2 Hours Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History Main / CreatorKiller

21st May '16 3:19:13 AM erforce
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* ''Film/CutthroatIsland'', one of the biggest box office flops of all time, was the final straw for Creator/CarolcoPictures, which went bankrupt a month prior to the film's release due to its lavish overspending on other projects. It also destroyed Geena Davis' career, her then-husband Renny Harlin's respectability as a director, and the careers of pretty much everyone else involved (only the film's [[Music/JohnDebney composer]] and [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer the studio that distributed it]] came out relatively unscathed; co-writer Robert King later had a hit with ''Series/TheGoodWife'' on TV). The flop of this film (as well as that of ''Film/TheLongKissGoodnight'', also starring Davis and directed by Harlin) is widely credited with destroying their marriage, as Harlin had pushed for Davis, then known for comedic roles, to headline the two action-heavy blockbusters. It also [[GenreKiller killed off]] the pirate movie genre [[BackFromTheDead until]] ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' came along, and even now there are no successful pirate movies outside of that franchise.

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* ''Film/CutthroatIsland'', one of the biggest box office flops of all time, was the final straw for Creator/CarolcoPictures, which went bankrupt a month prior to the film's release due to its lavish overspending on other projects. It also destroyed Geena Davis' career, her then-husband Renny Harlin's Creator/RennyHarlin's respectability as a director, and the careers of pretty much everyone else involved (only the film's [[Music/JohnDebney composer]] and [[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer the studio that distributed it]] came out relatively unscathed; co-writer Robert King later had a hit with ''Series/TheGoodWife'' on TV). The flop of this film (as well as that of ''Film/TheLongKissGoodnight'', also starring Davis and directed by Harlin) is widely credited with destroying their marriage, as Harlin had pushed for Davis, then known for comedic roles, to headline the two action-heavy blockbusters. It also [[GenreKiller killed off]] the pirate movie genre [[BackFromTheDead until]] ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' came along, and even now there are no successful pirate movies outside of that franchise.
19th May '16 9:40:20 AM Doug86
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* After the infamous [[ComicBook/TheCloneSaga Clone Saga]], it was decided that the ''Comicbook/{{Spider-Man}}'' titles were to be cancelled and relaunched with new "[[ContinuityReboot number ones]]" alongside a miniseries written and drawn by Creator/JohnByrne that would retell Spider-Man's origin. This reboot was notable in that one writer - Howard Mackie - would be looking after both titles. The reboot was heavily promoted with garnered much anticipation amongst fans and critics, with Mackie claiming that they would "fix" the books and make things "fun" again. But things soured after the reboot where Mackie had Spider-Man face off against lackluster villains, engage in weird plots like facing off against vampires, supernatural villains, an alien-infested senator who was set up as the BigBad of his arc, and - most notably - "killed" Mary Jane Watson. Fan and critical reaction was sour, and soon Mackie's plans were outright scuttled - he was replaced on one of the books by Paul Jenkins, and was given just enough time to wrap up his run and bring back Mary Jane before he was pulled from the title and replaced by Creator/JMichaelStraczynski. Mackie's career never recovered from the debacle. In the decade since then, Mackie rarely worked in comics with his last work being a six-issue mini-series that was to serve as a "reinterpretation" of what was to actually have happened in the initial Clone Saga alongside Tom Defalco.

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* After the infamous [[ComicBook/TheCloneSaga Clone Saga]], it was decided that the ''Comicbook/{{Spider-Man}}'' ''Comicbook/SpiderMan'' titles were to be cancelled and relaunched with new "[[ContinuityReboot number ones]]" alongside a miniseries written and drawn by Creator/JohnByrne that would retell Spider-Man's origin. This reboot was notable in that one writer - Howard Mackie - would be looking after both titles. The reboot was heavily promoted with garnered much anticipation amongst fans and critics, with Mackie claiming that they would "fix" the books and make things "fun" again. But things soured after the reboot where Mackie had Spider-Man face off against lackluster villains, engage in weird plots like facing off against vampires, supernatural villains, an alien-infested senator who was set up as the BigBad of his arc, and - most notably - "killed" Mary Jane Watson. Fan and critical reaction was sour, and soon Mackie's plans were outright scuttled - he was replaced on one of the books by Paul Jenkins, and was given just enough time to wrap up his run and bring back Mary Jane before he was pulled from the title and replaced by Creator/JMichaelStraczynski. Mackie's career never recovered from the debacle. In the decade since then, Mackie rarely worked in comics with his last work being a six-issue mini-series that was to serve as a "reinterpretation" of what was to actually have happened in the initial Clone Saga alongside Tom Defalco.
18th May '16 8:31:38 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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** The critical and commercial flop of ''Film/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio served ties with DreamWorks later that year. 2016's ''The Light Between Oceans'' will likely be the label's last release. The failure might also mark the end for [[Creator/GeorgeLucas George Lucas]]' mainstream ventures as he has no projects lined up for the foreseeable future.

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** The critical and commercial flop of ''Film/StrangeMagic'' was enough justification on Disney's part to give Creator/TouchstonePictures the ax as the studio served ties with DreamWorks later that year.year; the distribution rights were handed back to Universal Pictures in August 2016. 2016's ''The Light Between Oceans'' will likely be the label's last release. The failure might also mark the end for [[Creator/GeorgeLucas George Lucas]]' mainstream ventures as he has no projects lined up for the foreseeable future.
12th May '16 6:01:05 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Can an entire company be killed off by a commercial? If so, Just for Feet certainly fits the bill. In 1999, the fast-growing shoe retailer produced an ad for the UsefulNotes/SuperBowl, which depicted "hunters" in a Humvee in the desert...who turn out to be targeting [[UnfortunateImplications a barefoot Kenyan runner]]. The hunters give the runner a cup of drugged water and then put on him a pair of shoes while he's unconscious. It made their name more noticed, alright...but for all the wrong reasons. The company was massively criticized for its utterly racist undertones, and the failure of the ad put a giant fork in the road. The company filed for bankruptcy the next year before subsequently collapsing.

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* Can an entire company be killed off by a commercial? If so, Just for Feet certainly fits the bill. In 1999, the fast-growing shoe retailer produced an ad for the UsefulNotes/SuperBowl, which depicted "hunters" in a Humvee in the desert...who turn out to be targeting [[UnfortunateImplications a barefoot Kenyan runner]]. The hunters give the runner a cup of drugged water and then put on him a pair of shoes while he's unconscious. It made their name more noticed, alright...but for all the wrong reasons. The company was massively criticized for its the ad's utterly racist undertones, and the its failure of the ad put a giant fork in the road. The company filed for bankruptcy the next year before subsequently collapsing.
12th May '16 5:58:19 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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Added DiffLines:


[[AC:Retail Companies]]
* Can an entire company be killed off by a commercial? If so, Just for Feet certainly fits the bill. In 1999, the fast-growing shoe retailer produced an ad for the UsefulNotes/SuperBowl, which depicted "hunters" in a Humvee in the desert...who turn out to be targeting [[UnfortunateImplications a barefoot Kenyan runner]]. The hunters give the runner a cup of drugged water and then put on him a pair of shoes while he's unconscious. It made their name more noticed, alright...but for all the wrong reasons. The company was massively criticized for its utterly racist undertones, and the failure of the ad put a giant fork in the road. The company filed for bankruptcy the next year before subsequently collapsing.
8th May '16 12:40:05 AM Arivne
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[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* The infamous "FingerpokeOfDoom" event during a 1999 episode of ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' is often cited as the beginning of the end for Wrestling/{{WCW}}[[note]]If it wasn't this, then David Arquette's ill-fated world title run did it for sure[[/note]], but the event that truly sent the promotion to the point of no return was when all WCW programming was canceled by order of parent company Turner Broadcasting's then-chairman-and-CEO Jamie Kellner, who was seeking to sell the promotion off after Turner's parent, Time Warner, merged with AOL and wanted to rid the conglomerate of assets costing them millions. Wrestiling/VinceMcMahon, the head of WCW's rival [[Creator/{{WWE}} World Wrestling Federation]], bought the promotion's remaining assets and programming library for ''$3 million'' (bear in mind that WCW was worth over '''$500 million''' at one time) just so that AOL Time Warner can desperately rid their portfolio of professional wrestling. An extreme example of an entire ''company'' being ScrewedByTheNetwork.
* Wrestling/{{ECW}}'s show on [[Creator/SpikeTV TNN]] was supposed to be the thing that would take the company out of "cult following" status and into mainstream success. Instead, the financial and logistical pressures of producing the weekly program, as well as the network's forcing the promotion to tone down the blood-and-guts style that made them famous, and then failing to promote or back them in any way (even going so far as to negotiate to bring the [[{{WWE}} WWF]] to the network while ECW was still airing), ended up killing the promotion. By the end, ECW was in open WriterRevolt, trying desperately to get their show canceled so they could shop it around to other networks before the money ran out. It didn't work, and like WCW their assets were sold off to rival WWE (who had just changed their name from WWF following [[ScrewedByTheLawyers a trademark lawsuit]] from the World Wide Fund for Nature) two years after they declared bankruptcy. WWE briefly revived the ECW name for a show on Creator/SciFiChannel (later Syfy) in 2006, then permanently retired the name in 2010.
[[/folder]]



[[AC:Wrestling]]
* The infamous "FingerpokeOfDoom" event during a 1999 episode of ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' is often cited as the beginning of the end for Wrestling/{{WCW}}[[note]]If it wasn't this, then David Arquette's ill-fated world title run did it for sure[[/note]], but the event that truly sent the promotion to the point of no return was when all WCW programming was canceled by order of parent company Turner Broadcasting's then-chairman-and-CEO Jamie Kellner, who was seeking to sell the promotion off after Turner's parent, Time Warner, merged with AOL and wanted to rid the conglomerate of assets costing them millions. Wrestiling/VinceMcMahon, the head of WCW's rival [[Creator/{{WWE}} World Wrestling Federation]], bought the promotion's remaining assets and programming library for ''$3 million'' (bear in mind that WCW was worth over '''$500 million''' at one time) just so that AOL Time Warner can desperately rid their portfolio of professional wrestling. An extreme example of an entire ''company'' being ScrewedByTheNetwork.
* Wrestling/{{ECW}}'s show on [[Creator/SpikeTV TNN]] was supposed to be the thing that would take the company out of "cult following" status and into mainstream success. Instead, the financial and logistical pressures of producing the weekly program, as well as the network's forcing the promotion to tone down the blood-and-guts style that made them famous, and then failing to promote or back them in any way (even going so far as to negotiate to bring the [[{{WWE}} WWF]] to the network while ECW was still airing), ended up killing the promotion. By the end, ECW was in open WriterRevolt, trying desperately to get their show canceled so they could shop it around to other networks before the money ran out. It didn't work, and like WCW their assets were sold off to rival WWE (who had just changed their name from WWF following [[ScrewedByTheLawyers a trademark lawsuit]] from the World Wide Fund for Nature) two years after they declared bankruptcy. WWE briefly revived the ECW name for a show on Creator/SciFiChannel (later Syfy) in 2006, then permanently retired the name in 2010.

to:

[[AC:Wrestling]]
* The infamous "FingerpokeOfDoom" event during a 1999 episode of ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' is often cited as the beginning of the end for Wrestling/{{WCW}}[[note]]If it wasn't this, then David Arquette's ill-fated world title run did it for sure[[/note]], but the event that truly sent the promotion to the point of no return was when all WCW programming was canceled by order of parent company Turner Broadcasting's then-chairman-and-CEO Jamie Kellner, who was seeking to sell the promotion off after Turner's parent, Time Warner, merged with AOL and wanted to rid the conglomerate of assets costing them millions. Wrestiling/VinceMcMahon, the head of WCW's rival [[Creator/{{WWE}} World Wrestling Federation]], bought the promotion's remaining assets and programming library for ''$3 million'' (bear in mind that WCW was worth over '''$500 million''' at one time) just so that AOL Time Warner can desperately rid their portfolio of professional wrestling. An extreme example of an entire ''company'' being ScrewedByTheNetwork.
* Wrestling/{{ECW}}'s show on [[Creator/SpikeTV TNN]] was supposed to be the thing that would take the company out of "cult following" status and into mainstream success. Instead, the financial and logistical pressures of producing the weekly program, as well as the network's forcing the promotion to tone down the blood-and-guts style that made them famous, and then failing to promote or back them in any way (even going so far as to negotiate to bring the [[{{WWE}} WWF]] to the network while ECW was still airing), ended up killing the promotion. By the end, ECW was in open WriterRevolt, trying desperately to get their show canceled so they could shop it around to other networks before the money ran out. It didn't work, and like WCW their assets were sold off to rival WWE (who had just changed their name from WWF following [[ScrewedByTheLawyers a trademark lawsuit]] from the World Wide Fund for Nature) two years after they declared bankruptcy. WWE briefly revived the ECW name for a show on Creator/SciFiChannel (later Syfy) in 2006, then permanently retired the name in 2010.
5th May '16 1:38:38 AM Anddrix
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** It also ended the long run of chief creative officer Bill Damaschke, who had been with the studio since 1995, and the short run of COO Mark Zoradi, who had been with the company since earlier that summer (Zoradi would take over the Cinemark theater chain months later), as part of the restructuring.

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** It also ended the long run of chief creative officer Bill Damaschke, who had been with the studio since 1995, and the short run of COO and longtime Disney executive Mark Zoradi, who had been with the company DWA since earlier that summer (Zoradi would take over the Cinemark theater chain months later), as part of the restructuring.
2nd May '16 4:02:32 PM Mario1995
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* ''WesternAnimation/PenguinsOfMadagascar'':
** The film was such a disaster at the domestic box office that Creator/DreamWorksAnimation lost an enormous amount of money (though the failed merger with Creator/{{Hasbro}} deserves credit, too), resulting in studio Pacific Data Images shutting down as part of a restructuring of the company.
** It also ended the long run of Bill Damaschke, who had been with the studio since 1995, and the short run of COO Mark Zoradi, who had been with the company since earlier that summer (Zoradi would take over the Cinemark theater chain months later).
** And finally, it was the beginning of the end for founder Jeffrey Katzenberg himself. The next two films were financial successes, but not on high enough of a level to please shareholders. This eventually led to Katzenberg agreeing to sell the studio to Comcast within 18 months and divest his involvement with DWA on a heavy basis, though he stands to get a giant payout for the sale.

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* ''WesternAnimation/PenguinsOfMadagascar'':
''WesternAnimation/PenguinsOfMadagascar'' was instrumental in ending Creator/DreamWorksAnimation[='=]s reign as an independent, pioneering animation studio after more than a decade. It took several job losses to get to that point, though:
** The film was such a disaster at the domestic box office that Creator/DreamWorksAnimation lost an enormous amount of money (though the failed merger with Creator/{{Hasbro}} deserves credit, too), resulting in studio too). When [=DreamWorks=] anticipated it would lose $49 million from the film, Pacific Data Images shutting Images, who helped produce this film and the studio's famed ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' series, was shut down as part of a restructuring of the company.
** It also ended the long run of chief creative officer Bill Damaschke, who had been with the studio since 1995, and the short run of COO Mark Zoradi, who had been with the company since earlier that summer (Zoradi would take over the Cinemark theater chain months later).
later), as part of the restructuring.
** And finally, it was the beginning of the end for founder Jeffrey Katzenberg himself. himself, with his ambitions against Disney finally getting the better of him. The next two studio's [[WesternAnimation/{{Home}} next]] [[WesternAnimation/KungFuPanda3 two]] films were financial successes, but not on high enough of a level to please shareholders. This eventually led to Katzenberg agreeing to sell the studio to Comcast within 18 months (after scrapping a plan to take the company private with a Chinese shareholder) and divest his involvement with DWA on a heavy basis, though he stands to get a giant payout for the sale.basis.
30th Apr '16 10:30:24 PM Anddrix
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** And finally, it was the beginning of the end for founder Jeffrey Katzenberg himself. The next two films were financial successes, but not on high enough of a level to please shareholders. This eventually led to Katzenberg agreeing to sell the studio to Comcast within 18 months and divest his involvement with DWA on a heavy basis.

to:

** And finally, it was the beginning of the end for founder Jeffrey Katzenberg himself. The next two films were financial successes, but not on high enough of a level to please shareholders. This eventually led to Katzenberg agreeing to sell the studio to Comcast within 18 months and divest his involvement with DWA on a heavy basis.basis, though he stands to get a giant payout for the sale.
30th Apr '16 7:28:17 AM Anddrix
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Added DiffLines:

** And finally, it was the beginning of the end for founder Jeffrey Katzenberg himself. The next two films were financial successes, but not on high enough of a level to please shareholders. This eventually led to Katzenberg agreeing to sell the studio to Comcast within 18 months and divest his involvement with DWA on a heavy basis.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CreatorKiller