirty-six books, ''Asterix and the Missing Scroll'' reveals that ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'s adventures [[spoiler:were written down by Caesar in a lost chapter of his ''Commentaries on the Gallic Wars'', and passed down in Druidic oral traditions all the way down]] to Uderzo and Goscinny.
to:
* After fifty-six years and thirty-six books, ''Asterix and the Missing Scroll'' reveals that ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'s adventures [[spoiler:were written down by Caesar in a lost chapter of his ''Commentaries on the Gallic Wars'', ''Literature/CommentariesOnTheGallicWars'', and passed down in Druidic oral traditions all the way down]] to Uderzo and Goscinny.
This list shows the last 10 events of 221. Show all.