History Main / CriticalFailure

22nd Jan '18 10:21:59 AM CybranGeneralSturm
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' from a rare JRPG example; rarely, when going for a regular attack, there is a chance of the character overshooting their attack and stumbling, causing themselves to fall over and either lose their next turn (in ''3'') or be vulnerable to extra damage (in ''4''). In ''3'', ranged weapons wouldn't cause this, giving them a small extra benefit. Of particular note is the animation for [[spoiler:Shinjiro Aragaki]]'s critical failure: rather than tripping or pratfalling like the others, [[spoiler:he falls to their knees in a coughing fit]], one of the clues that [[spoiler:he is secretly dying]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona *''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' from a rare JRPG example; rarely, when going for a regular attack, there is a chance of the character overshooting their attack and stumbling, causing themselves to fall over and either lose their next turn (in ''3'') vanilla ''3'' and FES) or be vulnerable to extra damage (in ''4'').''4'' and [[UpdatedRerelease Persona 3 Portable]]). In ''3'', ranged weapons wouldn't cause this, giving them a small extra benefit. Of particular note is the animation for [[spoiler:Shinjiro Aragaki]]'s critical failure: rather than tripping or pratfalling like the others, [[spoiler:he falls to their his knees in a coughing fit]], one of the clues that [[spoiler:he is secretly dying]].
6th Dec '17 5:15:49 PM nombretomado
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** The Ultrasafe Transporters are the epitome of this, having a high probability of critical failures, including (but not limited to) transporting you [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou a hundred yards in the air]] over your expected arrival point, [[{{Animorphism}} turning you into a chicken or a gnoll]], [[GenderBender changing your sex]] or race, summoning your EvilTwin or setting you on fire. Many engineers use these for the specific thrill of seeing those failures happen. Parodied by [[http://www.darklegacycomics.com/47.html this]] ''DarkLegacyComics'' strip.

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** The Ultrasafe Transporters are the epitome of this, having a high probability of critical failures, including (but not limited to) transporting you [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou a hundred yards in the air]] over your expected arrival point, [[{{Animorphism}} turning you into a chicken or a gnoll]], [[GenderBender changing your sex]] or race, summoning your EvilTwin or setting you on fire. Many engineers use these for the specific thrill of seeing those failures happen. Parodied by [[http://www.darklegacycomics.com/47.html this]] ''DarkLegacyComics'' ''Webcomic/DarkLegacyComics'' strip.
6th Dec '17 9:43:16 AM FuzzyBoots
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* ''TabletopGame/PlanetMercenary'' employs a gentle version of this. Rolling all 1's (a 1 in 216 chance with the standard 3d6 roll) results in failure, but nothing additional bad happening.
8th Nov '17 9:25:28 AM Luigifan
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Just as a CriticalHit gives a character a random chance of doing noticeably increased damage with an attack, a Critical Failure is the precise opposite: A finite, if sometimes [[EverythingTryingToKillYou suspiciously]] [[KillerGameMaster large]], possibility that the attack will fail, be resisted, miss (or even backfire and hurt the attacker), regardless of any stat bonuses, upgrades, tweaks, or special equipment involved.

If being used on everything from swordplay to rock climbing, it may be a game mechanic meant to show the inherent danger in messing about with such dangerous things. Perhaps it's described as the unseen weak chink in the armour or the sudden gust of wind or [[JerkassGods the gods just being dicks]] that day. When used only on particular items or actions, it could be used to show how they are the riskier choice or contain some particular special power that must be paid off for with a special risk (see AwesomeButImpractical.)

The weapon of choice for the KillerGameMaster, the bane of the {{Munchkin}} and the source of mirth for TheLoonie, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''[='=] '''unofficial''' [[HouseRules utilization of it as the roll of a 1 on a D20]][[note]]The actual rules merely have the 1 as auto-fail, and only on certain rolls like attacks and saves.[[/note]] is the [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] and [[TropeMakers Trope Maker]] for many tabletop and video games based on role-playing. However, it has often been a factor in games of luck for much of time. The attempts of Game Masters to explain ''how'' a particular RandomNumberGod-decreed critical failure 'happened' regularly stretch plausibility to make it an EpicFail for the character responsible.

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Just as a CriticalHit gives a character a random chance of doing noticeably increased damage with an attack, a Critical Failure is the precise opposite: A finite, if sometimes [[EverythingTryingToKillYou suspiciously]] [[KillerGameMaster large]], possibility that the attack will fail, be resisted, miss (or miss, or even [[AttackBackfire backfire and hurt the attacker), attacker]], regardless of any stat bonuses, upgrades, tweaks, or special equipment involved.

If being used on everything from swordplay to rock climbing, it may be a game mechanic meant to show the inherent danger in messing about with such dangerous things. Perhaps it's described as the unseen weak chink in the armour or the sudden gust of wind or [[JerkassGods the gods just being dicks]] that day. When used only on particular items or actions, it could be used to show how they are the riskier choice or contain some particular special power that must be paid off for with a special risk (see AwesomeButImpractical.)

AwesomeButImpractical).

The weapon of choice for the KillerGameMaster, the bane of the {{Munchkin}} {{Munchkin}}, and the source of mirth for TheLoonie, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''[='=] '''unofficial''' [[HouseRules utilization of it as the roll of a 1 on a D20]][[note]]The D20]][[note]]the actual rules merely have the 1 as auto-fail, and only on certain rolls like attacks and saves.[[/note]] saves (as a side note, those same rolls are also the only ones for which a natural 20 is an automatic success)[[/note]] is the [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] and [[TropeMakers Trope Maker]] for many tabletop and video games based on role-playing. However, it has often been a factor in games of luck for much of time. The attempts of Game Masters to explain ''how'' a particular RandomNumberGod-decreed critical failure 'happened' regularly stretch plausibility to make it an EpicFail for the character responsible.



MagicMisfire is one possible consequence or subtype. See also LuckStat. Can sometimes result in a CriticalExistenceFailure but the tropes are not directly related. Compare RandomizedDamageAttack when a particular attack can deal a widespread random amount of damage which may encompass very low damage so as to be called a "critical failure". Contrast CriticalHit.

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MagicMisfire is one possible consequence or subtype. See also LuckStat. Can sometimes result in a CriticalExistenceFailure CriticalExistenceFailure, but the tropes are not directly related. Compare RandomizedDamageAttack when a particular attack can deal a widespread random amount of damage damage, which may encompass very [[ScratchDamage such embarrassingly low damage damage]] so as to be called a "critical failure". Contrast CriticalHit.



"Critical Miss" redirects here. Click here for the webcomic ''Webcomic/CriticalMiss'' and here for ''WebComic/ParadoxSpace'' comic.

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"Critical Miss" redirects here. Click here [[WebComic/CriticalMiss here]] for the webcomic ''Webcomic/CriticalMiss'' and here [[WebComic/ParadoxSpace here]] for the ''WebComic/ParadoxSpace'' comic.



-->'''Leo:''' ''[in shock]'' [[QuirkyBard Bards suck]].\\

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-->'''Leo:''' ''[in shock]'' [[QuirkyBard Bards suck]].\\suck.]]\\



** Despite the strong possibility that ''D&D'' is the TropeMaker, critical failures have ''never'' been more than an optional rule... but thousands of tables have added them to their HouseRules. The ''official'' rule for rolling a 1 on d20 varies by edition and the type of roll, but generally a 1 is either calculated normally, or at worst the natural 1 is just an automatic miss with no additional effects. There have been extensive flame wars, all the way back to the days when they had to be conducted by letter column, debating whether critical failures deserve a place in the game.

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** Despite the strong possibility that ''D&D'' is the TropeMaker, critical failures have ''never'' been more than an optional rule... but thousands of tables have added them to their HouseRules. The ''official'' rule for rolling a 1 on d20 varies by edition and the type of roll, but generally a 1 is either calculated normally, or at worst the natural 1 is just an automatic miss with no additional effects. There have been extensive flame wars, {{flame war}}s, all the way back to the days when they had to be conducted by letter column, debating whether critical failures deserve a place in the game.



** In 2nd edition there were semi-official optional rules for critical hits and misses published by Dragon magazine, where you would roll a percent and in general, the higher the number the more potent the effect. The funny thing is, both critical hits and critical failures used the same table -- so it was entirely possible to decapitate yourself on a critical failure if you rolled exceptionally high on the table.
** In the third edition (and variants), automatic failure on a roll of 1 apply only to attack rolls. Skill checks ''do not'' result in an automatic failure when rolling a 1, nor an automatic success when rolling a 20 -- making it impossible for most people to (say) balance on a single cobweb, but also preventing them from garroting themselves while tying their shoes.

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** In 2nd edition edition, there were semi-official optional rules for critical hits and misses published by Dragon magazine, where you would roll a percent and in general, the higher the number the more potent the effect. The funny thing is, both critical hits and critical failures used the same table -- so it was entirely possible to decapitate yourself on a critical failure if you rolled exceptionally high on the table.
** In the third edition (and variants), automatic failure on a roll of 1 apply applies only to attack rolls.rolls and saving throws. Skill checks ''do not'' result in an automatic failure when rolling a 1, nor an automatic success when rolling a 20 -- making it impossible for most people to (say) balance on a single cobweb, but also preventing them from garroting themselves while tying their shoes.
20th Sep '17 1:37:21 AM Medinoc
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The weapon of choice for the KillerGameMaster, the bane of the {{Munchkin}} and the source of mirth for TheLoonie, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''' '''unofficial''' [[HouseRules utilization of it as the roll of a 1 on a D20]][[note]]The actual rules merely have the 1 as auto-fail, and only on certain rolls like attacks and saves.[[/note]] is the [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] and [[TropeMakers Trope Maker]] for many tabletop and video games based on role-playing. However, it has often been a factor in games of luck for much of time. The attempts of Game Masters to explain ''how'' a particular RandomNumberGod-decreed critical failure 'happened' regularly stretch plausibility to make it an EpicFail for the character responsible.

to:

The weapon of choice for the KillerGameMaster, the bane of the {{Munchkin}} and the source of mirth for TheLoonie, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''[='=] '''unofficial''' [[HouseRules utilization of it as the roll of a 1 on a D20]][[note]]The actual rules merely have the 1 as auto-fail, and only on certain rolls like attacks and saves.[[/note]] is the [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] and [[TropeMakers Trope Maker]] for many tabletop and video games based on role-playing. However, it has often been a factor in games of luck for much of time. The attempts of Game Masters to explain ''how'' a particular RandomNumberGod-decreed critical failure 'happened' regularly stretch plausibility to make it an EpicFail for the character responsible.
20th Sep '17 1:37:05 AM Medinoc
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The weapon of choice for the KillerGameMaster, the bane of the {{Munchkin}} and the source of mirth for TheLoonie, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''' unofficial utilization of it as the roll of a 1 on a D20 is the [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] and [[TropeMakers Trope Maker]] for many tabletop and video games based on role-playing. However, it has often been a factor in games of luck for much of time. The attempts of Game Masters to explain ''how'' a particular RandomNumberGod-decreed critical failure 'happened' regularly stretch plausibility to make it an EpicFail for the character responsible.

to:

The weapon of choice for the KillerGameMaster, the bane of the {{Munchkin}} and the source of mirth for TheLoonie, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''' unofficial '''unofficial''' [[HouseRules utilization of it as the roll of a 1 on a D20 D20]][[note]]The actual rules merely have the 1 as auto-fail, and only on certain rolls like attacks and saves.[[/note]] is the [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] and [[TropeMakers Trope Maker]] for many tabletop and video games based on role-playing. However, it has often been a factor in games of luck for much of time. The attempts of Game Masters to explain ''how'' a particular RandomNumberGod-decreed critical failure 'happened' regularly stretch plausibility to make it an EpicFail for the character responsible.
20th Aug '17 6:05:18 PM thatother1dude
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*** In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'', since ''VATS'' no longer freezes the action, certain enemies can cancel out critical strikes.

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*** In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'', since ''VATS'' no longer freezes the action, certain enemies can cancel out critical strikes. On the other side, the perk with the highest Luck requirement, Ricochet, gives enemy attack's a small chance of bouncing back at them for a OneHitKill.
15th Aug '17 3:45:52 PM lalalei2001
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* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', rolling a 95 or above will make your monster attack itself.

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* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', ''VideoGame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', rolling a 95 or above will make your monster attack itself.
14th Aug '17 8:02:53 PM kome360
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* ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'': It is entirely possible (with a few minor debuffs) to run up to an enemy, point a shotgun directly at the back of his head, and MISS. In the sequel, there is a tiny possibility that grenades and rockets will be misfired, causing their trajectory to move a few tiles away from a maximized-efficiency target area.
26th Jul '17 7:47:18 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* In ''Webcomic/EightBitTheater'', Black Mage makes an attempt (well, one of many) to kill his allies by [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2004/06/15/episode-429-several-birds-one-hadoken/ blowing up a volcano they're standing next to]]. Too bad [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2004/06/17/episode-430-very-long-range/ he misses completely]]. Yes, he misses [[EpicFail a friggin']] ''[[EpicFail mountain]]''. Lampshaded by the GenreSavvy Red Mage in the latter comic.

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* In ''Webcomic/EightBitTheater'', Black Mage makes an attempt (well, one of many) to kill his allies by [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2004/06/15/episode-429-several-birds-one-hadoken/ blowing up a volcano they're standing next to]]. Too bad [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2004/06/17/episode-430-very-long-range/ he misses completely]]. Yes, he misses [[EpicFail a friggin']] ''[[EpicFail mountain]]''. Lampshaded by the GenreSavvy Red Mage in the latter comic.
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