History Main / CriticalBacklash

20th Jan '17 3:00:19 PM HighCrate
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** It's also a case of DoubleStandard, many people feel free to mock classic '70s disco hits but yet some acclaimed current artists still draw inspiration from the genre, Random Access Memories by ''Music/DaftPunk'' was a success of both critics and public and is a love letter to disco.
13th Jan '17 1:44:58 PM DustSnitch
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So there's a show that everybody hates. The critics tear strips off it, your friends swear it sucks, and even the ''[[OurProductSucks advertising]]'' seems to agree. So one night you happen to come across it and, as you see it, it's not that bad. It might not by any stretch of the imagination be ''perfect'' -- the star is a LargeHam, the hero's daughter is a whiny brat, and the [[NoodleIncident walrus scene]] doesn't work -- but it's nowhere near the disaster that everyone says it is. What's going on?

You've just experienced a [[TitleDrop critical backlash]].
7th Jan '17 4:48:18 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Wrestling/HulkHogan is also criticized for his lack of actual wrestling ability and for being formulaic much like Cena above. Hogan was trained by legendary Japanese technician Hiro Matsuda, but American promoters thought that the American wrestling fans wouldn't buy a guy the size of Hogan wrestling that way and pushed him to wrestle like a generic big guy heel, with his offense consisting mostly of strikes, dirty moves and a few power moves. His ability became even more "limited" when he became the top face of the WWF in the mid-1980s, since his matches always consisted of Hogan getting the crap kicked out of him, only for Hogan to get a second wind, perform the FiveMovesOfDoom and win. Hogan brought back some of his techincal style when he [[FaceHeelTurn became Hollywood Hogan]] in 1996, even putting on a decent technical match against Wrestling/BretHart in 1998 (though age and injuries had slowed him down considerably). Watching Hogan's Japanese matches compared to his American ones would almost make you think it was two different people. He even busted out an ''enzugiri'' in one of his Japanese matches. Considering that Hogan is the most famous pro wrestler ever and has been a household name to both fans and non-fans alike for over 30 years, he must have had ''some'' talent. Though Ole Anderson disputes that it was the fault of bookers, saying he got rid of Hogan specifically because Hogan showed him nothing other than his size.

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* Wrestling/HulkHogan is also criticized for his lack of actual wrestling ability and for being formulaic much like Cena above. Hogan was trained by legendary Japanese technician Hiro Matsuda, but American promoters thought that the American wrestling fans wouldn't buy a guy the size of Hogan wrestling that way and pushed him to wrestle like a generic big guy heel, with his offense consisting mostly of strikes, dirty moves and a few power moves. His ability became even more "limited" when he became the top face of the WWF in the mid-1980s, since his matches always consisted of Hogan getting the crap kicked out of him, only for Hogan to get a second wind, perform the FiveMovesOfDoom and win. Hogan brought back some of his techincal style when he [[FaceHeelTurn became Hollywood Hogan]] in 1996, even putting on a decent technical match against Wrestling/BretHart in 1998 (though age and injuries had slowed him down considerably). Watching Hogan's Japanese matches compared to his American ones would almost make you think it was two different people. He even busted out an ''enzugiri'' in one of his Japanese matches. Considering that Hogan is the most famous pro wrestler ever and has been a household name to both fans and non-fans alike for over 30 years, he must have had ''some'' talent. Though Ole Anderson disputes that it was the fault of bookers, promoters, saying he got rid of Hogan specifically because Hogan showed him nothing other than his size.
7th Jan '17 4:43:49 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Wrestling/HulkHogan is also criticized for his lack of actual wrestling ability and for being formulaic much like Cena above. Hogan was trained by legendary Japanese technician Hiro Matsuda, but American promoters thought that the American wrestling fans wouldn't buy a guy the size of Hogan wrestling that way and pushed him to wrestle like a generic big guy heel, with his offense consisting mostly of strikes, dirty moves and a few power moves. His ability became even more "limited" when he became the top face of the WWF in the mid-1980s, since his matches always consisted of Hogan getting the crap kicked out of him, only for Hogan to get a second wind, perform the FiveMovesOfDoom and win. Hogan brought back some of his techincal style when he [[FaceHeelTurn became Hollywood Hogan]] in 1996, even putting on a decent technical match against Wrestling/BretHart in 1998 (though age and injuries had slowed him down considerably). Watching Hogan's Japanese matches compared to his American ones would almost make you think it was two different people. He even busted out an ''enzugiri'' in one of his Japanese matches. Considering that Hogan is the most famous pro wrestler ever and has been a household name to both fans and non-fans alike for over 30 years, he must have had ''some'' talent.
* Wrestling/{{Goldberg}} has a reputation among hardcore fans for being limited and a dangerous worker because he accidentally delivering a legit superkick to Wrestling/BretHart, giving Hart a concussion which lead to Hart retiring due to Post-Concussion Syndrome. While Goldberg wasn't very technically sound and he was a bit sloppy, he at least tried to bust out new moves in his matches and while they weren't textbook perfect, they look effective enough. Let's be honest, the Spear and Jackhammer were all he needed, because fans loved him for it.

to:

* Wrestling/HulkHogan is also criticized for his lack of actual wrestling ability and for being formulaic much like Cena above. Hogan was trained by legendary Japanese technician Hiro Matsuda, but American promoters thought that the American wrestling fans wouldn't buy a guy the size of Hogan wrestling that way and pushed him to wrestle like a generic big guy heel, with his offense consisting mostly of strikes, dirty moves and a few power moves. His ability became even more "limited" when he became the top face of the WWF in the mid-1980s, since his matches always consisted of Hogan getting the crap kicked out of him, only for Hogan to get a second wind, perform the FiveMovesOfDoom and win. Hogan brought back some of his techincal style when he [[FaceHeelTurn became Hollywood Hogan]] in 1996, even putting on a decent technical match against Wrestling/BretHart in 1998 (though age and injuries had slowed him down considerably). Watching Hogan's Japanese matches compared to his American ones would almost make you think it was two different people. He even busted out an ''enzugiri'' in one of his Japanese matches. Considering that Hogan is the most famous pro wrestler ever and has been a household name to both fans and non-fans alike for over 30 years, he must have had ''some'' talent.
talent. Though Ole Anderson disputes that it was the fault of bookers, saying he got rid of Hogan specifically because Hogan showed him nothing other than his size.
* Wrestling/{{Goldberg}} has a reputation among hardcore fans for being limited and a dangerous worker because he accidentally delivering a legit superkick mule kick to Wrestling/BretHart, giving Hart a concussion which lead to Hart retiring due to Post-Concussion Syndrome. While Goldberg wasn't very technically sound and he was a bit sloppy, he at least tried to bust out new moves in his matches and while they weren't textbook perfect, they look effective enough. Let's be honest, the Spear and Jackhammer were all he needed, because fans loved him for it.
5th Jan '17 1:14:59 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Completing the NES trifecta is ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'', whose departure from the level-based structure of parts I and III is still complained about today, along with its rather obtuse puzzles and several flat-out misleading clues. Those who grew up with the title tend to be more charitable in their assessment, appreciating the game for its attempt at an open-world action/adventure style (which became the series bellwether once ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' ironed out the kinks) and pointing out that plenty of other well-regarded games from the era had their fair share of GuideDangIt moments.

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* Completing the NES trifecta is ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'', whose departure from the level-based structure of parts I and III is still complained about today, along with its rather obtuse puzzles and several flat-out misleading clues. Those who grew up with the title or tried it in spite of contemporary internet critics' snarking tend to be more charitable in their assessment, appreciating the game for its attempt at an open-world action/adventure style (which became the series bellwether once ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' ironed out the kinks) and pointing out that plenty of other well-regarded games from the era had their fair share of GuideDangIt moments.
4th Jan '17 10:16:21 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* In a similar situation to ''Zelda II'', the western ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' is often derided for being a DolledUpInstallment of ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic'', odd mechanics and not being as much memorable than its [[SophomoreSlump predecessor and successor]]. This installment was also released in Japan under the title ''Super Mario Bros. USA'' and made it on Famitsu's [[http://blog.hardcoregaming101.net/2012/02/top-100-famicom-games-as-voted-by.html Top 100 Famicom games]] at #45 all the while ''Dokey Dokey Panic'' was absent. It doesn't help that ''Doki Doki Panic'' itself [[MerchandiseDriven was meant as a commercial for Fuji Television]].

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* In a similar situation to ''Zelda II'', the western ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' is often derided for being a DolledUpInstallment of ''VideoGame/DokiDokiPanic'', odd mechanics and not being as much memorable than its [[SophomoreSlump predecessor and successor]]. This installment was also released in Japan under the title ''Super Mario Bros. USA'' and made it on Famitsu's [[http://blog.hardcoregaming101.net/2012/02/top-100-famicom-games-as-voted-by.html Top 100 Famicom games]] at #45 all the while ''Dokey Dokey ''Doki Doki Panic'' was absent.absent (What's more, Creator/ShigeruMiyamoto himself surprised many by revealing it to be among his favorites). It doesn't help that ''Doki Doki Panic'' itself [[MerchandiseDriven was meant as a commercial for Fuji Television]].


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* Completing the NES trifecta is ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'', whose departure from the level-based structure of parts I and III is still complained about today, along with its rather obtuse puzzles and several flat-out misleading clues. Those who grew up with the title tend to be more charitable in their assessment, appreciating the game for its attempt at an open-world action/adventure style (which became the series bellwether once ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' ironed out the kinks) and pointing out that plenty of other well-regarded games from the era had their fair share of GuideDangIt moments.
4th Jan '17 10:00:57 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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** [[TheScrappy Jar-Jar Binks]]. Yes, he's annoying and unfunny. Yes, he can distract from the plot at times and yes he could be seen as a [[EthnicScrappy racist characterization of Jamaicans]] but he's not unbearable to watch and actually can be useful at times ([[spoiler:if it weren't for him, the Naboo government and the Gungan army wouldn't have joined forces and the Federation would have won]]). With the amount of hatred he receives, one would think the character came to life, fucked everyone's mothers and killed their fathers afterwards. Tellingly, [[WebVideo/RedLetterMedia Mr. Plinkett]]'s review spends over ''90 minutes'' discussing the movie's flaws and barely has to mention Jar-Jar at all, making the unspoken point that Jar-Jar isn't a great asset, but it's unfair to blame him for ruining the film when there are plenty of other things wrong with the writing, acting, story and direction.

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** [[TheScrappy Jar-Jar Binks]]. Yes, he's annoying and unfunny. Yes, he can distract from the plot at times and yes he could be seen as a [[EthnicScrappy racist characterization of Jamaicans]] but he's not unbearable to watch and actually can be useful at times ([[spoiler:if it weren't for him, the Naboo government and the Gungan army wouldn't have joined forces and the Federation would have won]]). With the amount of hatred he receives, one would think the character came to life, fucked everyone's mothers and killed their fathers afterwards. Tellingly, [[WebVideo/RedLetterMedia Mr. Plinkett]]'s review spends over ''90 minutes'' discussing the movie's flaws and barely has to mention Jar-Jar at all, making the unspoken point that Jar-Jar isn't a is no great asset, but it's unfair to blame him for ruining the film when there are plenty of other things wrong with the writing, acting, story and direction.
30th Dec '16 10:04:29 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/{{Doom}}'', not the game, but [[VideoGameMoviesSuck the movie]]. It may not be accurate to the game, but does that really matter? The biggest problem [[DwayneJohnson The Rock]] leaves a LampshadeHanging on. Otherwise, it's fine.

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* ''Film/{{Doom}}'', not the game, but [[VideoGameMoviesSuck the movie]]. It may not be accurate to the game, but does that really matter? The biggest problem [[DwayneJohnson The Rock]] Wrestling/TheRock leaves a LampshadeHanging on. Otherwise, it's fine.
28th Dec '16 12:30:53 PM Sakubara
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* ''Anime/MDGeist'' has been so often called 'the worst anime ever' that when a lot of people actually ''watched'' it when it aired on [[Creator/{{Syfy}} Sci-Fi Channel]], for many of them it failed to be as bad as claimed and [[VindicatedByCable it's gained something of a fanbase]] largely for the designs of the mech, its [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome soundtrack]], and generally avoiding anything 'cute'.

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* ''Anime/MDGeist'' has been so often called 'the worst anime ever' that when a lot of people actually ''watched'' it when it aired on [[Creator/{{Syfy}} Sci-Fi Channel]], for many of them it failed to be as bad as claimed and [[VindicatedByCable it's gained something of a fanbase]] largely for the designs of the mech, its [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome soundtrack]], and generally avoiding anything 'cute'.'[[{{Moe}} cute]]'.
27th Dec '16 9:23:21 AM thecarolinabull01
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* Wrestling/HulkHogan is also criticized for his lack of actual wrestling ability and for being formulaic much like Cena above. Hogan was trained by legendary Japanese technician Hiro Matsuda, but American promoters thought that the American wrestling fans wouldn't buy a guy the size of Hogan wrestling that way and pushed him to wrestle like a generic big guy heel, with his offense consisting mostly of strikes, dirty moves and a few power moves. His ability became even more "limited" when he became the top face of the WWF in the mid-1980s, since his matches always consisted of Hogan getting the crap kicked out of him, only for Hogan to get a second wind, perform the FiveMovesOfDoom and win. Hogan brought back some of his techincal style when he [[FaceHeelTurn became Hollywood Hogan]] in 1996, even putting on a decent technical match against Wrestling/BretHart in 1998. Watching Hogan's Japanese matches compared to his American ones would almost make you think it was two different people. He even busted out an ''enzugiri'' in one of his Japanese matches. Considering that Hogan is the most famous pro wrestler ever and has been a household name to both fans and non-fans alike for over 30 years, he must have had ''some'' talent.

to:

* Wrestling/HulkHogan is also criticized for his lack of actual wrestling ability and for being formulaic much like Cena above. Hogan was trained by legendary Japanese technician Hiro Matsuda, but American promoters thought that the American wrestling fans wouldn't buy a guy the size of Hogan wrestling that way and pushed him to wrestle like a generic big guy heel, with his offense consisting mostly of strikes, dirty moves and a few power moves. His ability became even more "limited" when he became the top face of the WWF in the mid-1980s, since his matches always consisted of Hogan getting the crap kicked out of him, only for Hogan to get a second wind, perform the FiveMovesOfDoom and win. Hogan brought back some of his techincal style when he [[FaceHeelTurn became Hollywood Hogan]] in 1996, even putting on a decent technical match against Wrestling/BretHart in 1998.1998 (though age and injuries had slowed him down considerably). Watching Hogan's Japanese matches compared to his American ones would almost make you think it was two different people. He even busted out an ''enzugiri'' in one of his Japanese matches. Considering that Hogan is the most famous pro wrestler ever and has been a household name to both fans and non-fans alike for over 30 years, he must have had ''some'' talent.
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