History Main / DeadLineNews

25th Nov '17 10:39:03 AM Malady
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* Reporter Herb Morrison's eyewitness account of the {{Hindenburg}} explosion May 6, 1937, is as memorable as the event itself. It was the inspiration for countless dramatic portrayals of badass broadcasters engaging in similar heroics.

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* Reporter Herb Morrison's eyewitness account of the {{Hindenburg}} UsefulNotes/TheHindenburg explosion May 6, 1937, is as memorable as the event itself. It was the inspiration for countless dramatic portrayals of badass broadcasters engaging in similar heroics.



* If World War III had ever broken out during the 1950s-1980s period, emergency broadcast protocols actually would have called for radio stations to continue broadcasting emergency instructions for as long as possible - meaning until the bombs hit or until their emergency generators ran out of juice after the attack. Although pre-recorded messages were created (with the BBC known to have developed an entertainment-style program to keep morale up), someone had to be available to provide current information.[[note]]Many fictionalized accounts of nuclear war or other world-ending disaster depict reporters panicking or breaking down emotionally [[{{Hindenburg}} Herb Morrison]] style at the prospect. This page features numerous examples.[[/note]] These days this trope likely applies less as many emergency notification messages are now delivered via computerized voice and should the need arise the system could be programmed remotely to provide information, or a report can be "phoned in" without the need to have a live person sitting at a studio microphone near a potential ground zero.

to:

* If World War III had ever broken out during the 1950s-1980s period, emergency broadcast protocols actually would have called for radio stations to continue broadcasting emergency instructions for as long as possible - meaning until the bombs hit or until their emergency generators ran out of juice after the attack. Although pre-recorded messages were created (with the BBC known to have developed an entertainment-style program to keep morale up), someone had to be available to provide current information.[[note]]Many fictionalized accounts of nuclear war or other world-ending disaster depict reporters panicking or breaking down emotionally [[{{Hindenburg}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Hindenburg}} Herb Morrison]] style at the prospect. This page features numerous examples.[[/note]] These days this trope likely applies less as many emergency notification messages are now delivered via computerized voice and should the need arise the system could be programmed remotely to provide information, or a report can be "phoned in" without the need to have a live person sitting at a studio microphone near a potential ground zero.
21st Nov '17 6:03:03 PM nombretomado
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* On September 8, 1934, the luxury liner SS ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Morro_Castle_(1930) Morro Castle]]'' caught fire near Long Beach Island, NJ. Radio broke the news first and covered the events throughout the day. The CoastGuard cutter ''Tampa'' tried to tow her, but in rough waters the tow line snapped and the smouldering hulk drifted in toward shore at Asbury Park. WCAP's Tom Burley had been just about to pause for a station break; he said "The ''Morro Castle'' is adrift and heading for the shore--" looked up, and cried out ''"My God! She's coming right in here!"'' She struck ground about a hundred yards from the broadcast booth.

to:

* On September 8, 1934, the luxury liner SS ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Morro_Castle_(1930) Morro Castle]]'' caught fire near Long Beach Island, NJ. Radio broke the news first and covered the events throughout the day. The CoastGuard UsefulNotes/CoastGuard cutter ''Tampa'' tried to tow her, but in rough waters the tow line snapped and the smouldering hulk drifted in toward shore at Asbury Park. WCAP's Tom Burley had been just about to pause for a station break; he said "The ''Morro Castle'' is adrift and heading for the shore--" looked up, and cried out ''"My God! She's coming right in here!"'' She struck ground about a hundred yards from the broadcast booth.
25th Sep '17 5:27:23 AM JackG
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* A blink-and-you-miss-it version in ''Film/TheSumOfAllFears''. A television in the Baltimore hospital that is hit by the nuclear blast is screening a live report of the President's emergency evacuation from Baltimore Stadium (where the bomb is). The screen goes white a fraction of a second before the blast wave hits.

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* A blink-and-you-miss-it version in ''Film/TheSumOfAllFears''. A television in the Baltimore hospital that is hit by the nuclear blast is screening a live report of the President's emergency evacuation from Baltimore Stadium the stadium (where the bomb is). The screen goes white a fraction of a second before the blast wave hits.
25th Sep '17 5:26:47 AM JackG
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Added DiffLines:

* A blink-and-you-miss-it version in ''Film/TheSumOfAllFears''. A television in the Baltimore hospital that is hit by the nuclear blast is screening a live report of the President's emergency evacuation from Baltimore Stadium (where the bomb is). The screen goes white a fraction of a second before the blast wave hits.
15th Sep '17 1:06:02 PM Gravidef
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* A truly disturbing example comes in the SeriesFinale of the Jim Henson property ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}''. The main plot of the episode sees the WESAYSO corporation destroying the mating grounds of a particular insect; [[ForWantOfANail the missing beetles leads to a chain of events]] that ultimately results in snow clouds forming that will lead to the ''mass extinction of all life on Earth'', a SuddenDownerEnding and GreenAesop taken to the extreme. To hammer the point home, the penultimate scene shows the main characters gathered around a television set watching news anchor Howard Handupme deliver the final forecast: "And taking a look at the long range forecast: continued snow, darkness, and extreme cold. This is Howard Handupme. Goodnight... goodbye." We then cut to the family's home being gradually covered with snow.

to:

* A truly disturbing example comes in the SeriesFinale of the Jim Henson property ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}''. The main plot of the episode sees the WESAYSO corporation destroying the mating grounds of a particular insect; [[ForWantOfANail the missing beetles lack of the bugs leads to a chain of events]] that ultimately results in snow clouds forming that will lead to the ''mass extinction of all life on Earth'', a SuddenDownerEnding and GreenAesop taken to the extreme. To hammer the point home, the penultimate scene shows the main characters gathered around a television set watching news anchor Howard Handupme deliver the final forecast: "And taking a look at the long range forecast: continued snow, darkness, and extreme cold. This is Howard Handupme. Goodnight... goodbye." We then cut to the family's home being gradually covered with snow.snow...
15th Sep '17 1:03:38 PM Gravidef
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Added DiffLines:

* A truly disturbing example comes in the SeriesFinale of the Jim Henson property ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}''. The main plot of the episode sees the WESAYSO corporation destroying the mating grounds of a particular insect; [[ForWantOfANail the missing beetles leads to a chain of events]] that ultimately results in snow clouds forming that will lead to the ''mass extinction of all life on Earth'', a SuddenDownerEnding and GreenAesop taken to the extreme. To hammer the point home, the penultimate scene shows the main characters gathered around a television set watching news anchor Howard Handupme deliver the final forecast: "And taking a look at the long range forecast: continued snow, darkness, and extreme cold. This is Howard Handupme. Goodnight... goodbye." We then cut to the family's home being gradually covered with snow.
3rd Sep '17 11:38:54 AM CaptEquinox
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* Creator/{{CNN}}'s coverage of the massive [[http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/06/02/cnn.tiananmen.coverage/ 1989 Chinese student rebellion]] was this, especially when Chinese authorities came to the bureau and ordered them to stop transmitting. They kept right on sending until the cameras were turned off. [[http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/01/world/asia/tiananmen-chinoy/index.html This coverage influences the world's view of China]] to this day. Twenty years later, Chinese officials [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGHd2bPn4ZU blocked CNN from carrying a memorial gathering]].
23rd Aug '17 11:49:42 AM ZombieAladdin
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* A rather complicated example in ''WesternAnimation/OsmosisJones'': After Thrax had malfunctioned Frank's brain causing his body temperature to skyrocket to dangerous levels, the NNN (Neural News Network) reporters, at their station, promise their viewers to stay on the air for as long as they can, delivered in a tense manner as we see NNN footage of various body parts collapsing and shutting down. It's not the intense heat that injures them though, but infighting stemming from them feeling agitated. They do survive once Frank is cured, but both of them now have [[InstantBandages patches, casts, and gauze on them]].
8th Aug '17 3:53:21 PM CaptEquinox
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* On the morning of December 6, 1917, a French munitions ship loaded with explosives collided with another ship and caught fire. At the railyard near Pier 6 where the burning ship drifted in, dispatcher Vince Coleman and a coworker were told what was happening and ran for their lives -- only for Coleman to turn back when he remembered a passenger train was about to come in. He ran back to the station and sent out one telegraph message after another warning the train to stop. His messages were received by other stations down the line, letting officials respond. All incoming trains stopped in time. ''Hold up the train. Ammunition ship afire in harbor making for Pier 6 and will explode. Guess this will be my last message. Good-bye boys.'' Minutes later the ship exploded, killing 2000 people, including Coleman.
* On September 8, 1934, the luxury liner SS ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Morro_Castle_(1930) Morro Castle]]'' caught fire. Radio broke the news first and covered the events throughout the day. The CoastGuard cutter ''Tampa'' tried to tow her, but in rough waters the tow line snapped and the smouldering hulk drifted in toward shore. WCAP's Tom Burley had been just about to pause for a station break; he said "The ''Morro Castle'' is adrift and heading for the shore--" looked up, and cried out ''"My God! She's coming right in here!"'' She didn't quite hit the broadcast booth, but hit the beach about a hundred yards away.

to:

* On the morning of December 6, 1917, a French munitions ship loaded with explosives collided with another ship and caught fire.fire in the Narrows Strait just off [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion Halifax, NS]]. At the railyard near Pier 6 where the burning ship drifted in, dispatcher Vince Coleman and a coworker were told what was happening and ran for their lives -- only for Coleman to turn back when he remembered a passenger train was about to come in. He ran back to the station and sent out one telegraph message after another warning the train to stop. His messages were received by other stations down the line, letting officials respond. All incoming trains stopped in time. ''Hold up the train. Ammunition ship afire in harbor making for Pier 6 and will explode. Guess this will be my last message. Good-bye boys.'' Minutes later the ship exploded, killing 2000 people, including Coleman.
* On September 8, 1934, the luxury liner SS ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Morro_Castle_(1930) Morro Castle]]'' caught fire.fire near Long Beach Island, NJ. Radio broke the news first and covered the events throughout the day. The CoastGuard cutter ''Tampa'' tried to tow her, but in rough waters the tow line snapped and the smouldering hulk drifted in toward shore. shore at Asbury Park. WCAP's Tom Burley had been just about to pause for a station break; he said "The ''Morro Castle'' is adrift and heading for the shore--" looked up, and cried out ''"My God! She's coming right in here!"'' She didn't quite hit the broadcast booth, but hit the beach struck ground about a hundred yards away.from the broadcast booth.
8th Aug '17 2:31:30 AM CaptEquinox
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* Reporter Herb Morrison's eyewitness account of the UsefulNotes/{{Hindenburg}} explosion is as memorable as the event itself. It was the inspiration for countless dramatic portrayals of badass broadcasters engaging in similar heroics.

to:

* On September 8, 1934, the luxury liner SS ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Morro_Castle_(1930) Morro Castle]]'' caught fire. Radio broke the news first and covered the events throughout the day. The CoastGuard cutter ''Tampa'' tried to tow her, but in rough waters the tow line snapped and the smouldering hulk drifted in toward shore. WCAP's Tom Burley had been just about to pause for a station break; he said "The ''Morro Castle'' is adrift and heading for the shore--" looked up, and cried out ''"My God! She's coming right in here!"'' She didn't quite hit the broadcast booth, but hit the beach about a hundred yards away.
* Reporter Herb Morrison's eyewitness account of the UsefulNotes/{{Hindenburg}} {{Hindenburg}} explosion May 6, 1937, is as memorable as the event itself. It was the inspiration for countless dramatic portrayals of badass broadcasters engaging in similar heroics.



* If World War III had ever broken out during the 1950s-1980s period, emergency broadcast protocols actually would have called for radio stations to continue broadcasting emergency instructions for as long as possible - meaning until the bombs hit or until their emergency generators ran out of juice after the attack. Although pre-recorded messages were created (with the BBC known to have developed an entertainment-style program to keep morale up), someone had to be available to provide current information.[[note]]Many fictionalized accounts of nuclear war or other world-ending disaster depict reporters panicking or breaking down emotionally [[UsefulNotes/{{Hindenburg}} Herb Morrison]] style at the prospect. This page features numerous examples.[[/note]] These days this trope likely applies less as many emergency notification messages are now delivered via computerized voice and should the need arise the system could be programmed remotely to provide information, or a report can be "phoned in" without the need to have a live person sitting at a studio microphone near a potential ground zero.

to:

* If World War III had ever broken out during the 1950s-1980s period, emergency broadcast protocols actually would have called for radio stations to continue broadcasting emergency instructions for as long as possible - meaning until the bombs hit or until their emergency generators ran out of juice after the attack. Although pre-recorded messages were created (with the BBC known to have developed an entertainment-style program to keep morale up), someone had to be available to provide current information.[[note]]Many fictionalized accounts of nuclear war or other world-ending disaster depict reporters panicking or breaking down emotionally [[UsefulNotes/{{Hindenburg}} [[{{Hindenburg}} Herb Morrison]] style at the prospect. This page features numerous examples.[[/note]] These days this trope likely applies less as many emergency notification messages are now delivered via computerized voice and should the need arise the system could be programmed remotely to provide information, or a report can be "phoned in" without the need to have a live person sitting at a studio microphone near a potential ground zero.
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