History Main / Cyberpunk

17th Feb '18 3:44:13 PM Nadezhda
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** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body transformation, [[spoiler:mad scientists]], seemingly dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. All of these films are badass for many reasons, mostly because they are so different from anything else. The directors don't mind being experimental and bizarre. The special effects are awesome - there's no CGI whatsoever. You are left wondering how they accomplished such results.[[note]]Mostly stop-motion animation[[/note]]

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** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body transformation, [[spoiler:mad scientists]], seemingly dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. All of these films are badass for many reasons, mostly because they are so different from anything else. The directors don't mind being experimental and bizarre. The special effects are awesome - there's no CGI whatsoever. You are left wondering how they accomplished such results.[[note]]Mostly stop-motion animation[[/note]]animation.[[/note]]
17th Feb '18 3:42:20 PM Nadezhda
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** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body modification, mad scientists, dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. All of these films are badass for many reasons, mostly because they are so different from anything else. The directors don't mind being experimental and bizarre. The special effects are awesome - there's no CGI whatsoever. You are left wondering how they accomplished such results.

to:

** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body modification, mad scientists, transformation, [[spoiler:mad scientists]], seemingly dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. All of these films are badass for many reasons, mostly because they are so different from anything else. The directors don't mind being experimental and bizarre. The special effects are awesome - there's no CGI whatsoever. You are left wondering how they accomplished such results.[[note]]Mostly stop-motion animation[[/note]]
16th Feb '18 9:29:49 AM Nadezhda
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** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body modification, mad scientists, dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. And Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. It's bad ass.

to:

** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body modification, mad scientists, dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. And Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. It's bad ass.All of these films are badass for many reasons, mostly because they are so different from anything else. The directors don't mind being experimental and bizarre. The special effects are awesome - there's no CGI whatsoever. You are left wondering how they accomplished such results.
16th Feb '18 9:17:50 AM Nadezhda
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* Japanese films Film/TetsuoTheIronMan, Burst City, Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover are prime examples of what the glorious scene of Japanese cyberpunk achieved. They are not straight 100% cyberpunk but have elements. Tetsuo is more futuristic in the sequels; the first movie focuses more on the body horror aspects.

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* Japanese films Films Film/TetsuoTheIronMan, Burst City, Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover are prime examples of what the glorious scene of Japanese cyberpunk achieved. They are not straight 100% cyberpunk but have elements. Tetsuo is more futuristic in the sequels; the first movie focuses more on the body horror aspects.
16th Feb '18 9:10:30 AM Nadezhda
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* Japanese films Film/TetsuoTheIronMan, Burst City, Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover are prime examples of what the glorious scene of Japanese cyberpunk achieved. They are not straight 100% cyberpunk but have elements. Tetsuo is more futuristic in the sequels; the first movie focuses more on the body horror aspects.
** Both Pinocchio 964 and Rubber's Lover were made by Shozin Fukui who worked with Shin'ya Tsukamoto, the creator of Tetsuo, and it shows. Shozin's work is very similar, dealing with the themes of body modification, mad scientists, dystopian societies, and a bit of sex. They are both abstract as well, with a somewhat disjointed way of telling a story. And Burst City was a movie made by Sogo Ishii and was basically a showcase of the punk rock scene in Japan in the 80s with some futuristic stuff thrown in. It's bad ass.
11th Feb '18 7:59:17 PM nombretomado
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%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out.



* ''VideoGame/{{Edge1993}}'' for the PC98 takes place in a futuristic city after most of the world was devastated by a gigantic magnetic wave.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Edge1993}}'' for the PC98 UsefulNotes/PC98 takes place in a futuristic city after most of the world was devastated by a gigantic magnetic wave.
7th Feb '18 1:56:59 AM hhaddow
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* ''VideoGame/{{Observer}}'' (stylized as >OBSERVER_) is a Cyber Punk thriller/horror game, it takes place in 2084 Poland, where after a "digital plague" known as the Nanophage and a resulting war, what remains of the country is controlled by the Chiron Corporation.
27th Jan '18 6:22:13 PM nombretomado
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** To a lesser extent, Hideo Kojima's other ''Franchise/MetalGear'' games also deal with cyberpunk themes, starting with ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' but becoming more prominent with ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid''. The setting is most noticeable in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' as it deals with many Cyber Punk and PostCyberPunk themes, especially its [[MGS2Ending ending, which has its very own page]] here.

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** To a lesser extent, Hideo Kojima's other ''Franchise/MetalGear'' games also deal with cyberpunk themes, starting with ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' but becoming more prominent with ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid''. The setting is most noticeable in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' as it deals with many Cyber Punk and PostCyberPunk themes, especially its [[MGS2Ending [[Synopsis/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty ending, which has its very own page]] here.
26th Jan '18 2:49:01 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/JohnnyMnemonic'' was adapted from an eponymous William Gibson short story (with a screenplay written by Gibson himself), but sadly fell victim to ExecutiveMeddling during production, with the final result sorely disappointing fans and creators alike.
* ''Film/StrangeDays'' is a unique example, being set only a few years in the future from when it was released, and featuring only a few pieces of futuristic technology.
* ''Film/{{Cherry 2000}}'' with elements of DesertPunk in the non-urban areas.

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* ''Film/JohnnyMnemonic'' was adapted from an eponymous William Gibson short story (with a screenplay written by Gibson himself), but sadly fell victim to ExecutiveMeddling during production, with story, some some elements also borrowed from Gibson's other stories set in the final result sorely disappointing fans Sprawl. The film features many of the flashy hallmarks of cyberpunk, including an evil MegaCorp conspiracy, implanted memories, cybernetic enhancements, assassins, outlaws, and creators alike.
so forth.
* ''Film/StrangeDays'' features a dystopian 1999 where crime is a unique example, being set only a few years rampant, the government (specifically law enforcement) is corrupt, and people are indulging in the future from when it was released, new drug of trading and featuring only a few pieces of futuristic technology.
reliving other people's memories.
* ''Film/{{Cherry 2000}}'' with features the urban cyberpunk elements of a MegaCorp employee looking to replace his android sexbot, while the outlaw elements of the genre have a DesertPunk in the non-urban areas.flavor.



%%* ''Film/{{Hackers}}''

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%%* ''Film/{{Hackers}}''* ''Film/{{Hackers}}'': A noble attempt to inject a cyberpunk aesthetic into present day (TheNineties) society by portraying hackers as a subculture of edgy, irreverent punks who fight an evil MegaCorp.



%%* ''Film/{{Freejack}}''

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%%* ''Film/{{Freejack}}''* ''Film/{{Freejack}}'': A dystopian future where the world is run by super-wealthy corporate elites with a transhumanist plot to give themselves eternal life.



%%* ''Film/{{Avalon}}''

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%%* ''Film/{{Avalon}}''* ''Film/{{Avalon}}'' includes a fully immersive computer reality, worlds-within-worlds and a futuristic, dystopian setting.



* ''An Orison of Sonmi 451'' from ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' plays out like a walking tribute to cyberpunk with its themes of consumerism, rebellion and oppressive governments, a [[CrapsaccharineWorld Crapsaccharine Society]] in the form of Nea So Copros, cloning and more. The [[Film/CloudAtlas film version]] takes it one step further, by mixing in references - both visual and theme wise - from other works such as ''Film/BladeRunner'', ''Film/TheMatrix'' (not surprising, considering who co-directed it) and ''Film/{{Equilibrium}}''. There's even some references to {{Transhumanism}}, in the form of the tech that is in Hae Joo Chang and The Archivist's skin.

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* ''An Orison of Sonmi 451'' from ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' plays out like a walking tribute to cyberpunk with its themes of consumerism, rebellion and oppressive governments, a [[CrapsaccharineWorld Crapsaccharine Society]] in the form of Nea So Copros, cloning and more. The [[Film/CloudAtlas film version]] takes it one step further, by mixing in references - both visual and theme wise - from other works such as ''Film/BladeRunner'', ''Film/TheMatrix'' (not surprising, considering who co-directed it) and ''Film/{{Equilibrium}}''. There's even some references to {{Transhumanism}}, in the form of the tech that is in Hae Joo Chang and The Archivist's skin.



* ''Series/{{Continuum}}'' is a GrayAndGrayMorality time-travel story where the cyberpunk future is the BadFuture the villains are trying to avert and the heroine is trying to save.

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* ''Series/{{Continuum}}'' is a GrayAndGrayMorality time-travel story where the cyberpunk future is the BadFuture the cybernetically enhanced SuperSoldier villains are trying to avert and the heroine is trying to save.



* ''Film/BladeRunner'' is often ''described'' as a cyberpunk film, but actually lacks most of the defining features of the genre. Computer systems and networks hardly feature, the impact of technology and ubiquitous information on society is not really a major theme, and none of the main characters are the hackers and information-underbelly characters who populate cyberpunk. However most people tend to agree that the film pretty much [[TropeCodifier codified]] the visual style of the cyberpunk future: [[CityNoir polluted, overpopulated, overbuilt]] [[MegaCity mega-cities]] plastered with [[AdvertOverloadedFuture neon signs and video billboards]], [[AlwaysNight where the sun never shines]] even [[CyberpunkWithAChanceOfRain when it isn't raining]].
** Heck, Creator/WilliamGibson, literary father of cyberpunk himself, was ''terrified'' when he saw the movie. Why? [[WordOfGod Man's own words]]:
---> "About ten minutes into ''Blade Runner'', I reeled out of the theater in complete despair over its visual brilliance and its similarity to the "look" of ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'', my [then] largely unwritten first novel. Not only had I been beaten to the semiotic punch, but this damned movie looked better than the images in my head! With time, as I got over that, I started to take a certain delight in the way the film began to affect the way the world looked. Club fashions, at first, then rock videos, finally even architecture. Amazing! A science fiction movie affecting reality!"
** The novel ''Film/BladeRunner'' is based on, ''Literature/DoAndroidsDreamOfElectricSheep'', is one of the major precursors of the cyberpunk genre. A lot of the more cyberpunkish elements were dropped from the movie in favor of focusing on the major plotline, since most of them were only peripherally linked to the actual plot and served more as background material. A lot of the dropped elements also were used in the novel to prove Deckard was human, which contradicts Creator/RidleyScott's interpretation that Deckard was a replicant.
* ''Film/{{Avatar}}'': The inhabitants of the Pandora can connect to a natural/organic version of the internet via neural connection fibers, who are being threatened by a mining corporation.
** Earth in ''Avatar'' is overpopulated and has technology and adverts everywhere, and looks a little like Los Angeles from Film/BladeRunner.

to:

* ''Film/BladeRunner'' is often ''described'' as a cyberpunk film, but actually lacks most of the defining features of the genre. Computer systems and networks hardly feature, the impact of technology and ubiquitous information on society is not really a major theme, and none of the main characters are the hackers and information-underbelly characters who populate cyberpunk. However most people tend to agree that the film pretty much [[TropeCodifier codified]] the visual style of the cyberpunk future: [[CityNoir polluted, overpopulated, overbuilt]] [[MegaCity mega-cities]] plastered with [[AdvertOverloadedFuture neon signs and video billboards]], [[AlwaysNight where the sun never shines]] even [[CyberpunkWithAChanceOfRain when it isn't raining]].
** Heck, Creator/WilliamGibson, literary father of cyberpunk himself,
raining]]. Creator/WilliamGibson himself was ''terrified'' when he saw the movie. Why? [[WordOfGod Man's own words]]:
---> "About ten minutes into ''Blade Runner'', I reeled out of the theater in complete despair over its visual brilliance and its similarity to the "look" of ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'', my [then] largely unwritten first novel. Not only had I been beaten to the semiotic punch, but this damned movie looked better than the images in my head! With time, as I got over that, I started to take a certain delight in the way
alarmed that the film began seemed to affect have beaten the way the world looked. Club fashions, at first, then rock videos, finally even architecture. Amazing! A science fiction movie affecting reality!"
** The novel ''Film/BladeRunner'' is based on, ''Literature/DoAndroidsDreamOfElectricSheep'', is one
aesthetic of the major precursors of the cyberpunk genre. A lot of the more cyberpunkish elements were dropped from the movie in favor of focusing on the major plotline, since most of them were only peripherally linked his seminal work ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' to the actual plot and served more as background material. A lot of the dropped elements also were used in the novel to prove Deckard was human, which contradicts Creator/RidleyScott's interpretation that Deckard was a replicant.
punch.
* ''Film/{{Avatar}}'': The inhabitants of the Pandora can connect to a natural/organic version of the internet via neural connection fibers, who are being threatened by a mining corporation.
**
corporation. Earth in ''Avatar'' is overpopulated and has technology and adverts everywhere, and looks a little like Los Angeles from Film/BladeRunner.''Film/BladeRunner''.



* ''Film/{{Inception}}'': The film's certainly more [[FilmNoir noir]] but the dream-sharing technology (and its illegal uses) are pretty cyber, while the general theme of Corporate Espionage is very punk.
* ''Film/TheMatrix'' arguably takes the whole cyberspace theme to its most extreme conclusion, but perhaps ''too'' extreme to be considered truly CyberPunk, ironically enough. The quasi-religious symbolism and the idealism of the protagonists pretty much disqualify it too.
** ''Film/TheMatrix'' starts out cyberpunk, but then veers into PostCyberPunk after the heroes become accustomed to jacking in and out of the Matrix at will. Note the distinction seems to be that the heroes of ''The Matrix'' are messianic action heroes, with superhuman powers by dint of skill hacking into the Matrix; if they were underpowered rebels fighting a losing battle and Zion turned out to be a [[MindScrew Matrix Within A Matrix]], it would probably be considered CyberPunk.

to:

* ''Film/{{Inception}}'': The film's certainly more [[FilmNoir noir]] but the dream-sharing technology (and its illegal uses) are pretty cyber, while the general theme of Corporate Espionage is very punk.
punk. Also considered PostCyberPunk.
* ''Film/TheMatrix'' arguably takes has freedom fighters and hackers on the whole cyberspace theme to its most extreme conclusion, but perhaps ''too'' extreme to be considered truly CyberPunk, ironically enough. edges of society fighting faceless, suited agents of an overwhelming authority. The quasi-religious symbolism fashions of long black dusters and shades mirror cyberpunk protagonists, and the idealism of the protagonists pretty much disqualify it too.
** ''Film/TheMatrix'' starts out cyberpunk, but then veers into PostCyberPunk after the heroes become accustomed to jacking in and out
washed-out, metropolitan look of the Matrix at will. Note the distinction seems to be that the heroes is also very CyberPunk. The central theme of ''The Matrix'' are messianic action heroes, questioning reality also falls in line with superhuman powers by dint of skill hacking into CyberPunk and notable inspirations to the Matrix; if they were underpowered rebels fighting a losing battle and Zion turned out to be a [[MindScrew Matrix Within A Matrix]], it would probably be considered CyberPunk.genre, such as the works of Creator/PhilipKDick.
23rd Jan '18 5:03:14 PM lakingsif
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As a movement, it was the successor in some sense to the NewWaveScienceFiction movement of the sixties and seventies. Related to PostCyberpunk and UsefulNotes/{{Cybergoth}}. Of course, several works fit on a continuum between the two tropes. See also {{Cyberspace}}, DungeonPunk, PunkPunk. Compare also with SteamPunk, which shares some similarities with cyberpunk. See also NeoAfrica.

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As a movement, it was the successor in some sense to the NewWaveScienceFiction movement of the sixties and seventies. Related to PostCyberpunk and UsefulNotes/{{Cybergoth}}. Of course, several works fit on a continuum between the two tropes. See also {{Cyberspace}}, DungeonPunk, PunkPunk. Compare also with SteamPunk, which shares some similarities with cyberpunk.cyberpunk, and TechnoDystopia, which can have overlap on the futurism side. See also NeoAfrica.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Cyberpunk