History Main / CreditsPushback

11th Jun '16 6:51:13 PM nombretomado
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*** ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/ICarly'' often have credits which include a video intended to draw viewers to the tie-in site. It's a crapshoot if it actually manages to get shown without being squashed or overdubbed, especially outside the US. Fortunately, airings of the two shows on TeenNick retain the original ending credits, averting the trope...until at some point, it was replaced with TeenNick's own split-screen/bottom-third credits.

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*** ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/ICarly'' often have credits which include a video intended to draw viewers to the tie-in site. It's a crapshoot if it actually manages to get shown without being squashed or overdubbed, especially outside the US. Fortunately, airings of the two shows on TeenNick Creator/TeenNick retain the original ending credits, averting the trope...until at some point, it was replaced with TeenNick's [=TeenNick=]'s own split-screen/bottom-third credits.
13th May '16 11:50:59 AM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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Also referred to as "Credit Squeeze" (Charlie Brooker often uses this term) or "Credit Crunch" (after the term for the current Global Recession).

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Also referred to as "Credit Squeeze" (Charlie Brooker often uses this term) or "Credit Crunch" (after the term for the current 2008 Global Recession).
10th May '16 6:16:21 AM MattBoo
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** A rather interesting MTV example is when they briefly put ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' back on the roster in January/February 2016. Instead of using the regular MTV split-screen credits, they used the Nickelodeon split-screen credits that was used for the 2009 rebrand, and instead of having an MTV promo air during the credits, they used a 30 second bit of [=SpongeBob=] and Patrick confusedly watching the credits scroll by. And then afterwards, they used the Nickeelodeon logo after the United Plankton Pictures logo.

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** A rather interesting MTV example is when they briefly put ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' back on the roster in January/February 2016. Instead of using the regular MTV split-screen credits, they used the Nickelodeon split-screen credits that was used for the 2009 rebrand, and instead of having an MTV promo air during the credits, they used a 30 second bit of [=SpongeBob=] and Patrick confusedly watching the credits scroll by. And then afterwards, they used the Nickeelodeon Nickelodeon logo after the United Plankton Pictures logo.logo. Basically the whole thing (sans the [=SpongeBob=] and Patrick bit) makes it seem like you were regularly watching it on Nickelodeon, not on MTV.
10th May '16 6:09:26 AM MattBoo
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Added DiffLines:

** However, this is averted with some of the older Nicktoons (like ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow'', ''WesternAnimation/AaahhRealMonsters'', and ''WesternAnimation/KaBlam''), which don't use split-screen credits at all, even on The Splat (probably due to the shows already being off the air by the time Nick began using split-screen credits).


Added DiffLines:

** A rather interesting MTV example is when they briefly put ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' back on the roster in January/February 2016. Instead of using the regular MTV split-screen credits, they used the Nickelodeon split-screen credits that was used for the 2009 rebrand, and instead of having an MTV promo air during the credits, they used a 30 second bit of [=SpongeBob=] and Patrick confusedly watching the credits scroll by. And then afterwards, they used the Nickeelodeon logo after the United Plankton Pictures logo.
*** And what's more interesting is that rather than using the credits from the episode they had just aired (they only aired season 4 episodes during this time, but that's neither here nor there) they used the credits from the first episode of the show ("Help Wanted/Reef Blower/Tea at the Treedome"). This is somewhat justified, since MTV isn't [=SpongeBob's=] main channel and they haven't aired the show since 2008, so they couldn't possibly have every single episode encoded in their credits.
1st May '16 5:00:47 PM TVRulezAgain
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*** ''{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/ICarly'' often have credits which include a video intended to draw viewers to the tie-in site. It's a crapshoot if it actually manages to get shown without being squashed or overdubbed, especially outside the US. Fortunately, airings of the two shows on TeenNick retain the original ending credits, averting the trope...until at some point, it was replaced with TeenNick's own split-screen/bottom-third credits.

to:

*** ''{{Victorious}}'' ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' and ''Series/ICarly'' often have credits which include a video intended to draw viewers to the tie-in site. It's a crapshoot if it actually manages to get shown without being squashed or overdubbed, especially outside the US. Fortunately, airings of the two shows on TeenNick retain the original ending credits, averting the trope...until at some point, it was replaced with TeenNick's own split-screen/bottom-third credits.
26th Apr '16 3:38:43 AM Andyroid
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* Parodied on ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'', in the Strong Bad Email [[http://www.homestarrunner.com/sbemail155.html theme song]], over the fake credits. As Strong Bad says, "And on the off-chance that you actually wanted to hear the theme song... we've taken care of that, too", it happens again "for real" at the end of the email.

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* Parodied on ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'', in the Strong Bad Email WebAnimation/StrongBadEmail [[http://www.homestarrunner.com/sbemail155.html theme song]], over the fake credits.song]]. As Strong Bad says, "And on the off-chance that you actually wanted to hear the theme song... we've taken care of that, too", it this happens to the fake credits for "The Strong Bad Email Show". It happens again "for real" at the end of the email.
-->Coming up next on ''Powered by the Cheat'', Strong Mad gets his own talk show, and [[HilarityEnsues his next guest is Hilarity!]]



-->'''Lemming Snicket''': Nothing sad ever happens in credits. Though they get squished back, which is sad for the creators, but fine for everyone else

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-->'''Lemming Snicket''': Nothing sad ever happens in credits. Though they get squished back, which is sad for the creators, but fine for everyone elseelse.
10th Apr '16 11:36:32 AM arnoldmcguire335
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* Just like the Disney Channel examples above, they don't do this to their original shows, but boy did they do this trope when they started airing newer imports like''Series/MakoMermaidsAnH2OAdventure'' and ''Series/{{Backstage}}'' in the US. For some reason, ''Series/MyBabysittersAVampire'' got spared though when it aired in the past, but it might change if reaired again today.

to:

* Just like the Disney Channel examples above, they don't do this to their original shows, but boy did they do this trope when they started airing newer imports like''Series/MakoMermaidsAnH2OAdventure'' like ''Series/MakoMermaidsAnH2OAdventure'' and ''Series/{{Backstage}}'' in the US. For some reason, ''Series/MyBabysittersAVampire'' got spared though when it aired in the past, but it might change if reaired again today.
10th Apr '16 11:35:33 AM arnoldmcguire335
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The ad shown in the rest of the screen is ''always'' a promo for the station or a particular program on the station, often with innuendo and double-entendre humor (i.e., never "stay tuned for (name of show)," sometimes with a mundane-by-comparison-but-still-perhaps-humorous plot that was common in the old days), and never for something that would actually give the station money. An interesting thing, however, is that on networks that do this, this is generally the ''only'' advertisement shown between one show and the next; once the pushed credits are over, the next show immediately starts, greatly reducing the amount of time a viewer isn't "attached" to a show and likely to turn the station. On those that don't do this, the very same advertisement appears a few seconds later. On some networks, the credits are pushed back for the start of the next program, to prevent channel switching (this is particularly common if the next program happens to be another episode of the program just ending).

to:

The ad shown in the rest of the screen is ''always'' a promo for the station or a particular program on the station, often with innuendo and double-entendre humor (i.e., never "stay tuned for (name of show)," sometimes with a mundane-by-comparison-but-still-perhaps-humorous plot that was common in the old days), and never for something that would actually give the station money. An interesting thing, however, is that on networks that do this, this is generally the ''only'' advertisement shown between one show and the next; once the pushed credits are over, the next show immediately starts, greatly reducing the amount of time a viewer isn't "attached" to a show and likely to turn the station. On those that don't do this, the very same advertisement appears a few seconds later. On some networks, the credits are pushed back for the start of the next program, to prevent channel switching (this is particularly common if the next program happens to be another episode of the program just ending).
ending). A variation of this happen if a channel happens to air movies (like FX, TNT or Freeform): The beginning of the next movie/TV show plays while the movie's end credits are pushed back.



* Creator/ABCFamily is a huge offender when they air shows which aren't made for the channel. If your name's not ''[[Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager Secret Life]]'', ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', or any other ABC Family original show, all you'll get is a VanityPlate 1st, then this. It didn't take long for the trope to also apply to original programming as well. They still continue this practice as Freeform.

to:

* Creator/ABCFamily is a huge offender when they air shows which aren't made for the channel. If your name's not ''[[Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager Secret Life]]'', ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'', ''Series/MakeItOrBreakIt'', or any other ABC Family original show, all you'll get is a VanityPlate 1st, then this. It didn't take long for the trope to also apply to original programming as well. They well, and still continue this practice as Freeform.



* Just like the Disney Channel examples above, they don't do this to their original shows, but boy did they do this trope when they started airing ''Series/MakoMermaidsAnH2OAdventure'' in the US. For some reason, ''Series/MyBabysittersAVampire'' got spared though when it aired in the past, despite being a fellow import like ''Mako''...

to:

* Just like the Disney Channel examples above, they don't do this to their original shows, but boy did they do this trope when they started airing ''Series/MakoMermaidsAnH2OAdventure'' newer imports like''Series/MakoMermaidsAnH2OAdventure'' and ''Series/{{Backstage}}'' in the US. For some reason, ''Series/MyBabysittersAVampire'' got spared though when it aired in the past, despite being a fellow import like ''Mako''...but it might change if reaired again today.
9th Apr '16 5:08:23 PM skidoo23
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Very popular in the late 1990s and early 2000s, it seems to have lessened recently with new programs, due to the fact that modern end-credits have been reduced to, basically, a VanityPlate, perhaps in response to this trend. Channels which mostly show repeats of older shows, however, have this in spades. It's vaguely rude to the creators of the show whose names are obscured.

The ad shown in the rest of the screen is ''always'' a promo for the station or a particular program on the station, often with innuendo and double-entendre humor (i.e., never "stay tuned for (name of show)," sometimes with a mundane-by-comparison-but-still-perhaps-humorous plot that was common in the old days), and never for something that would actually give the station money. An interesting thing, however, is that on networks that do this, this is generally the ''only'' advertisement shown between one show and the next; once the pushed credits are over, the next show immediately starts, greatly reducing the amount of time a viewer isn't "attached" to a show and likely to turn the station. On those that don't do this, the very same advertisement appears a few seconds later. On some networks, the credits are pushed back for the start of the next episode.

to:

Very popular in the late 1990s and early 2000s, it seems to have lessened recently with new programs, due to the fact that modern end-credits have been reduced to, basically, a VanityPlate, perhaps in response to this trend. Channels which mostly show repeats of older shows, however, have this in spades. It's vaguely rude to the creators of the show whose names are obscured.

obscured, though in the Internet age if anyone is interested in finding out who the Second Assistant Director was or who played "Pretty Older Women" these days, the feeling is they can just Google it.

The ad shown in the rest of the screen is ''always'' a promo for the station or a particular program on the station, often with innuendo and double-entendre humor (i.e., never "stay tuned for (name of show)," sometimes with a mundane-by-comparison-but-still-perhaps-humorous plot that was common in the old days), and never for something that would actually give the station money. An interesting thing, however, is that on networks that do this, this is generally the ''only'' advertisement shown between one show and the next; once the pushed credits are over, the next show immediately starts, greatly reducing the amount of time a viewer isn't "attached" to a show and likely to turn the station. On those that don't do this, the very same advertisement appears a few seconds later. On some networks, the credits are pushed back for the start of the next episode.
program, to prevent channel switching (this is particularly common if the next program happens to be another episode of the program just ending).

In some cases, the studio doesn't play an ad, but instead runs a preview of the upcoming evening news, especially if the show just ending immediately precedes the news.



There are two common versions of this: the broadcaster will simply squish the credits to the side, or the bottom of the screen, run a promo alongside them, and maybe give them back the whole screen by the time the {{Vanity Plate}}s (considered by broadcasters the most important part of the credits) appear. Some networks, however, show the plates first, then cut to a specially designed display with the credits on them.

to:

There are two common versions of this: the broadcaster will simply squish the credits to the side, or the bottom of the screen, run a promo alongside them, and maybe give them back the whole screen by the time the {{Vanity Plate}}s (considered by broadcasters the most important part of the credits) appear. Some networks, however, show the plates first, then cut to a specially designed display with the credits on them.
them. In the case of shows with long credit lists, such as movies, it's common for the closing credits to zip by at light speed.
9th Apr '16 11:41:04 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Channel Seven in Australia are really terrible; not only do they squish the credits into the bottom fifth of the screen, they speed up the credits so that they don't have to show them in full screen or something. It's terrible when you want to know who [[HeyItsThatGuy that guy]] was.

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* Channel Seven in Australia are really terrible; not only do they squish the credits into the bottom fifth of the screen, they speed up the credits so that they don't have to show them in full screen or something. It's terrible when you want to know who [[HeyItsThatGuy that guy]] guy was.
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