History Main / DegradedBoss

20th May '17 2:28:20 PM Korodzik
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* ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheWoolBall'': After you defeat the spider-legged bosses at the end of episode 1, smaller spider-legged enemies begin appearing throughout episodes 2 and 3 [[spoiler:and the larger version of the boss makes a surprise re-appearance near the end of the game]].
28th Apr '17 9:50:13 AM MyFinalEdits
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** The first ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda'' game is rife with this. Dodongo, Manhandla, Gleeock, Digdogger, and Gohma all reappear in later dungeons as normal enemies. Dodongo even appears in threes later, Gleeock grows extra heads (from two in its first appearance up to four eventually, although the latter is for when it is reused as the boss of Level 8), and Digdogger splits into three after playing the Flute anywhere but its debut. That's just the first quest; they show up sooner and more often in the second one. In the case of Dodongo, in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'', Dodongos are run-of-the-mill nuisances. However, ''Ocarina of Time'' has [[KingMook King Dodongo]] as the boss version, operating much like the original Dodongo.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' also has pairs of Lizalfos presented as {{Mini Boss}}es in the second dungeon, while you play Link as a child. Adult Link can take them out in two hits with the Biggoron Sword, and by that point in the game young Link has enough equipment and [[HitPoints hearts]] to turn them into mooks. Stalfos are another example, as they also act as minibosses in their first encounter, but you also encounter them as regular enemies later. Then they are used as minibosses ''again'', with the added challenge of beating them both at once in a short time, lest they rise up again. Likewise, the first Iron Knuckle serves as the boss of the Child Link half of the Spirit Temple, while the subsequent encounters as Adult Link are significantly easier, especially with the Biggoron Sword.
** Nearly every miniboss in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The Wind Waker]]'' is encountered as a regular enemy some time after their original appearance. For example, the large Moblins with spears are presented as inmune guardians Link must avoid confronting, then one is fought as a MiniBoss in the fire dungeon. Afterwards, however, they're reduced largely to tough minions. This same role is later filled by the Darknuts, the first of which shows up as a sub-boss in the Tower of the Gods, but the very next section pits you up against about six of them and twelve Moblins (their later incarnations are more powerful, but you almost always fight at least two). Same case with the shielded Bokoblins, Mothulas and Stalfos.

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** The first ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda'' game is rife with this. Dodongo, Manhandla, Gleeock, Digdogger, and Gohma all reappear in later dungeons as normal enemies. Dodongo even appears in threes later, Gleeock grows extra heads (from two in its first appearance up to four eventually, although the latter is for when it is reused as the boss of Level 8), and Digdogger splits into three after playing the Flute anywhere but its debut. That's just the first quest; they show up sooner and more often in the second one. In the case of Dodongo, in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'', Dodongos are run-of-the-mill nuisances. However, In fact, ''Ocarina of Time'' has [[KingMook King Dodongo]] as the boss version to differentiate it from the regular version, operating much like the original Dodongo.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' also has pairs of Lizalfos presented as {{Mini Boss}}es in the second dungeon, while you play Link as a child. Adult Link finds them later as regular enemies and can take them out in two hits with the Biggoron Sword, and by that point in the game young Link has enough equipment and [[HitPoints hearts]] to turn them into mooks. Stalfos are another example, as they also act as minibosses in their first encounter, but you also encounter them as regular enemies later. Then they are used as minibosses ''again'', with the added challenge of beating them both at once in a short time, lest they rise up again. Likewise, the first Lastly, Iron Knuckle serves Knuckles appear as the boss of the Child Link half of minibosses in the Spirit Temple, but are only enemies in Ganon's Tower.
** Dinolfos and Wizzrobes in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' zigzag the trope. They're minibosses in their respective debuting temples (Woodfall Temple and Snowhead Temple, then regular enemies in later temples (Snowhead Temple and Stone Tower Temple), then bumped back to minibosses in the optional Secret Shrine. Wizzrobe is also fought as a miniboss in the Ancient Castle of Ikana,
while Dinolfos is in an optional room in the subsequent encounters as Adult Link are significantly easier, especially with the Biggoron Sword.
Moon.
** Nearly every dungeon miniboss in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The Wind Waker]]'' is encountered as a regular enemy some time after their original appearance. For example, the large Moblins with spears are presented as inmune guardians Link must avoid confronting, then one is fought as a MiniBoss in the fire dungeon. Afterwards, however, they're reduced largely to tough minions. This same role is later filled by the Darknuts, the first of which shows up as a sub-boss in the Tower of the Gods, but the very next section pits you up against about six of them and twelve Moblins (their later incarnations are more powerful, but you almost always fight at least two). Same case with the shielded Bokoblins, Mothulas and Stalfos. The remaining minibosses (Cyclos, Phantom Ganon and Big Octo) are the only aversions: The latter two always challenge Link in miniboss fashion, while Cyclos is fought only once to begin with.



* The Hell Vanguard from ''Franchise/DevilMayCry 3'' returns in later parts of the game as a lifebar-less mook. However, all recurrences are as strong as the first one. Furthermore, on one occasion (Mission 17's Trial of the Warrior room), the Hell Vanguard "mook" taps into the [[LimitBreak latent "Devil Trigger" power]] and becomes even more powerful than the boss version. On the highest difficulty, all "mook" versions of the Hell Vanguard can potentially use the Devil Trigger power.

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* ''Franchise/DevilMayCry'':
**
The Hell Vanguard from ''Franchise/DevilMayCry 3'' ''3'' returns in later parts of the game as a lifebar-less mook. However, all recurrences are as strong as the first one. Furthermore, on one occasion (Mission 17's Trial of the Warrior room), the Hell Vanguard "mook" taps into the [[LimitBreak latent "Devil Trigger" power]] and becomes even more powerful than the boss version. On the highest difficulty, all "mook" versions of the Hell Vanguard can potentially use the Devil Trigger power.



* A twist occurs in the first two ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'' games for the NES: the Malice Four from the first ''Ninja Gaiden'' appears in ''Ninja Gaiden II'' as mooks who are literal clones of the originals created by Ashtar. The clones are the same size as Ryu and are killed with a single strike like other regular mooks.
* Done both in-game and in-story in ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden II: The Dark Sword of Chaos''. The basic {{Mooks}} you first fight are in fact clones of the first boss of the original game. Clones of the games subsequent three bosses also appear, usually in GiantMook form, though Kelberos comes back in full Boss form.

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* ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'':
**
A twist occurs in the first two ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden'' games for the NES: the Malice Four from the first ''Ninja Gaiden'' appears in ''Ninja Gaiden II'' as mooks who are literal clones of the originals created by Ashtar. The clones are the same size as Ryu and are killed with a single strike like other regular mooks.
* ** Done both in-game and in-story in ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden II: The Dark Sword of Chaos''. The basic {{Mooks}} you first fight are in fact clones of the first boss of the original game. Clones of the games subsequent three bosses also appear, usually in GiantMook form, though Kelberos comes back in full Boss form.



* The first encounter with the centaurs in ''VideoGame/TombRaider'' is considered a boss fight, due to the fact that they're the first Atlanteans you see in the game and their appearance is a [[WhamEpisode shock.]] More centaurs are encountered later as regular enemies.
** The VideoGameRemake changes this by changing the first centaurs into a PuzzleBoss, and only the later ones act as regular enemies.

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* The first encounter with the centaurs in ''VideoGame/TombRaider'' is considered a boss fight, due to the fact that they're the first Atlanteans you see in the game and their appearance is a [[WhamEpisode shock.]] More centaurs are encountered later as regular enemies.
**
enemies. The VideoGameRemake changes this by changing the first centaurs into a PuzzleBoss, and only the later ones act as regular enemies.



* Done a lot in old beat'em-up arcade games. Examples: ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'', ''Cadillacs and Dinosaurs'', ''Ninja Combat'', and ''Arabian Nights''. Often, the first boss you face will also be the first GiantMook.
** As does the ''VideoGame/StreetsOfRage'' series with some of their boss characters. Lampshaded in Streets of Rage 2, with the weaker mook version of the boss "R. Bear" being called "[[OverlordJr Bear Jr.]]"
*** ''2'' takes it pretty quickly, too. After beating the twin robot bosses in Stage 7, the very first enemies you fight in Stage 8 are two more.
** In the arcade version of ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'', the {{elite mook}}s that appear near the end of Mission 3 and during the final battle in Mission 4 are all palette-swaps of Jeff, the Mission 2 boss (who was in turn, a head-swapped Lee brother). However, they're just as tough as the boss version of Jeff.
*** It also happens to Chin Taimei (Jeff's equivalent as the Mission 2 boss) in the NES version. In fact, it happens rather immediately, as the second fight in Mission 3 is against a group of three Chin clones.
*** In ''Super Double Dragon'', Steve and Jackson, the first two bosses, appear throughout the rest of the game as mooks. All of the previous bosses also appear in the final stage.
** In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheRound'', Scorn (the first boss) reappears many times as an EliteMook called "Tall Man." He's equally annoying, except he has less health.
** ''VideoGame/ThePunisherCapcom'' also reuses the first boss Scully as a mook in the final stage.
** In ''VideoGame/AlienVsPredatorCapcom'', the first boss, Chrysalis, reappears twice in the final stages and in a pair each time. The third boss, purple Arachnoid, reappears throughout the last two stages - on one occasion, ''six of them at once''. And you don't have endless ammo this time. And the fifth boss, Power Loader, appears twice during the last round as well.
** In ''VideoGame/UndercoverCops'', generic, already-damaged clones of the first boss show up in the last level.
** Done in ''VideoGame/ViolentStorm'', where clones of Dabel (but without the mask) appear as generic enemies near the end of the game.
** In ''VideoGame/TheKingOfDragons'': the Dragon Rider (Level 8 Boss) appears as a weaker PaletteSwap twice in Level 9 and once in Level 12.

to:

* Done a lot in old beat'em-up arcade games. Examples: ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'', ''Cadillacs and Dinosaurs'', ''Ninja Combat'', and ''Arabian Nights''. Often, the first boss you face will also be the first GiantMook.
** As does
with the ''VideoGame/StreetsOfRage'' series with some of their boss characters. Lampshaded in Streets of Rage 2, with the weaker mook version of the boss "R. Bear" being called "[[OverlordJr Bear Jr.]]"
***
]]" ''2'' takes it pretty quickly, too. After beating the twin robot bosses in Stage 7, the very first enemies you fight in Stage 8 are two more.
** * In the arcade version of ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'', the {{elite mook}}s that appear near the end of Mission 3 and during the final battle in Mission 4 are all palette-swaps of Jeff, the Mission 2 boss (who was in turn, a head-swapped Lee brother). However, they're just as tough as the boss version of Jeff.
***
Jeff. It also happens to Chin Taimei (Jeff's equivalent as the Mission 2 boss) in the NES version. In fact, it happens rather immediately, as the second fight in Mission 3 is against a group of three Chin clones.
*** In
clones. And in ''Super Double Dragon'', Steve and Jackson, the first two bosses, appear throughout the rest of the game as mooks. All of the previous bosses also appear in the final stage.
** * In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheRound'', Scorn (the first boss) reappears many times as an EliteMook called "Tall Man." He's equally annoying, except he has less health.
** * ''VideoGame/ThePunisherCapcom'' also reuses the first boss Scully as a mook in the final stage.
** * In ''VideoGame/AlienVsPredatorCapcom'', the first boss, Chrysalis, reappears twice in the final stages and in a pair each time. The third boss, purple Arachnoid, reappears throughout the last two stages - on one occasion, ''six of them at once''. And you don't have endless ammo this time. And the fifth boss, Power Loader, appears twice during the last round as well.
** * In ''VideoGame/UndercoverCops'', generic, already-damaged clones of the first boss show up in the last level.
** * Done in ''VideoGame/ViolentStorm'', where clones of Dabel (but without the mask) appear as generic enemies near the end of the game.
** * In ''VideoGame/TheKingOfDragons'': the Dragon Rider (Level 8 Boss) appears as a weaker PaletteSwap twice in Level 9 and once in Level 12.



* In the second ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' game, a [[KingMook Mother of]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast All Hunters]] is fought as a boss on "If I had a rocket launcher...", then the final stage has at least three of them. On the ''Infinity'' level "You think you're big time?" they get re-promoted to boss status, and have homing projectiles this time. In ''2'', the KingMook version of the Cyborgs only appears once, while in ''Infinity'' it is a recurring enemy, although still rare.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'':
**
In the second ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' game, a [[KingMook Mother of]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast All Hunters]] is fought as a boss on "If I had a rocket launcher...", then the final stage has at least three of them. On the ''Infinity'' level "You think you're big time?" they get re-promoted to boss status, and have homing projectiles this time. In ''2'', the KingMook version of the Cyborgs only appears once, while in ''Infinity'' it is a recurring enemy, although still rare.



* The climax of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2: Episode Two'' pits you against a small army of biomechanical tripods known as "Striders", several of which made your life a living hell in a certain battle in the original ''Half-Life 2'', and one of which was the ''actual'' boss of ''Half-Life 2: Episode One''. Oh, and this time they have Hunter support. This battle would be quite a bit harder if you didn't have [[spoiler:a car and a weapon that could OneHitKill them.]] Their machine guns receive a significant downgrade from the near-instakill they were in earlier installments.
** For that matter, the Hunters were introduced with one [[spoiler: nearly killing Alyx]], and two or three of them was a boss battle early in the Episode. Two or three of them escort ''every Strider''. Fortunately, you have [[CarFu a weapon]] that can OneHitKill ''them'', too.

to:

* The climax of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2: Episode Two'' Two'':
** The climax
pits you against a small army of biomechanical tripods known as "Striders", several of which made your life a living hell in a certain battle in the original ''Half-Life 2'', and one of which was the ''actual'' boss of ''Half-Life 2: Episode One''. Oh, and this time they have Hunter support. This battle would be quite a bit harder if you didn't have [[spoiler:a car and a weapon that could OneHitKill them.]] Their machine guns receive a significant downgrade from the near-instakill they were in earlier installments.
** For that matter, the The Hunters were introduced with one [[spoiler: nearly killing Alyx]], and two or three of them was a boss battle early in the Episode. Two or three of them escort ''every Strider''. Fortunately, you have [[CarFu a weapon]] that can OneHitKill ''them'', too.



* The Cyberdemon and Spider Mastermind boss monsters of the first ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' game return in the sequels as regular level monsters (though they're just as tough as they were as bosses), while the final bosses are upgraded to multiple-stories-high monster-spawning buildings. ''Doom 3'' then ''promoted'' the Cyberdemon back to boss status.
** And in the original ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', the bosses of the shareware version (the Barons of Hell) become more common in the retail installments. Again, they're just as tough as they were as bosses, though the energy weapons (the plasma gun and the {{BFG}}) that you acquire later on make quick work of them.
*** In ''Doom 3'', in an homage to the original ''Doom'', you fight a pair of Hell Knights as bosses right before you teleport into Hell. Starting with Hell you encounter them as regular enemies (but now they actually have less hit points than when they were bosses).
*** ''Doom 2'' also adds the Hell Knights, a PaletteSwap of the Baron with half the health. Combined with the above-mentioned double-barreled shotgun, they show up more than the Barons without unbalancing things too drastically. Likewise, the Arachnotrons are smaller versions of the Spider Mastermind with plasma cannons instead of a chaingun.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'':
**
The Cyberdemon and Spider Mastermind boss monsters of the first ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' game return in the sequels as regular level monsters (though they're just as tough as they were as bosses), while the final bosses are upgraded to multiple-stories-high monster-spawning buildings. ''Doom 3'' then ''promoted'' the Cyberdemon back to boss status.
** And in the original ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'', the The bosses of the shareware version (the Barons of Hell) become more common in the retail installments. Again, they're just as tough as they were as bosses, though the energy weapons (the plasma gun and the {{BFG}}) that you acquire later on make quick work of them.
*** ** In ''Doom 3'', in an homage to the original ''Doom'', you fight a pair of Hell Knights as bosses right before you teleport into Hell. Starting with Hell you encounter them as regular enemies (but now they actually have less hit points than when they were bosses).
*** ** ''Doom 2'' also adds the Hell Knights, a PaletteSwap of the Baron with half the health. Combined with the above-mentioned double-barreled shotgun, they show up more than the Barons without unbalancing things too drastically. Likewise, the Arachnotrons are smaller versions of the Spider Mastermind with plasma cannons instead of a chaingun.



* ''VideoGame/SeriousSam: The First Encounter'' has the Aludran Reptiloid, Highlander, which appears as a boss. When it reappears in subsequent installments of Serious Sam, it has been demoted to a mook which is ironic since in the Second Encounter, they can withstand more beating before dying.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SeriousSam: The ''VideoGame/SeriousSam'':
** ''The
First Encounter'' has the Aludran Reptiloid, Highlander, which appears as a boss. When it reappears in subsequent installments of Serious Sam, it has been demoted to a mook which is ironic since in the Second Encounter, they can withstand more beating before dying.



* Plated Beetles, adult Sheegoths and Chozo Ghosts in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'' all first appear as mini-bosses, but later become regular enemies. The Sheegoth particularly feels degraded, as it was a quite hard to beat on the first time, but after you get the Plasma Beam, you can ''kill it with one shot without even waiting for it to expose its weak spot!''

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* ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'':
**
Plated Beetles, adult Sheegoths and Chozo Ghosts in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'' all first appear as mini-bosses, but later become regular enemies. The Sheegoth particularly feels degraded, as it was a quite hard to beat on the first time, but after you get the Plasma Beam, you can ''kill it with one shot without even waiting for it to expose its weak spot!''



* Just about every boss in ''VideoGame/{{Painkiller}}'' was a unique one-shot, but the fan-made expansion ''Overdose'' abuses this to hell and back by taking the end-of-level miniboss from the first level of ''Painkiller'' and reusing him a grand total of '''over 50 times''', with more than a dozen showing up for each individual encounter.

to:

* Just about every Every boss in ''VideoGame/{{Painkiller}}'' was a unique one-shot, but the fan-made expansion ''Overdose'' abuses this to hell and back by taking the end-of-level miniboss from the first level of ''Painkiller'' and reusing him a grand total of '''over 50 times''', with more than a dozen showing up for each individual encounter.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}'', a pair of Vores are fought as a boss battle at the end of Episode 2, then they become recurring enemies in the last two episodes.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}'', a ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}'':
** A
pair of Vores are fought as a boss battle at the end of Episode 2, then they become recurring enemies in the last two episodes.



** The Butcher is an Overlord demon and a challenging boss early on, but later you can dispatch countless Overlords who are even stronger, albeit without the cleaver.
*** Lampshaded in the third game with Cain's lore entry on the Butchers after killing one as a boss.

to:

** The Butcher is an Overlord demon and a challenging boss early on, but later you can dispatch countless Overlords who are even stronger, albeit without the cleaver.
***
cleaver. Lampshaded in the third game with Cain's lore entry on the Butchers after killing one as a boss.



* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRising'', the second boss you face is the LQ-84i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser LQ-84 models, which look and fight just like it.
** From the same game, the GRAD starts off as a midboss before becoming an EliteMook in both later stages and the Dlc.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRising'', the ''VideoGame/MetalGearRising'':
** The
second boss you face is the LQ-84i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser LQ-84 models, which look and fight just like it.it.
** The GRAD starts off as a midboss before becoming an EliteMook in both later stages and the Dlc.

** From the same game, the GRAD starts off as a midboss before becoming an EliteMook in both later stages and the Dlc.



* Used, in a fashion, in ''VideoGame/MechWarrior3'' and the first two games ''VideoGame/MechWarrior 4'' series. Due to the presence of a stronger narrative structure in those games, various named enemy characters are present, many of whom serve as 'bosses' of a sort. As there is no character level structure in the series, the only thing determining the difficulty most enemies is what they ride, especially in comparison to the player's HumongousMecha. Early on, players will often be in light or medium 'Mechs, and enemy heavies and assaults can be cast as 'boss' encounters. As the game advances though, what would have been a boss encounter is degraded to a common enemy, usually by virtue of the player having salvaged materiel that puts them on par with the enemy.
** In ''VideoGame/MechWarrior3'' for instance, the player starts in a basic medium 'Mech, and is tasked to fight mostly smaller, less well armed or armored machines. The first 'boss' fight is a MirrorMatch against an enemy using the same model of 'Mech as the player, and later boss characters often involve the introduction of dangerous heavy or assault 'Mechs at the end of a mission. By the later missions, though, the player's starting Mech is plainly outclassed, but the enemy will still use that chassis, and they become little more than speed bumps by that point.
** ''VideoGame/MechWarrior 4'' also features this. The player starts in another medium Mech, but will fight against superior heavies and assault class machines as named encounters, including going up against several LightningBruiser designs. Come the end of the game, though, even those designs are not the challenge they once were.

to:

* Used, in a fashion, in ''VideoGame/MechWarrior3'' and the first two games ''VideoGame/MechWarrior 4'' series. ''VideoGame/MechWarrior'':
**
Due to the presence of a stronger narrative structure in those the games, various named enemy characters are present, many of whom serve as 'bosses' of a sort. As there is no character level structure in the series, the only thing determining the difficulty most enemies is what they ride, especially in comparison to the player's HumongousMecha. Early on, players will often be in light or medium 'Mechs, and enemy heavies and assaults can be cast as 'boss' encounters. As the game advances though, what would have been a boss encounter is degraded to a common enemy, usually by virtue of the player having salvaged materiel that puts them on par with the enemy.
** In ''VideoGame/MechWarrior3'' for instance, ''VideoGame/MechWarrior3'', the player starts in a basic medium 'Mech, and is tasked to fight mostly smaller, less well armed or armored machines. The first 'boss' fight is a MirrorMatch against an enemy using the same model of 'Mech as the player, and later boss characters often involve the introduction of dangerous heavy or assault 'Mechs at the end of a mission. By the later missions, though, the player's starting Mech is plainly outclassed, but the enemy will still use that chassis, and they become little more than speed bumps by that point.
** ''VideoGame/MechWarrior 4'' also features this.4''. The player starts in another medium Mech, but will fight against superior heavies and assault class machines as named encounters, including going up against several LightningBruiser designs. Come the end of the game, though, even those designs are not the challenge they once were.



* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', Kael'Thas Sunstrider starts off the first expansion as one of the final endgame bosses who required a group of 40 players in max level gear to reliably take down. Two major updates and one necromantic encounter later he's still a final boss... but of a dungeon that any 5-man group of newly-max-level players can take down without too much trouble. It also happens when a boss uses a unique model that is well liked, and is then later on reused for other enemies.
** Many raid bosses with unique models are later reskinned and modified to act as mooks or other bosses, often of dungeons in later expansions.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', Kael'Thas Sunstrider starts off the first expansion as one of the final endgame bosses who required a group of 40 players in max level gear to reliably take down. Two major updates and one necromantic encounter later he's still a final boss... but of a dungeon that any 5-man group of newly-max-level players can take down without too much trouble. It also happens when a boss uses a unique model that is well liked, and is then later on reused for other enemies.
**
enemies. Many raid bosses with unique models are also later reskinned and modified to act as mooks or other bosses, often of dungeons in later expansions.



* ''VideoGame/GuildWars Nightfall'', a powerful boss early in the game is a construct made of floating stone fragments called the [[http://gw.gamewikis.org/wiki/Apocrypha Apocrypha]]. In the final third of the game, identical creatures appear in large group as regular encounters, and are called "graven monoliths."
** And in Factions, the first mission on the mainland has you fighting a Shiro'ken boss at the end, while by the second to last mission, the Shiro'ken are essentially elite mooks.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GuildWars Nightfall'', a powerful boss early in the game is a construct made of floating stone fragments called the [[http://gw.gamewikis.org/wiki/Apocrypha Apocrypha]]. In the final third of the game, identical creatures appear in large group as regular encounters, and are called "graven monoliths."
**
" And in Factions, the first mission on the mainland has you fighting a Shiro'ken boss at the end, while by the second to last mission, the Shiro'ken are essentially elite mooks.



* TheButcher in ''VideoGame/RustyHearts'' starts out as the boss of the Subterranean Canals B2, but turns into a regular (though slightly more powerful than normal) enemy on the Hard and Very Hard difficulties in Wine Cellar 1F.
** In fact, all Butcher-type enemies (Armored Butcher, Hammer Butcher, Gloves, etc.) become degraded bosses later on in the game. In [[HarderThanHard Blood Mode]] versions of certain levels, you'll fight at least one Butcher in every room before the boss.

to:

* TheButcher in ''VideoGame/RustyHearts'' starts out as the boss of the Subterranean Canals B2, but turns into a regular (though slightly more powerful than normal) enemy on the Hard and Very Hard difficulties in Wine Cellar 1F.
**
1F. In fact, all Butcher-type enemies (Armored Butcher, Hammer Butcher, Gloves, etc.) become degraded bosses later on in the game. In [[HarderThanHard Blood Mode]] versions of certain levels, you'll fight at least one Butcher in every room before the boss.



*** ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaTheAdventureRebirth'' has the first boss appear a few times on the final level as a normal enemy. It has less health than when it was fought as a boss.

to:

*** ** ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaTheAdventureRebirth'' has the first boss appear a few times on the final level as a normal enemy. It has less health than when it was fought as a boss.



** ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow Aria of Sorrow]]'' loved this. The first four bosses become regular enemies later. There's even [[PaletteSwap more powerful]] versions of these enemies later on.
*** The Man Eater is an inversion. It's a regular enemy that shows up in the BossRush mode for some reason. ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'' brings it back as a full-fledged boss.

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow Aria of Sorrow]]'' loved this. The first four bosses become regular enemies later. There's even [[PaletteSwap more powerful]] versions of these enemies later on.
***
on. The Man Eater is an inversion. It's a regular enemy that shows up in the BossRush mode for some reason. ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'' brings it back as a full-fledged boss.



** The Frankenstein's Monster Boss has bounced back and forth from boss, to normal enemy, to boss over many of the later games.
*** ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'' had it both ways, with several palette swapped Frankenstein's Monster types as normal enemies (The Creature-which is the name the original boss and most normal enemy incarnations go by, Enkidu, Rebuild) and one as a boss (Goliath)

to:

** The Frankenstein's Monster Boss has bounced back and forth from boss, to normal enemy, to boss over many of the later games.
***
games. ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia'' had it both ways, with several palette swapped Frankenstein's Monster types as normal enemies (The Creature-which is the name the original boss and most normal enemy incarnations go by, Enkidu, Rebuild) and one as a boss (Goliath)



** The Dullahan enemy moves up from {{Mook}} to WakeUpCallBoss in ''Portrait of Ruin'', only to go back to Mook just one game later in ''Order of Ecclesia''. Though the mook version is often called Durhan.
*** Series wise, the boss version could be a KingMook variation. Before and after, it's a mook, that one time it's a boss. However, they appear as mooks again in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDespair'', exactly the same as in Portrait of Ruin (giant, hard to get around with projectiles that curse, and you have to hit a floating head).

to:

** The Dullahan enemy moves up from {{Mook}} to WakeUpCallBoss in ''Portrait of Ruin'', only to go back to Mook just one game later in ''Order of Ecclesia''. Though the mook version is often called Durhan.
***
Durhan. Series wise, the boss version could be is a KingMook variation. Before and after, it's a mook, that one time it's a boss. However, they appear as mooks again in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaHarmonyOfDespair'', exactly the same as in Portrait of Ruin (giant, hard to get around with projectiles that curse, and you have to hit a floating head).



* In ''VideoGame/MegaManX8'', various enemy reploids in the final stage use copy chips to turn into duplicates of Sigma, the heroes' recurring nemesis (and final boss of the first seven games). Fortunately, they only have access to Sigma's original body, not any of the nightmarish battle forms he loves to inflict on the player.

to:

* ''Franchise/MegaMan'':
**
In ''VideoGame/MegaManX8'', various enemy reploids in the final stage use copy chips to turn into duplicates of Sigma, the heroes' recurring nemesis (and final boss of the first seven games). Fortunately, they only have access to Sigma's original body, not any of the nightmarish battle forms he loves to inflict on the player.



** The recent gameplay videos for ''Rockman Online'' have shown old bosses such as [[VideoGame/MegaMan5 Stone Man]] as normal enemies.

to:

** The recent gameplay videos for ''Rockman Online'' have shown old bosses such as [[VideoGame/MegaMan5 Stone Man]] as normal enemies.



* In ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', some of the stages operated by Eggman contained enemies that were near-duplicates of E-102 Gamma from the previous game. Interestingly, in ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure,'' Gamma was both a player character ''and'' a boss, ''and'' made occasional appearances as an NPC, so he ends up having had quite a varied career.
** There's also the fact that in ''Sonic Adventure 2'', Bigfoot troops showed up as the first bosses for the hero and dark side story archs. When they show up again in ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'', they are reduced to standard enemies in the stage 5 and stage 6 options.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', some of the stages operated by Eggman contained enemies that were near-duplicates of E-102 Gamma from the previous game. Interestingly, in ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure,'' Gamma was both a player character ''and'' a boss, ''and'' made occasional appearances as an NPC, so he ends up having had quite a varied career.
** There's also the fact that in ''Sonic Adventure 2'',
career. Also, Bigfoot troops showed up as the first bosses for the hero and dark side story archs. When they show up again in ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'', they are reduced to standard enemies in the stage 5 and stage 6 options.



** In a PerspectiveFlip, ''you'' get to pull this off on the Dominion. After hijacking the Odin, an AwesomeButImpractical giant warmech, Swann makes the Degraded Boss version: the (smaller and relatively weaker, but cheaper) Thor, which ends up also being used by the Dominion since you have to leave the Odin behind.

to:

** In a PerspectiveFlip, ''you'' get to pull this off on the Dominion. After hijacking the Odin, an AwesomeButImpractical giant warmech, Swann makes the Degraded Boss version: the (smaller and relatively weaker, but cheaper) Thor, which ends up also being used by the Dominion since you have to leave the Odin behind.



* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'''s "The Answer" more then likely caused some episodes of PTSD when one of the most challenging bosses from the main game, The World Balance, showed up as a regular encounter ''with all its moves and stats intact''.

to:

* ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'':
**
''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'''s "The Answer" more then likely caused some episodes of PTSD when one of the most challenging bosses from the main game, The World Balance, showed up as a regular encounter ''with all its moves and stats intact''.



* In ''VideoGame/FableII'', even TheDragon is not immune to this; after you kill the Commandant very similar looking people who have the same powers and abilities appear. This is at least a justified case, as the Commandant is introduced as a prototype, and similar creations are explicitly being mass-produced during the 10 year interval at the game's halfway point.
** Also the boss Thag the Impatient later returns as common Bandit chiefs.
** In ''VideoGame/FableIII'', downgraded versions of Captain Saker and Lieutenant Simmons (deceased) appear once you've defeated them and are a high enough level.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/FableII'', even ''VideoGame/FableII'':
**
TheDragon is not immune to this; after you kill the Commandant very similar looking people who have the same powers and abilities appear. This is at least a justified case, as the Commandant is introduced as a prototype, and similar creations are explicitly being mass-produced during the 10 year interval at the game's halfway point.
** Also the The boss Thag the Impatient later returns as common Bandit chiefs.
** * In ''VideoGame/FableIII'', downgraded versions of Captain Saker and Lieutenant Simmons (deceased) appear once you've defeated them and are a high enough level.



** For that matter, post game you can fight bosses as normal enemies. Even the ones that actually were bosses.

to:

** For that matter, post Post game you can fight bosses as normal enemies. Even the ones that actually were bosses.



* The first boss you face in the main storyline of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' is an ogre, which becomes a normal enemy later in the game (with more powerful versions at times.) Justified in that you're trying to ''re''take an area that's off to one side of the main battle, and the darkspawn would've just sent a strike force consisting of their normal troops to take it in the first place.
** The DynamicDifficulty of the game scales all monsters to the PlayerCharacter's level, with Normal enemies being slighly weaker than the PC; Lieutenants, slighly stronger; and Bosses, about as strong as your entire party combined (don't ask about Elite Bosses). Said first Ogre you encounter (at level 4-5) is a Boss, yet all subsequent Ogres are Lieutenants, so they are simultaneously stronger that the first one and weaker than yourself during all subsequent encounters.
** Same thing happens in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'': an ogre is the very first boss you fight in the game (twice), and even Flemeth comments on how impressive it is to beat one. The next ones you meet in the end of Act I are considerably less difficult. By Act III, Hawke and Companions will crunch them for breakfast.
** Like the ogres in the previous entries, pride demons also suffer this in ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition Inquisition]]'': one serves as the first boss, where it's actually fairly tough, but later they start showing up in groups with much less HP, or being spat out of Fade Rifts along with other demons. Part of this is that it has regenerating armor that you have to disrupt the rift to take down, a mechanic that never shows up again.

to:

* The first boss you face in the main storyline of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' is an ogre, which becomes a normal enemy later in the game (with more powerful versions at times.) Justified in that you're trying to ''re''take an area that's off to one side of the main battle, and the darkspawn would've just sent a strike force consisting of their normal troops to take it in the first place.
** The DynamicDifficulty of the game scales all monsters to the PlayerCharacter's level, with Normal enemies being slighly weaker than the PC; Lieutenants, slighly stronger; and Bosses, about as strong as your entire party combined (don't ask about Elite Bosses). Said first Ogre you encounter (at level 4-5) is a Boss, yet all subsequent Ogres are Lieutenants, so they are simultaneously stronger that the first one and weaker than yourself during all subsequent encounters.
**
place. Same thing happens in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'': an ogre is the very first boss you fight in the game (twice), and even Flemeth comments on how impressive it is to beat one. The next ones you meet in the end of Act I are considerably less difficult. By Act III, Hawke and Companions will crunch them for breakfast.
** Like the ogres in the previous entries, pride * Pride demons also suffer this in ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition Inquisition]]'': ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'': one serves as the first boss, where it's actually fairly tough, but later they start showing up in groups with much less HP, or being spat out of Fade Rifts along with other demons. Part of this is that it has regenerating armor that you have to disrupt the rift to take down, a mechanic that never shows up again.



* ''VideoGame/LegendOfLegaia'' has you fight against two [[ShockAndAwe Viguro]] early in the game. They're second-tier Seru while you're still on first-tier spells. Interesting in that it is still possible to [[PowerCopying absorb them]] in this fight if you're lucky enough, giving you a considerable boost in damage output for as long as you can meet the higher MP requirement.
** The Kemaro mini-boss fight is a lesser example.

to:

* ''VideoGame/LegendOfLegaia'' has you fight against two [[ShockAndAwe Viguro]] early in the game. They're second-tier Seru while you're still on first-tier spells. Interesting in that it is still possible to [[PowerCopying absorb them]] in this fight if you're lucky enough, giving you a considerable boost in damage output for as long as you can meet the higher MP requirement.
**
requirement. The Kemaro mini-boss fight is a lesser example.



* ''VideoGame/StarOcean1'' has a case of a boss being degraded before you fight him. It's the Velcant. It's a rare random encounter in his dungeon, so some people don't run into it. What's worse is it's a WakeUpCallBoss, one that either forces you to grind or forces you to learn how to effectively use the battle system and control the party rather than just mashing A and let the AI control your other party members.



** In the BonusDungeon of ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'', this happens multiple times. The boss of one floor of the dungeon will often be a random encounter on the next.
** ''VideoGame/StarOcean1'' has a case of a boss being degraded before you fight him. It's the Velcant. It's a rare random encounter in his dungeon, so some people don't run into it. What's worse is it's a WakeUpCallBoss, one that either forces you to grind or forces you to learn how to effectively use the battle system and control the party rather than just mashing A and let the AI control your other party members.

to:

** * In the BonusDungeon of ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory'', this happens multiple times. The boss of one floor of the dungeon will often be a random encounter on the next.
** ''VideoGame/StarOcean1'' has a case of a boss being degraded before you fight him. It's the Velcant. It's a rare random encounter in his dungeon, so some people don't run into it. What's worse is it's a WakeUpCallBoss, one that either forces you to grind or forces you to learn how to effectively use the battle system and control the party rather than just mashing A and let the AI control your other party members.
next.



* In the original VideoGame/PaperMario, the Putrid Piranhas were midbosses encountered twice in a Chapter 5. In the sequel, they are ordinary mooks, also encountered in chapter 5, oddly enough.

to:

* In the original VideoGame/PaperMario, the ''VideoGame/PaperMario'':
** The
Putrid Piranhas were midbosses encountered twice in a Chapter 5. In the sequel, they are ordinary mooks, also encountered in chapter 5, oddly enough.



* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioColorSplash'', Shunned Guy is the boss of the early stage [[UndergroundLevel Indigo Underground]] and is a major threat due to being immune to both Mario's Jump and Hammer. Mario gains more options as he goes through the game, and when Shunned Guy reappears in the late-game stage [[LocomotiveLevel Sunset Express]], he's more an annoyance than anything, and is a non-special, albeit rare encounter. For further degradation, Shunned Guy is whom Mario will play RockPaperScissors with in Roshambo Temple #3 if the Rock Paper Wizard isn't there.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioColorSplash'', ''VideoGame/PaperMarioColorSplash'':
**
Shunned Guy is the boss of the early stage [[UndergroundLevel Indigo Underground]] and is a major threat due to being immune to both Mario's Jump and Hammer. Mario gains more options as he goes through the game, and when Shunned Guy reappears in the late-game stage [[LocomotiveLevel Sunset Express]], he's more an annoyance than anything, and is a non-special, albeit rare encounter. For further degradation, Shunned Guy is whom Mario will play RockPaperScissors with in Roshambo Temple #3 if the Rock Paper Wizard isn't there.



* Big Core in the ''VideoGame/{{Gradius}}'' series as a whole; they were the first game's RecurringBoss and came back for [[BossRush Boss Rushes]] in subsequent games. In ''Gradius V'', they've been reduced to regular enemy status, appearing frequently in Stage 1, 3, and 7 and getting killed pretty quickly. To compenstate with this issue, a modified Big Core appears as a stage boss in Stage 1.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Gradius}}'':
**
Big Core in the ''VideoGame/{{Gradius}}'' series as a whole; they were the first game's RecurringBoss and came back for [[BossRush Boss Rushes]] in subsequent games. In ''Gradius V'', they've been reduced to regular enemy status, appearing frequently in Stage 1, 3, and 7 and getting killed pretty quickly. To compenstate with this issue, a modified Big Core appears as a stage boss in Stage 1.



* The first boss of ''RayStorm'', Pendragon returns as a MiniBoss in the Judgement and Emotion stages of ''RayCrisis''. In the same game, Sem-Slut/Strut, the boss of the Emotion stage, appears in mook form in the Memory and Consciousness stages.

to:

* The first boss of ''RayStorm'', ''VideoGame/RayStorm'', Pendragon returns as a MiniBoss in the Judgement and Emotion stages of ''RayCrisis''. In the same game, Sem-Slut/Strut, the boss of the Emotion stage, appears in mook form in the Memory and Consciousness stages.



** The fangame ''Concealed the Conclusion'' is full of those: Flandre and Mokou ({{Bonus Boss}}es in original games) are stage 1 {{miniboss}}es, Kaguya and Mima (originally {{Final Boss}}es) are stage 1 bosses, powerhouses like Remilia, Eirin, Eiki and Yuuka are on stages 2-3, etc.
** Generally speaking, if a characters recurs they'll be showing up a midboss the second time. Though this can be a promotion if they went from a boss of an early stage to an EX midboss.

to:

** * The ''Touhou'' fangame ''Concealed the Conclusion'' is full of those: Flandre and Mokou ({{Bonus Boss}}es in original games) are stage 1 {{miniboss}}es, Kaguya and Mima (originally {{Final Boss}}es) are stage 1 bosses, powerhouses like Remilia, Eirin, Eiki and Yuuka are on stages 2-3, etc.
** Generally speaking, if a characters recurs they'll be showing up a midboss the second time. Though this can be a promotion if they went from a boss of an early stage to an EX midboss.
etc.



28th Apr '17 2:05:54 AM ZombieAladdin
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* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioColorSplash'', Shunned Guy is the boss of the early stage [[UndergroundLevel Indigo Underground]] and is a major threat due to being immune to both Mario's Jump and Hammer. Mario gains more options as he goes through the game, and when Shunned Guy reappears in the late-game stage [[LocomotiveLevel Sunset Express]], he's more an annoyance than anything, and the encounter is not treated as anything special. For further degradation, Shunned Guy is a competitor in the region's RockPaperScissors tournaments.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioColorSplash'', Shunned Guy is the boss of the early stage [[UndergroundLevel Indigo Underground]] and is a major threat due to being immune to both Mario's Jump and Hammer. Mario gains more options as he goes through the game, and when Shunned Guy reappears in the late-game stage [[LocomotiveLevel Sunset Express]], he's more an annoyance than anything, and the encounter is not treated as anything special. a non-special, albeit rare encounter. For further degradation, Shunned Guy is a competitor in the region's whom Mario will play RockPaperScissors tournaments.with in Roshambo Temple #3 if the Rock Paper Wizard isn't there.
** Black Shy Guy is a mini-boss in Violet Passage on your first visit, with the mini-boss music playing when you fight him. He is then treated as a normal enemy that can always be found in one corner of Fort Cobalt. In a true instance of boss degradation, Mario can whack the Black Shy Guy in Fort Cobalt with his hammer to instantly defeat him without a fight.
28th Apr '17 2:03:48 AM ZombieAladdin
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* A chain chomp served as [[DualBoss one half of]] the Chapter 2 boss in the first game, but were made ordinary enemies in both Thousand Year Door and Super Paper Mario.
** Atomic Boo debuted as an [[BonusBoss optional boss]] in Thousand Year Door. In Super Paper Mario, they are ordinary enemies.

to:

* ** A chain chomp served as [[DualBoss one half of]] the Chapter 2 boss in the first game, but were made ordinary enemies in both Thousand Year Door and Super Paper Mario.
** Atomic Boo debuted as an [[BonusBoss optional boss]] in Thousand Year Door. In Super Paper Mario, they are ordinary enemies.
Mario.


Added DiffLines:

* Atomic Boo debuted as an [[BonusBoss optional boss]] in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor''. In Super Paper Mario, they are ordinary enemies.
* In ''VideoGame/PaperMarioColorSplash'', Shunned Guy is the boss of the early stage [[UndergroundLevel Indigo Underground]] and is a major threat due to being immune to both Mario's Jump and Hammer. Mario gains more options as he goes through the game, and when Shunned Guy reappears in the late-game stage [[LocomotiveLevel Sunset Express]], he's more an annoyance than anything, and the encounter is not treated as anything special. For further degradation, Shunned Guy is a competitor in the region's RockPaperScissors tournaments.
11th Apr '17 10:02:20 AM erforce
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* In ''[[VideoGame/TheAngryVideoGameNerdAdventures The Angry Video Game Nerd II: ASSimilation]]'', [[HockeyMaskAndChainsaw Jimmy]] from the first game's "Boo! Haunted House" DualBoss fight returns as a GiantMook in the Monster Madness stages.

to:

* In ''[[VideoGame/TheAngryVideoGameNerdAdventures The Angry Video Game Nerd II: ASSimilation]]'', ''VideoGame/TheAngryVideoGameNerdIIAssimilation'', [[HockeyMaskAndChainsaw Jimmy]] from the first game's "Boo! Haunted House" DualBoss fight returns as a GiantMook in the Monster Madness stages.
7th Apr '17 12:18:40 PM nighttrainfm
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* In ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', an YMIR heavy mech is the first boss. As the game progresses, they show up frequently as [[EliteMook elite mooks]], sometimes in pairs. They're never easy, and in the harder battles (especially when they start out near the party, since they can absolutely shred [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou Shepard]] at short range), they qualify as BossInMookClothing, and are sometimes harder than actual bosses.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', an YMIR heavy mech is the first boss. As the game progresses, they show up frequently as [[EliteMook elite mooks]], sometimes in pairs. They're never easy, and in the harder battles (especially when they start out near the party, since they can absolutely shred [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou Shepard]] at short range), they qualify as BossInMookClothing, and are sometimes harder than actual bosses.''Franchise/MassEffect'':



** Inverted with the [[SpiderTank Geth Colossus]] and [[SandWorm Thresher Maw]]. In the first game, you'd probably end up killing a dozen of each due to the fact that you had the [[AwesomePersonnelCarrier Mako IFV]] (though you could always fight them on foot if you were feeling [[SuicidalOverconfidence suicidally overconfident]]). However, in the second game, only one of each is fought; since you ''have'' to fight them on foot this time, they're treated as bosses.
** In ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'', an YMIR heavy mech is the first boss. As the game progresses, they show up frequently as [[EliteMook elite mooks]], sometimes in pairs. They're never easy, and in the harder battles (especially when they start out near the party, since they can absolutely shred [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou Shepard]] at short range), they qualify as BossInMookClothing, and are sometimes harder than actual bosses.



** Inverted with the [[SpiderTank Geth Colossus]] and [[SandWorm Thresher Maw]]. In the first game, you'd probably end up killing a dozen of each due to the fact that you had the [[AwesomePersonnelCarrier Mako IFV]] (though you could always fight them on foot if you were feeling [[SuicidalOverconfidence suicidally overconfident]]). However, in the second game, only one of each is fought; since you ''have'' to fight them on foot this time, they're treated as bosses.
** This happens to the Geth Prime on a meta level between games. In the first game there's only one Prime you're forced to fight on foot, as a mini-boss in the leadup to the endgame, but in the second they're reduced to level bosses and by the third game you're fighting several at once.

to:

** Inverted with the [[SpiderTank Geth Colossus]] and [[SandWorm Thresher Maw]]. In the first game, you'd probably end up killing a dozen of each due to the fact that you had the [[AwesomePersonnelCarrier Mako IFV]] (though you could always fight them on foot if you were feeling [[SuicidalOverconfidence suicidally overconfident]]). However, in the second game, only one of each is fought; since you ''have'' to fight them on foot this time, they're treated as bosses.
** This happens to the Geth Prime on a meta level between games. In the first game game, there's only one Prime you're forced to fight on foot, as a mini-boss in the leadup to the endgame, but in the second they're reduced to level bosses and by the third game you're fighting several at once.
23rd Mar '17 1:29:10 AM Carnel
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*** [[spoiler:Metal General]] from ''VideoGame/KirbysReturnToDreamLand'' returns as a common miniboss in the final area under the name [[spoiler:Security Force]].

to:

*** [[spoiler:Metal General]] from ''VideoGame/KirbysReturnToDreamLand'' returns as a common miniboss in the final area under the name [[spoiler:Security Force]]. By the end of the game, it further degrades into a GiantMook.
22nd Mar '17 9:22:12 AM dimentiorules
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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRising'', the second boss you face is the Lq84-i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser Lq-84 models, which look and fight just like it.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRising'', the second boss you face is the Lq84-i, LQ-84i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser Lq-84 LQ-84 models, which look and fight just like it.
22nd Mar '17 8:57:44 AM dimentiorules
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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengance'', the second boss you face is the Lq84-i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser Lq-84 models, which look and fight just like it.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengance'', ''VideoGame/MetalGearRising'', the second boss you face is the Lq84-i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser Lq-84 models, which look and fight just like it.
22nd Mar '17 8:57:08 AM dimentiorules
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to:

* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengance'', the second boss you face is the Lq84-i, AKA blade wolf. Later on, you fight lesser Lq-84 models, which look and fight just like it.
** From the same game, the GRAD starts off as a midboss before becoming an EliteMook in both later stages and the Dlc.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DegradedBoss